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Curtis Cates

Adventurer's Inn

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I remember the one in Yonkers on Central Ave across the street from Patty Murphy's.....I only have a vauge rememberence of the Flushing location....I grew up in Westchester so Yonkers location was close to home.....

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Never went, Curtis... but here's an excerpted personal account, along with some other info and pix I found online... including some references to NYWF legacies.

index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=3588

Adventurer's Inn was one of my favorite places in the world! My grandmother used to live in the apartment buildings right around the corner from AI, and she used to bring me there all the time. When I was in elementary school I had many a birthday party there . As I got older, Adventurer's Inn grew with me! They kept expanding - from a kiddie park to a full blown amusement park. I believe they got a lot of their later attractions from New Jersey's Palisades Park, which closed around the time they expanded-- as well as some from Coney Island. The garbage cans around the place were from the 1964 World's Fair, right down the road, in fact!

Although the rides and restaurant closed around 1978, the arcade remained open for at least another 10 years or so, I believe - and even though the concrete landing at the top of the arcade entrance way was sinking, and the circular mosaic design of the Adventurer's Inn Pirate was nearly obscured in a perpetual puddle of water - I can still remember visiting this place with fondness.

...

Just off the Whitestone Expressway once stood Queens’ answer to Coney Island – Adventurer’s Inn.

From the Batman slide to the Toboggan Ride to the Flight To Mars, the place had carnival-style rides permanently mounted – many of which came from Palisades Park in New Jersey.

The whole place was a mish-mosh of styles, and even the garbage cans were leftovers from the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.

But the place had a certain level of enchantment that no other permanent spot in Queens had. From the pirate mosaic in the ground by the entrance to the guy who gave change for the games in the arcade, to the rust slowly growing on the steel structures, the place had a carnival atmosphere

Though much of the place was demolished in the late 1970s, the arcade lived on until the mid 1980s. The whole thing is gone now, replaced by some office buildings around Linden Boulevard, including the College Point DMV.

Wonder if those trashcans were the same ones Randy just pointed out in his Food Court thread?

Bowery&Delancey3.tiff

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Of course, Adventurers Inn! I used to go all the time but was very young and dont remember

much of it. I think it finally closed around 1978 or so. The rides were closed first. The restaurant/ arcade

remained open for a while but eventually closed shortly after. Here is a page with some of the best photos

Ive ever seen of the last remaining areas of the park.

<a href="http://www.bbrent.com/gallery/ad_inn.htm" target="_blank">http://www.bbrent.com/gallery/ad_inn.htm</a>

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Thats funny Farient, I hadnt noticed that before. It really was kind of a cheesey little

amusement park, but it had charm and was loads of fun. The rides would be considered

kiddy rides by todays standards.I wonder if they picked up some of their rides from the old

amusement park that stood where Queens Center Mall currently stands.

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<!--coloro:#3333FF--><span style="color:#3333FF"><!--/coloro-->Adventurers Inn..yes I remember it , but again I was young and have spotty memories..I seem to remember that they had a booth there where you could record a record, or more like a single/ 45..

I remember the arcade too..and the wooden bowling games..and I remember getting those pressed tokens with your name on them and somehow the machine often didn't line up so what you thought you typed didn't end up being what came out at the end..

Hope you all had a lovely Thanksgiving!

Nancy<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

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I wonder if they picked up some of their rides from the old

amusement park that stood where Queens Center Mall currently stands.

Fairyland!! Now THAT is a blast from the past. Adventurers Inn was pretty much as everyone explained it. I only went once and it was not memorable. Great Adventure/Lion Country Safari was the hot amusement park when AI was closing.

Anyone remember Nelly Bly's and Nunleys??

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nunleys.jpg

Since I couldn't get a refund I have held onto this ticket waiting for my ride.

