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Chmnofbrd

Moses VS Jane Parker

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Randy, I agree with most of what you said -especially the part about the critics not getting the point of the more one-of-a-kind pavilions. This has always been strange to me, because I think architecture critics often go the other way too - praising things that are better in a photo taken from an optimum angle than they are when experienced in person. These unique pavilions were designed to be impressive and different from the perspective of the fair goer, and the photos show that, so I think the critics must have had a glass box mindset at the time.

What about Spain? Generally acclaimed, but 40 years later it appears a bit dated to me - more so than any of the "Jetson-like" pavilions (no accounting for taste, I know).

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I agree, Wayne. Spain was a wonderful building, with a very 60's Modern look to it, but I wouldn't rate it any higher than the other great pavilions. Maybe "you had to be there" and walk in, around and through it to really appreciate it.

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I am struck by the praise for the US pavilion. I have an Encyclopedia Britannica Book of the Year for 1964 which offers a multi-page account of the fair. They "evaluate" the architecture and the building which receives the most criticism is the US pavilion whose "translucent skin reminds one of a shower curtain." That's just one opinion of course, but overall, the Fair received criticism because there was no overall design plan as had existed in 1939. I recall the US pavilion and, as a kid, I was impressed by its enormity. However, it did not win the affection of the City of New York and after the Fair closed and it fell victim to vandals and wreckers. Nor did it blaze any new architectural paths (as did the pavilion of the Federal Republic of Germany in Montreal) or serve as a Fair icon (as did the US pavilion in Montreal). That does not mean the 1964 US pavilion was not impressive, massive and suitable for its purpose. It just means that as a showcase for architectural innovation, the Fair did not hit a homerun and the US pavilion slipped into oblivion.

Oh, Britannica's architectural writers did praise the pavilions of Spain, NYS, Austria, Japan and the "world's fair pavilion" which became the Churchill Center in 1965 (four of which, in some form or another, still exist).

PS: I visited the Ireland pavilion with my family and it was small and not particularly impressive as I remember it. It had an outdoor dining area which my parents enjoyed, and in the main hall there was a large map of Ireland with the location of families and clans by county and a PA system which recited the names of each family in an Irish brogue. We stood there until we heard our family name.

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Randy, have you spotted the Jane Parker sign in many photos?

It's in quite a few photos, but this one is as good as any. Getting ready for the parade on Opening Day for the second season- April 21st, 1965.

1-19_Sinclair_Dinoland_float.jpg

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Bands assembled for parades in a paved assembly area that was called the 'parade ground'- it was between the Pavilion of American Interiors and the World's Fair Post Office.

They would then march down the Avenue of Invention, take a right and head down the Avenue of Progress right past Mastro Pizza and the Festival of Gas.

Somewhere back in this area is also where they put in a go-kart track for the '65 season. The go-kart track might have been between the Avenue of Enterprise and Oregon.

All of this area was originally available for Pavilions, but remained as empty lots on the periphery of the Fairgrounds.

The Jane Parker sign is usually seen in the background of photos shot across the Fountain of the Planets, aimed in the general direction of the Travelers Insurance Pavilion.

Parade_map.jpg

By the way, I think this "parade ground" might be where today, they had excavated and put in a foundation for a new community swimming facility, but construction has come to a halt, for unknown reasons (probably funding). So in recent aerial shots, this area is all tore up, but there's nothing going on.

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Drove thru the site yesterday. Looks like work has resumed on the structure going up at the Parade Grounds. Concrete walls are in place.

Not sure if it has been covered already but didn't the Jane Parker site become Taystee Bakery (closed 1992). Now it is a Home Depot.

Not to repeat this, but I love this site!

Pete

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It's my understanding that the structure going up near the old Post Office is a new Ice Skating Rink, isn't that right? Once it's open, the rink in the New York City building- aka UN Headquarters aka QMA, will shut down and the QMA will expand into that space.

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I'll try to stop over at the construction site during the week (I'm on midnights now). Area is fenced off.

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I often wonder, when construction takes place in the Park, if any artifacts from either Fair are ever unearthed. If I correctly read the 1939 NYWF map, the site mentioned above was the approximate location of the pavilions of Venezuela and The League of Nations. And if nothing was built there for 1964, perhaps something that could be directly linked to 1939 might be discovered.

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I did a quick run turough on the way home from work this morning. Sign says FMCP Pool & Rink. Promise photos soon...

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Yeah but how many of you Met fans from the 60's and 70's remember the Zerval Zipper sign on the clock tower in Flushing that you used to see lurking behind left-center field at Shea? I think it is on College Pt Blvd or Main St. That was a landmark! Now it's a UHaul. I'd be amazed if anyone has a photo of the Zerval Zipper clock tower

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Willets Point IRT station around 1939-

is that a Zerval Zipper billboard on the right under the tracks?

mysteryphoto16uw.png

Here's your Zerval clock tower; albeit after the Zerval sign was removed

king1.jpg

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Wow. Great photos Randy. I don't know about the zipper but the JJ Burke coal silo was still there last time I took the 7 from Flushing.

Pete

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Here is the picture you requested.

The Serval Zipper clock tower with the sign, as seen from the Swiss Sky Ride at the World's Fair in 1964.

Serval.jpg

a zoomed-in closeup, albeit a bit grainy....

Serval2.jpg

....which is understandable considering that the original slide was shot from this far away!

Serval3.jpg

Say, maybe those big "curtains" at the Mormon Pavilion (far right side of this slide) weren't intended to block the bakery sign after all, but to block the Zipper sign!

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As long as we're discussing eyesores, what about that big gas storage tank?

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Here is the picture you requested.

The Serval Zipper clock tower with the sign, as seen from the Swiss Sky Ride at the World's Fair in 1964.

Serval.jpg

a zoomed-in closeup, albeit a bit grainy....

Serval2.jpg

....which is understandable considering that the original slide was shot from this far away!

Serval3.jpg

Say, maybe those big "curtains" at the Mormon Pavilion (far right side of this slide) weren't intended to block the bakery sign after all, but to block the Zipper sign!

Wow! That's some spotting! You'd sit in the upper deck at a night game and see the letters of the Serval Zipper sign flashing. Not unlike the flashing of the letters on the Cyclone that you can see down the first base line at Keyspan Park (albeit a much nicer view esoterically and historically).

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