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waynebretl

Spruce it up with paint - and haul out that trash!

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1 hour ago, Bill Cotter said:

Thanks, Wayne. I'm sure that was a lot of work, but people will find quite a treasure trove awaiting them.

Actually, the new site, with drag and drop file posting, made it fairly easy, compared to having to use a text search box. I'm just glad I was a pack rat and still had them on my computer. 

FYI, it seems that (the many) pdf files disappeared and (the few) jpg files did not.

If any are still missing because I goofed, let me know.

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What do you know - I got a reward for doing this. Looking at the Denmark pavilion - Koppers file, I spotted one of the closed circuit color TVs in a pedestal enclosure in front of Denmark. 

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I looked over the operational drawings, and they have pages for the TV origination wiring, and for the telephone conduit (which probably carried the closed circuit TV feeds), but no separate drawing for the closed circuit feeds only.

So now I'm wondering if anyone has seen other TV enclosures like the one in front of Denmark in other photos?

 

TV enclosure in front of Denmark.jpg

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My guess is that TV was showing programming related to the Denmark pavilion. I looked at a number of pictures, though, and none of them show an image on the screen, so who knows?

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13 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

My guess is that TV was showing programming related to the Denmark pavilion. I looked at a number of pictures, though, and none of them show an image on the screen, so who knows?

That would be interesting, but I don't think so. There were no affordable, compact sources of TV signals in 1964, so I think it must have been the RCA feed.

Also, that's a color set, and Europe was in the throes of selecting the PAL color system, and went directly to rectangular screens in the following years; they never produced any round screen sets like that except for experimental use.

Having a set outside like that on a sunny day would be mostly futile, as the picture would be washed out by sunlight, but RCA did it anyway.

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I just re-read the guidebook entry for RCA, and they claimed they would have over 250 closed circuit sets on the grounds. If that's true, there should be one every 330 feet or so.  The only sets I have seen (besides those inside RCA of course) are this one in front of Denmark; one inside Florida; one in the Formica house (no pictures of it turned on); and one in the Underground Home. There is also one in the upper level of Gas in the NBC opening video (actually filmed earlier, during construction, in February IIRC), on which Carol Channing sees her lost group of children.  I have no idea if this was permanent.  

I wonder if RCA expected most of the sets to be inside pavilions and got turned down for many/most? I also wonder if there were some inside VIP lounges?

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I wonder if all the phone and TV conduits were left in place or removed?

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Ford Pavilion, in the 1965 Philco section.  Looks like it's just playing a color bar pattern.  Unless it's showing the turntable in the RCA Pavilion.

100 - Philco radio and tv display.jpg

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Thanks, Randy.  Yes, that's a color bar pattern.  The set looks properly adjusted, by the way.

This would be one of the few places that might use a non-RCA set.

The butterfly was the theme element of Philco-Ford's color TV magazine ads.

Trivia: Ford bought Philco in December 1961. Motorola was the 8-track tape player maker that developed a successful method of finishing the capstans so they could pull the lubricated tape without slipping. In the early 70's, the Motorola factory was shipping 8-track automotive players in RCA-branded packaging, which Ford then bought for installation in cars. 

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Here's a brochure for World Color, Inc., who did the color separations for the printing plates for the official Dexter postcards.

Note that they stripped in a real sky from Daytona Beach, FL behind the architect's rendition of the GM pavilion.  Done by hand - no Photoshop in those days.

I was surprised by the statement that this brochure was done on a 2-color press, as it is clearly 4-color printing. Apparently it is/was possible to get good registration with two passes.

World color inc brochure 001.jpg

World color inc brochure 002.jpg

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3 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

That's a great flyer, Wayne. Where on Earth did you find it?

Must have been on ebay, but long ago enough that I don't recall. Things have been so slow here the past few days I just started going through my stash to look for things I hadn't posted before. I thought I would have to scan this, but found I already had the scans, which must have come from the ebay listing. (One clue was that they were rotated sideways, which I would have fixed).  The color is just great, IMO, and it was interesting to find that Dexter printed the postcards but didn't do the color separations.

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I just checked and restored the scans of the Dexter bifold business card in the following topic:

 

 

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To answer Randy's April 5th question about the phone and TV conduits after the fair. All of the underground cabling not required for the post fair park was sold for salvage, but the horizontal portions of conduit were left in place. Having just spent the last 3 days at the New York Public Library pouring over thousands of pages of the demolition files of the Fair Corporation, contrary to popular belief fair officials did not just dig a big hole, dump everything in, cover it over and go home. You have to remember that many fair employees were former civil servants who took their jobs quite seriously. They also routinely relied on the opinions of outside consultants to assist them in determining what was salvageable and what its value was when disposing of these items. The records document how meticulous the Fair Corp's Engineering Department staff were in ensuring that the demolition and restoration of the park was carried out exactly as needed. This process started with the engineering staff issuing very detailed contract specs to demolition contractors during the bidding process which began while the fairs second season was in progress and then holding them accountable during the entire time they were on site after the fair closed. All of the Fair Corporations demolition contractors were required to post a performance bond and show proof of liability and workers compensation insurance as part of the contract process. The engineering staff also kept a close watch on the exhibitors demolition contractors as well. Oversight of all work was carried out by sending the engineering staff out on a regular basis to conduct inspections and file reports with the head of engineering for his review. The head of engineering in turn issued weekly summary reports to top fair officials on the progress of the demolition and restoration work and any major issues they ran into. If any contractors work was not performed according to their contract, the fair staff would write a letter to the contractor demanding they correct the noted deficiencies. If the deficiencies were not promptly corrected the fair staff would either hold up the contractors payments, file a claim for damages with their insurer or in some cases file suit through counsel. In fact, some of these insurance claims and lawsuits were the main reason the Fair Corporations business wasn't wound up until February of 1972. The fair staff and officials were also very mindful that their work was subject to Parks Department and City Council oversight. As such, they routinely consulted with city officials as questions arose to ensure that the work was being done according to government standards and in line with their expectations. Another surprising fact that I noted in my research is that the theft of salvage and new materials was a major problem after the fair. The Pinkerton security staff that patrolled the site was kept very busy keeping an eye on unauthorized persons stealing things off the job sites as well as the demo contractors theft of materials not covered under their contracts. In some cases this resulted in restoration work having to be redone a second time as it related to wiring and piping for the permanent improvements. 

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Excellent info, Craig - thank you.

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Milton Bradley ad, 1964, for puzzles, games, and a "World On a String" toy that looks suspiciously like it could be the Unisphere.

 

Milton Bradley ad 1964.pdf

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Bethlehem Steel NYWF preview add - the same artwork in a different order was used in an ad published during the fair.

Also, a Bethlehem Steel ad for hollow structural sections, used in the construction of the International Plaza carillon.

Bethlehem Steel NYWF Preview ad.pdf

Bethlehem Steel International Carillon.pdf

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Wayne Sweepers ad, from The American City magazine, June 1964

Wayne Sweepers Jun64.pdf

Kodak Recordak ad, 1965.

See who's who on your birthday at the Recordak microfilm exhibit in the Kodak Pavilion.

Kodak Recordak ad 1965.pdf

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