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scrap metal - the worlds last great ocean liners


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#31 magikbilly

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 06:57 PM

Hi Randy,
That is true. Once the competition "ended" or frayed, helped by the airlines of course, my interest just drops off rapidly. I prefer the old 4 stackers and the stories they tell. And you are also correct re Mauretania and the speed of her contemporary rivals - when the record was finally wrested from her by the Bremen it was by a very slim margin - perhaps 30 minutes! She made a single attempt to regain it and although she did not she broke every speed record she had previously set! Of course, she had undergone rather extensive refitting to meet this challenge in 1928 when her HP was raised from 70,000 to 90,000. After one considers the advances in design from 1902-04 when Mauretania was conceived and construction began to the late 1920's when Bremen was built her accomplishments really show.

Best,
magikbilly

#32 Randy Treadway

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 08:50 PM

Here is my contribution- a newly scanned slide from Sept 1964.

The Cunard pier, with Bill's office building on the right. The ship (which looks a bit long in the tooth with those crows nests) is blowing steam out one of the stacks, so I guess it either just arrived, or is getting ready to depart.
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closeup- can't quite make out the name on the stern, but it appears to end in 'nia' (that sure helps, huh!- )
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Let's see....Cunard's fleet of ships in 1964 seems to have been:
Alaunia III
Andania III
Andria
Arabia II
Ausonia II
Carinthia III
Carmania II
Caronia II
Franconia III
Ivernia II
Ivernia III
Maronia
Mauretania II
Media
Parthia II
Parthia III
Prinses Irene
Queen Elizabeth
Queen Mary
Saxonia II
Scythia III
Stratheden
Sylvania II

That's a heck of a lot of ships with names ending in 'nia' !

Cunard didn't have many two-stackers in 1964. I vote for Mauretania (II), whose hull had been painted the pail green color in 1962 and was employed in 1964 mostly for New York - Caribbean cruises. It only had a year left in its service life.

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#33 Mike Kraus

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 09:08 PM

Right you are, Billy.

"Wilhelm Gustloff" - 9300~
"Goya" - 7000~
"Steuben" - 4500~

All KDF liners involved in the largest planned seaborne evacuation in history, from East Prussia to Germany.
Two million made it.
<a href="http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/0502/feature2/?fs=www7.nationalgeographic.com" target="_blank">http://magma.nationa...graphic.com</a>

Cunard's Piers, 92 & 94. Furness Lines Pier 95 visible far left.

Wonderful photos, fellas!

#34 Maverick

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:42 AM

Its funny how many of our photos look similar to one anothers.... Here is United States at dawn, January 1962 as seen at start of family trip on Home Line's Italia to Nassau. Also pix of Italia, (ex Kungsholm, built 1928, scrapped 1965).

#35 Bill Cotter

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 08:30 AM

That first one shows the AT&T building I worked in being built - neat find.

#36 Randy Treadway

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 09:03 AM

The United States Line ship in the dawn picture is America- not United States, whose stern is considerably different (see Bill's picture earlier in this topic).

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SS America


Would you believe that the front half of the wreck of America still exists, where it was abandoned in the Canary Islands?

1994, soon after it grounded
http://www.flare.net/users/e9ee52a/American38.1.jpg

a few months ago
http://www.flare.net/users/e9ee52a/America...gust%202005.htm

sad, but perhaps a bit more artistic than the salvage torch
http://www.flare.net/users/e9ee52a/storm.jpg

#37 MitchS

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 10:36 AM

The future of commercial liners?

<a href="http://www.americanflagship.com/" target="_blank">American Flagship</a>

The president of the company was John Rogers, the man who brought the Carousel to Carousel Park.

Unfortunately I found this:

JOHN ROGERS DEAD. The charismatic Chairman of World City Corporation, John Rogers, has died in New York of myeloma. After a distinguished career as a maritime lawyer - I worked with him on a project in Saudi Arabia in the mid-70s - John spent the past 20 years single-mindedly trying to build a 250,000-GT US-flag cruise ship *** convention center. The design was wonderful, the build strategy was unconventional but practicable and he assembled an astonishing team of high-caliber investors and participants. But the financing always remained just out of reach. Sad. October 9, 2005.
From:http://www.coltoncompany.com/newsandcomment/510.htm

#38 Bill Cotter

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:35 AM

Some more liner shots. Just got this one in last night. It's the famed ILE DE FRANCE, which was the first major liner built after World War I. This shot was taken in August 1958. In November 1958 the liner sailed on it's last cruise.

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Before the ship was scrapped it starred in a disaster move, "The Last Voyage". That film will air on Turner Classic Movies on Feb 11, so liner fans should circle their calendars. More on the ship and a link to a clip from the film can be found here: http://ocean-liners.schuminweb.com/ships/ile-de-france.asp

I thought folks might like to see how travel across the Atlantic could look:

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Anyone like to guess what ship this was?

#39 Randy Treadway

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:47 AM

I had a jet airplane trip not long ago that wasn't much better than that.

By the way, that's the perfect time to play a little deck shuffleboard. If you time it right, you can deliver some wicked hook shots.

Let's see, red funnel with a hint that there's a black band just above the red. That could be a Cunard Line funnel. If so, I'll bet the last two letters of the ship's name are "ia". Do I win a cruise or something?

Actually, the letters attached to the ship's railing are the giveaway- French Line. I'll go with Liberté.
NOW sign me up for the cruise.

#40 Bill Cotter

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:21 PM

Voila, mon aimee.

#41 Maverick

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 01:16 PM

ANY ENGINEERS OUT THERE?? Please help me identify these pix my grandfather took on Italia in January '62. They are remarkable because only a nut would be on a cruise wandering through the engine room snapping photos. Not really the biggest tourist draw. Also, since the ship was built in 1928, and scrapped in 1965, there is probably not machinery like this in existance anywhere anymore. Even the Queen Mary was stripped of mechanicals.

#42 Randy Treadway

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 01:22 PM

Things like gear reduction units and propeller shaft tunnels and bearings and hydraulic rudder linkages would probably be identifiable to somebody who knows what they're looking at, regardless of 1928 technology versus current technology. Okay grease monkeys- have at it!

By the way, the Queen Mary still has a lot of the mechanical stuff down in their engine room tour.
Your Picture #2 looks very similar to some machinery I saw on the Queen Mary.

#43 Mike Kraus

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 05:13 PM

That's all valve gear. Rocker arms a thousand times bigger than in your car!

Best movie ever to show the workings of a marine steam engine was "The Sand Pebbles" (1966).

#44 Randy Treadway

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 06:18 PM

Here's a trivia question for you---

What kind of gas mileage did the Queen Mary get?

Answer: 13 feet to the gallon.
<!--coloro:red--><span style="color:red"><!--/coloro--><!--sizeo:1--><span style="font-size:8pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->source: <a href="http://www.beachcalifornia.com/ship.html" target="_blank">http://www.beachcali...m/ship.html</a><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc--><!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

Of course when you're moving a couple of thousand people, maybe that's not so bad.

#45 MitchS

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 04:42 AM

Gallons per person to go 20 miles:

A family of four going on vacation in a car that gets 20 mpg= 0.25 gallons/person

Queen Mary going 20 miles with 3131 crew and passengers= 2.5 gallons/person
5280/13=406 then 406x20/3131=2.5

Tenfold difference. just a couple going on vacation halves that. Not as bad as I thought.

I am nuts.




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