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waynebretl

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas

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Esther (Judy Garland) sings "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" to "Tootie" (Margaret O'Brien), in "Meet Me in St. Louis," on a restored 1957 color TV that probably was still in use during the 1964-65 Fair. Images received through the rabbit ears antenna you see, using a digital/analog converter box, on December 11, 2019.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL!

49206401918_6d1957ef52_c.jpg  49206888241_e1e86ff581_c.jpg

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Most of the small signal tubes are available used or NOS (new old stock) for reasonable prices, although some of the power tubes for the sweep circuits are prized by audiophiles for tube amps, and the prices are elevated.

Picture tubes are really hard to come by, as no one is rebuilding them any more. This set had its picture tube replaced once in its former life; that second one developed a leak and could not be rebuilt successfully. It was one of the last rebuilds at the last place in the U.S., Scotty's Hawkeye CRT in Des Moines IA. The current tube is a good rebuild, GE branded, though it may have actually been made by RCA. The original labels would have had a manufacturer's code. Rebuilding is a high temperature process, and all the original labels got destroyed, because no one thought preserving them would have any value. 

The Early Television Foundation (ETF) in Hilliard, Ohio has collected some rebuilding equipment, and are hoping to get the process going again in a couple of years. One fellow in particular studied the process at the last rebuilder in France, and has successfully rebuilt some monochrome tubes. He has set up an "ETF extension" in his garage out east, and efforts should ramp up in two years when he is out of the Navy. We now have leak-testing gear and the leak in my old tube has been identified. I've volunteered that old tube as the first color tube to be attempted.

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Over the air broadcast digital signals! Free. No compression like cable tv does.

Funny to see how narrow the image is. Like viewing through a paper roll tube. 

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It’s interesting to consider how early television manufacturers tried to make TV sets resemble furniture so they would blend into already established living rooms or dens.  Today, we’ve come full circle.  The room is all about the television.  Flat screens are the size of highway billboards and they form the entire purpose, the focus, of the room.  I’m not at all certain that is any sort of an improvement in our lives.

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15 hours ago, Jim said:

... Today, we’ve come full circle.

... I’m not at all certain that is any sort of an improvement in our lives.

Good observation. It’s a shame but as tv improved, my desire to watch it for news or entertainment has declined to virtually zero. Mine is used for dvds or downloaded movies, the Wii, and... The Simpsons. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, xl5er said:

Good observation. It’s a shame but as tv improved, my desire to watch it for news or entertainment has declined to virtually zero. Mine is used for dvds or downloaded movies. 

I just basically use mine for movies also.  There used to be something called "network" television which when younger I watched, but have absolutely no use for nowadays.

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On 12/14/2019 at 8:55 AM, waynebretl said:

Images received through the rabbit ears antenna you see, using a digital/analog converter box

Wayne,

What kind of antenna do you recommend for digital reception? I had two of those flat, flexible ones at different indoor locations in my Miami house and I switched between them w an amplifier and a splitter. 

My Utah home came w a rooftop pole and a big metal lightning rod style but doesn’t get CBS so no Army Navy Game. 

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48 minutes ago, xl5er said:

Wayne,

What kind of antenna do you recommend for digital reception? I had two of those flat, flexible ones at different indoor locations in my Miami house and I switched between them w an amplifier and a splitter. 

My Utah home came w a rooftop pole and a big metal lightning rod style but doesn’t get CBS so no Army Navy Game. 

Where I'm located, I have direct line of sight to the transmitters on Mount Bigelow, 30 miles away. This means that anything reasonable for the channel frequencies involved generally works, even indoors. (Actually, I was surprised to get indoor reception, because I thought the stucco construction of my house would include wire mesh that would shield the inside of the house.) A reasonable antenna for my case means a small antenna for UHF, but the larger rabbit ear wands for VHF. For my HD sets, I use an amplified antenna that has both a good UHF section and wands for VHF. I use the TERK antenna shown in this video, but I think they don't make it any more. I cannot recommend TERK in general, as they have made some total crap in the past, and I have no idea what their current offerings are like. Not sure how this decent design got into their product line.

Reception on that simple antenna on top of my antique set, in the wrong side of the house, away from the line of sight, seems like a minor miracle.

Most people will be in a worse situation, even if only due to blockage of line of sight by the house across the street. 

I don't know your location or what stations you are trying to pick up. I suggest starting at https://antennaweb.org/ to get a map of station directions, distances and RF channels, with a recommendation of the (minimum) general type of antenna needed. If you have a mixture of VHF and UHF, you probably will need an antenna with the larger elements for optimum VHF. If the stations are in multiple, very different directions, you may need a rotator or a special set up with two antennas and a combiner. Or if the signals are strong enough for indoor reception, you may need to manually adjust the antenna position.

 

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Thanks for that Wayne!

Interesting. Here in 84780 looks like CBS does not broadcast. I thought making signal available was some sort of FCC requirement. 

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I checked another much less user friendly but more detailed site: rabbitears.info

They indicate that St George RF channel 9 carries both MyTV on displayed channel 12.1 (as listed on antennaweb.org),
but also carries the Salt Lake City CBS station KMYU as displayed channel 02-1. 

The detailed info shows the current transmitter as directional with three lobes to the NNE, NNW, and WNW, with a construction permit in effect to change to slightly higher power with lobes to the NNW, NNE, and E.

https://www.rabbitears.info/market.php?request=station_search&callsign=70994#station

Can't tell you if this info is totally up to date, but rabbitears.info usually is. 

You might try scanning your set for it.

As far as FCC reqirements, they only require that the main transmitter covers the licensed market. However, for advertising rate purposes, a station may (and of coursed will) include the population served by repeaters.

 

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