Joey Chernov

Expo 2012 Concept

15 posts in this topic

I came across this image showing a rendering of the Expo site and the planned location for the Theme Pavilion of the Exposition:

post-4303-126108902432_thumb.jpg

As well as this labeled image of the planned fair sight:

post-4303-126108905372_thumb.jpg

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If I recall, aren't Recognized Expositions smaller than Universal Expositions??

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I came across this image showing a rendering of the Expo site and the planned location for the Theme Pavilion of the Exposition:

post-4303-126108902432_thumb.jpg

As well as this labeled image of the planned fair sight:

post-4303-126108905372_thumb.jpg

Just around the bend is a huge oil refinery with dozens of oil tankers ready to unload. Ironically, this Expo about protecting the ocean and the coasts is located on one of the most endangered portions of the Korean coastline.

I have a personal bone to pick: the Expo's about the health of the Ocean (which I assume includes its inhabitants, yet the aquarium they've created to complement the Expo is holding captive naturally migrating marine mammals -- Beluga whales, large porpoises -- for no good reason.

That being said, this small "Special Expo" would be a really nice Expo to visit: not too crowded, a focused theme (who could disagree with healthier oceans?), and the thrill of being just miles from an international political fault line. The gravitational fields exerted by China, Japan, and North Korea must be intense.

South Korea is one of the most, if not THE most digitized nations in the world. Worth seeing. Plus, the Korean people are handsome -- the women are exceptionally beautiful -- and the food is wunderbar. Parking can be a bear. So...who has plans to attend?

Korea Times-Yeosu Expo 6 Apr 2010.pdf

Yeosu Expo 2012 Best Practices Area briefing.pdf

post-4284-0-38822300-1296391661_thumb.jp

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Just around the bend is a huge oil refinery with dozens of oil tankers ready to unload. Ironically, this Expo about protecting the ocean and the coasts is located on one of the most endangered portions of the Korean coastline.

I have a personal bone to pick: the Expo's about the health of the Ocean (which I assume includes its inhabitants, yet the aquarium they've created to complement the Expo is holding captive naturally migrating marine mammals -- Beluga whales, large porpoises -- for no good reason.

That being said, this small "Special Expo" would be a really nice Expo to visit: not too crowded, a focused theme (who could disagree with healthier oceans?), and the thrill of being just miles from an international political fault line. The gravitational fields exerted by China, Japan, and North Korea must be intense.

South Korea is one of the most, if not THE most digitized nations in the world. Worth seeing. Plus, the Korean people are handsome -- the women are exceptionally beautiful -- and the food is wunderbar. Parking can be a bear. So...who has plans to attend?

This is not the first Expo with an Oceans theme. I think the previous one was- 1975?- is that right?

I'm sure aquariums holding animals captive can lay claim to a long list of meritorious reasons which serve to justify the need to do so. Everyone's mileage may differ, of course, as to how valid those claims might be. And a lot of that is based on an individual's rather complicated system of values, purpose and relative consideration of the balance between humans, environment, and other life on earth. Probably no two individuals have exactly the same opinion on these things.

Perhaps having an Oceans expo 'right around the bend' from a huge oil refinery and tanker docks is a perfect place to demonstrate how a balance of things can be addressed safely and responsibly. Let's hope so anyway.

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I think Okinawa Expo 75 and Lisbon Expo 98 both had ocean related themes.

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I think Okinawa Expo 75 and Lisbon Expo 98 both had ocean related themes.

Yes Okinawa's title: International Ocean Exposition

+ Lisbon's: Oceans: A Heritage for the Future - but focusing a lot on Portugal's ocean going history and the Age of Discovery rather than on oceans as a resource

(Findling+Pelle Encyclopedia of World's Fairs and Expositions)

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I have plans to attend the Expo 2012. Does someone know about accommodation? Yeosu seems to be very far away from any bigger cities... maybe 3-4 hours to Busan and 2-3 hours to Gwangju? I've heard about a new hotel beeing built but I'm not sure.

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After seeing shangai Expo @ an area of 1304 acres Yeosu looks Ant to me!.. Any ways how many hectares is the Expo site? Any body knows?

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Century 21 in Seattle was a very small exposition. It was about 75 acres. I sometimes think about that when I visit the annual NYS Fair in Syracuse which is over 350 acres. Seattle's fair was tiny but the planners called it a "jewel box" fair. And it certainly was.

I don't know much about this future exposition in Korea, but I like those images. Fairs which utilize water (San Francisco in 1939, Chicago in 1933, Montreal in 1967 for example) have been extremely well planned and almost inordinately beautiful. This fair just might have the same sort of impact on the visitors. If I was able to do so, I would be very interested in visiting.

One other thought. Larger fairs can be almost overwhelming. I remember the 1964 NYWF boasting about its massive size and the fact that it would take four light years just to see the entire thing. As I think back, how good is that? I have read that such boasting may have caused some potential visitors not to attend. It may have come across and too large and too difficult to visit.

I guess it might be a function of age, but a smaller, more manageable fair is far mor appealing to me.

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The size was one of the things that kept me out of Shanghai. I knew I would not be able to take enough time off to see it all.

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Size and line length.

Is it worth it to take x days of precious vacation time, just to spend 80% of that time standing in line? Meaning only 20% of that time might be spent actually seeing and hearing something interesting?

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Sometimes queues can be fun. I think of Zaragoza where the time just sped by with chats even with my low level of Spanish. And although I think that's more to do with it being in Spain than the expo size, I have hopes that a far flung small expo will have reasonable length queues.

For me, my major concern is not about the amount of queuing per se, but queue management and associated with that allowing a sensible number of people into pavilions (there were some quite horridly over-stuffed pavilions in Shanghai)

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Speaking about queue speed and capacity management, does anybody remember a cartoon showing the moving sidewalk belts inside the 1964-65 Vatican Pavilion, at the Pieta exhibit?

As I recall they had three moving sidewalks, all going the same direction from left to right. And they were at three different speeds- fast, medium, and slow- elevated theater style, so that visitors could choose how long a look they wanted to get. Imagine people trying to snap an indoor photograph while riding the 'fast sidewalk'. :) But the queue line was probably shorter for the fast sidewalk. I imagine the queue line branched into 3 lines somewhere inside the pavilion, with signs advising visitors which line was for which sidewalk.

Anyway, I recall some kind of period cartoon being posted here on this board, which poked fun at the experience.

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Maybe it is in that film about the NYWF narrated by Jud Hirsch where I heard a statement about how the reported long lines at the Fair may have kept potential visitors away.

I am a big fan of the NYS Fair and attend each year, but I know that I don't really consider attending the Fair on Labor Day weekend because the crowds are generally enormous (often exceeding 100,000 per day). Parking prices are increased and traffic can be very difficult. Having said that, it is quite evident that a whole lot of people DO choose to attend at that time. I suppose it is a bit like saying that "nobody ever goes to that restaurant anymore because it is always so crowded." (I actually have a friend who once said this to me.)

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