Jump to content
waynebretl

Spruce it up with paint - and haul out that trash!

Recommended Posts

Here's a chance to win a trip to the fair, but NOTE rule #2:

No entry will be acceptable unless accompanied by a roll of film for processing.

And rule #7; This contest is not applicable where restricted or4 prohibited by Federal, State, or local laws or regulations.

 

How many states in 1964 allowed public contests requiring a purchase, I wonder? I seem to recall that Wisconsin did not even allow any promotions based on random drawings, free or not.

There would be some mention of non-applicability in Wisconasin in contests advertised in the Chicago papers.

 

Snappy photo contest.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that Unisphere one. Just enough uncommon information to make it interesting! General Motors is nice too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great ads. Why the big logs around the base of the Unisphere pool in the Reo Ad?

The Canadian Pacific ad was nostalgic. I stayed at Le Chateau Frontenac in Quebec when CP owned it. Great hotel. The winter carnival is worth a trip north to freeze your butt off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the logs were used as a foundation for a building? They look relatively new, so I doubt they removed some from the Old Theme Centre. Obviously the Unisphere is already built, maybe just temporarily storing foundations for nearby pavilions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't pay any attention to the logs until now. I could imagine them being used to hold down some tarps to cover concrete while it cured, but I really have no clue.

Another mystery for the sleuths around here to chew on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

or maybe just parking buffers to keep workers from bumping the walls? Anybody got shots during construction? Did workers park here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

or maybe just parking buffers to keep workers from bumping the walls? Anybody got shots during construction? Did workers park here?

I suggest that, since the ad is dated February, 1965, the logs were part of the winter-izing done between the seasons.

BTW: a newbie here, digging everything I am reading and seeing of the fair I never got to visit until last December (whew. . . that was one long line! 44 years!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the second image (first posting) looks as if that refuse hauler is attempting to cart away the Unisphere. It is not the best of presentations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to PTU! To add to the Unispheres not-quite-as-shining advertisements, it looks like its next to be demolished with all the materials on the ground and the half-build pavilions in the background.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a nice two-page Disney - Carousel of Progress - GE ad from 1964

 

[ edit - added to facilitate future searches] - Disney in front of Kaleidophonic light screen with architectural model of GE pavilion

 

DISNEY GE 64.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the ad. As a 12 year old in 1964, I was very enamored with anything related to Walt Disney, be it his movies, his participation in the World's Fair or Disneyland. I would have been (and still am to some degree) mesmerized by this colorful two-page spread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comet ad 1 was supposed to be color - fixed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting those ads. Old ads are interesting reflections of culture.

One uses no logo and the others use two separate logos stylizing the Ford pavilion.

Taschen publishes decadal collections of All-American Ads, the title of which suggests a European perspective. I would be interested in a collection of European ads of those pivotal post-war years when the advertising industry came into its own as a quantitative science.

For instance, the Comet ads posted are conversational, direct, idiomatic, and scan like spoken language. Is there, as in paleontology, a "transitional form" between the Helvetica dosed modern ads of the 60s and the old style, wooden... I don't have the specialized vocabulary to describe what are easily recognized as "patent medicine" ads or the "square" language of the past?

I remember seeing a stark Coke ad as an example of modernism, perhaps using the "Real Thing" phrase of the time. I wonder if advertising professionals identify a "missing link."

Speaking of transitions...

Oh, and Wayne, thanks for digital TV! (Did you pop a champagne bottle?) Although I do have a bone to pick with the cursed stations like my local PBS, who took the transition opportunity to shift from UHF to VHF without telling anyone. I use a DB-2 antenna tuned for UHF stations, so I lost signal not because of analog to digital but UHF to VHF. I may have to resort to coat hangers and aluminum foil. Tall masts are problematic in Miami's lightning country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×