For those unfamilair with Nunley's, it was a small amusement park in Baldwin on Long Island, where I just so happened to live. Its main feature was a carousel. Sadly they pulled the place down to build a stinking Pep Boys. The carousel sits in storage somewhere. I have the ticket in my wallet - it always gets a great reaction when someone mentions Nunleys and I pull it out.

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There was a great inside joke about Nunley's during an episode last season of HBO's "Entourage." One of the characters disparages another for having learned everything he knows about playing golf there.

There was also a nice instrumental done by Billy Joel a few years back called "Nunley's Carousel."

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There was a great inside joke about Nunley's during an episode last season of HBO's "Entourage." One of the characters disparages another for having learned everything he knows about playing golf there.

There was also a nice instrumental done by Billy Joel a few years back called "Nunley's Carousel."

The carosuel is tucked away safely at the Cradle of Aviation, an air and space museum in Garden City, Long Island...near Roosevelt Field. A friend of mine works next door at the Long Island Children's Museum and has seen it up close and personal. One of the horses sits in the office of the President of the Cradle of Aviation.

A group of school kids from Baldwin or Merrick has raised money to bring it to a public park over on the south shore...back to it's home so to speak.

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I just recently scanned a 1950-60's era John Pender aerial photo of the Flushing Airport, and low and behold, the photographer captured a portion of the Adventurer's Inn at the bottom edge of the frame...

AdventurersInn.jpg[/attachment:74ebc]

Best Regards,

Kevin

PS - You can see the full Flushing Airport aerial photo here: [url:74ebc]http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=6332&p=48165#p48165[/url:74ebc]

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Great picture once again from the Pender archives!

There was a small Adventurer's Inn located on Rte 110 in Farmingdale on Long Island. Still exists as Adventureland. They say on thier website <a href="http://www.adventureland.us/" target="_blank">http://www.adventureland.us/</a> "Long Island's home of Family Fun since 1962". Must have been when it changed hands.

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nunleys.jpg

Since I couldn't get a refund I have held onto this ticket waiting for my ride.

For those unfamilair with Nunley's, it was a small amusement park in Baldwin on Long Island, where I just so happened to live. Its main feature was a carousel. Sadly they pulled the place down to build a stinking Pep Boys. The carousel sits in storage somewhere. I have the ticket in my wallet - it always gets a great reaction when someone mentions Nunleys and I pull it out.

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I grew up in Jackson Heights and later in Baldwin. I remember both parks, though my memories of Nunleys are much clearer today. The premier attraction there was indeed a beautiful old carousel, complete with a brass ring for free rides and a mechanical "band" that played the music of the gods. I still have a couple of the steel rings which were supposed to be thrown into a large garbage can held up by an attendant towards the end of each ride.

I also learned everything I know about golf (at least about putting) at Nunleys.

Besides the carousel and miniature golf course, the small park featured these other kiddy rides:

- a ferris wheel (about 25' high)

- a motorboat ride (in a pool of about 20' diameter)

- kiddy hand cars (propel yourself around a railroad tracked route maybe 500' long- these cars could be made to derail if the rider acheived the necessary speed through the loopback turn halfway through the ride, at which point a surly teenged attendant would have to rerail the fairly heavy car before any riders could continue. I also remember being stuck behind small kids not quite strong enough to propel themselves around the banked turn)

- an automobile ride (seated two youngsters and travelled on a wooden planked course)

- a kiddy roller coaster ( whose largest drop was about 12')

- a "tubs of fun" ride (which, when operated correctly by the passengers could induce nausea)

Nunleys also had many pinball and arcade style games in the barn which housed the carousel.

I can remember a "Grandma Predicts" mechanical fortune teller, "Test Your Strength", numerous pinball games, a row of shooting gallery games (early infrared technology), some arcade style shooting gallery games (one with an early attempt at holigraphy), some racing/driving games, baseball and golf arcade games, the ever poular "Sea Devil", and towards the end, even Pac Man, Space Invaders, Donkey Kong, and Asteroids.

There was also a snack bar/luncheonette fronting Sunrise Highway that was often open independantly of the carousel and park.

Thanks for the memories!

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One of my brother's friends bought the hand propelled railroad when Nunleys closed and has it set up in his yard. I remember cranking the wheel like crazy to try to catch up to the kid in front of me. It seemed like such a long run at the time! All of those rides were there forever. Thanks to you as well for bringing back some great memories!!!

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Our big local amusement park, Riverside, had those little hand cars, too.

Hadn't thought of those in years! I'd love to try them again, to see if they're as thrilling as I remember....

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I remember being stuck behind my brother on the hand propelled cars and screaming at him to pump faster

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Some great news today from USA Today:

Thursday, July 12

Garden City - A historic carousel will make a comeback on Long Island. Nassau County legislators approved a $484,000 restoration of 95-year-old Nunley's Carousel, which has been in storage for almost 10 years. About $64,000 is coming from Pennies for Ponies, a charity started by Rachel Obergh, 9.

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I remember Adventurer's Inn. We saved our allowance to go there.It was a nice place to hang out. I took my daughter there when she was young but it fell into disrepair and closed.

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Oh, man... I TRULY LOVED those hand cars when I was a kid! Never missed riding them on a trip to Canobie.

Later, as a teen working at Canobie Lake Park in the 1960s, I derailed the Caterpillar ride by running it at too high of a speed. (gee my boss was right after all!) I was promptly "demoted" to running the Hand Car ride. Those things were HEAAAAVY and had a helluva lot of momentum once they got rolling.

I remember lots of those straggler kids getting rear-ended something fierce!

What a bummer it was to be the poor kid that got stuck behind a little kid that wasn't strong enough to keep the thing moving under his own power! If you've ever ridden an Alpine Slide down a mountain or gotten stuck in a go-kart behind a timid kid, you know what I mean. (By the way, the Alpine Slide is a particular bummer when you're stuck behind an 8-year-old girl [no offense intended, ladies])

... ed&search=

post-54-1206305317_thumb.jpgnick.jpg[/attachment:1b8e2]

As the ride operator, we'd push the little kids as fast as we could to get them going and see how far we could send them around the track before they pooped out! I remember the handles would be spinning so fast that the kids couldn't keep their hands on them until it slowed down to a normal speed. Even the adrenaline rush from their sheer terror didn't give them the strength to get back to the starting point under their own power!

The cars were a real quality item with quality parts... built like a locomotive. Even as a kid, I remember thinking these were some serious pieces of machinery. The stainless steel seat-back and side rails were cool. Looking at the Hodges website, the cars don't look as elegant as I remember them, but I do remember the red leather (naugahyde in 1958-ish?) seats. I've thought of that ride many times over the years. It's nice to know that they're still being made.

I ran the Silver "Rocket Ships" at Canobie for a whole summer, too. When I did the Images of America book about Canobie, I learned that the controller unit of that ride was actually the controller out of a trolley car! (Canobie Lake Park was built by the Mass. Northeastern Street Railway Co. in 1902) The cars were just like these at Disney.

SilverRocketRideWEB.jpg[/attachment:1b8e2]

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I took a major wipeout on the Alpine slide at Camelback in the Poconos, friction burn took the skin right off my arm from the elbow halfway up to my shoulder. The edges of the wound actually had little tendrils of smoke coming off of them for a second or two. This was many years ago, when I discovered the hard way that I was too big to go down the thing at the speeds I used to be able to as a youngling. I also had several memorable wipeouts at good ol TrAction Park in North Jersey back in the 1980s, but not on their alpine slide, since there was always a slowpoke in front of you to kill the experience. Nonetheless, I had a slightly broken nose from TrAction Park's waterslide that stopped running water for a few seconds on the person in front of me, causing a high speed collision with my nose to the guys foot, a speedboat that sank with me in it, and of course the famous enema/wedgie slide. The good ol days!

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