Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks - very beautiful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful. I can remember seeing the ruins of the the original chicken wire, wood and staff Palace of Fine Arts as a child in the early 60s and then the rebuilt structure later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To see this all in color truly brings the exposition to life. I am also struck by the remarkably lush landscaping. It looks as if those buildings had been there for decades rather than just months. These are a wonderful discovery. What was the first exposition to be captured in color photographs? Might it have been this fair?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These views are skillfully colorized---sometimes referred to as 'tinting'. This era in the 19-teens was probably the peak of colorizing black and white photos, and some can look almost like a technicolor image from 40 years later.

I have quite a collection of postcards from this Expo, many of them color. Besides being professionally colorized, I believe all the color ones are printed by lithography, since photogravure wasn't invented yet. They don't have the "glossy" surface that today's postcards have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These views are skillfully colorized---sometimes referred to as 'tinting'. This era in the 19-teens was probably the peak of colorizing black and white photos, and some can look almost like a technicolor image from 40 years later.

I have quite a collection of postcards from this Expo, many of them color. Besides being professionally colorized, I believe all the color ones are printed by lithography, since photogravure wasn't invented yet. They don't have the "glossy" surface that today's postcards have.

Hi Randy,

I'm trying to understand the terminology and process. Richard Benson, in "The Printed Picture" says "The plain one-impression halftone, printed by letterpress, completely dominated mass-produced photographic publications from about 1900 until the refinement of photo offset lithography in the 1960s."

Is it possible these are multi-impression letterpress halftones?

Wayne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen many tinted postal cards and this process continued into the 1940's. There are many tinted varieties of 1939 NYWF cards but none that compare to the ones above. These are truly skillfully done, as Randy states, because they truly fooled me. I thought they were actual photographs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A search on this topic found this site that indicates that nearly every possible technique and combination of techniques was used to produce tinted postcards at one time or another:

http://www.metropostcard.com/techniques0.html

There seems to be one repeated mistake on this site in referring to full color printing as a RGB (red, green, blue) process, when of course it uses subtractive primaries of yellow, cyan, and magenta. (Red, green, blue are the corresponding additive primary colors, and are the colors of the filters used to make the color separations that are subsequently printed in the respective complementary cyan, magenta and yellow inks.) This is commonly called the CMYK process, in which a fourth, black ink (K) impression is used to improve the blacks and detail. In the tinted postcards, the basic image was generally a black ink impression of a monochrome image, either a line image or halftone, and the various tints were then added. The interesting thing is that there were so many combinations of different processes used for the black impression and the colors, including various forms of lithography as well as letterpress. It seems that the processes used in a particular series of postcards has to be determined by examination under high magnification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anything of these buildings remain? Or were they constructed to be very temporary? I saw an earlier reaction about chicken wire & wood?

Lovely pictures though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TobiasV, the only remaining onsite structure is the Palace of Fine Arts (called the Fine Arts Palace in the photos above and only a portion is shown there). It was rebuilt the late 1960s of permanent materials then had extensive repairs done again in the around 2005.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I would bet some of the earlier events were caught in Lumiere Bros. Autochrome, just as the early liners were. The 1925 Paris must certainly exist. It took many years after predicting it online, but color images of both Olympic and Mauretania have surfaced in the last years. I don't claim to know where they are now - but somewhere there may well be color plates of these earlier events. The Autochrome lasted until just after Kodachrome C.1940 - I show one of my three 1939 NYWF Autochromes below the color plates of Paris.

The color night shot below is posted especially for Trey :)

ParisinAnotherEra15.jpg

Paris C. 1914

http://static.messynessychic.com

grand-palais-exposition-1909-autochrome.

Paris 1909 Exposition

http://camyx.com

Autochrome_Paris_early_days_warchildPost

Paris 1912

http://1.bp.blogspot.com

1939 NYWF Dufay Autochrome EKL Collections

post-434-0-41429700-1410249379_thumb.jpg

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guevrekian+1925.jpg

Gabriel Guévrékian, Exposition des Arts Décoratifs, 1925
(autochrome d'Auguste Léon)

RTEmagicC_A045498.jpg.jpg

Pavillon des magasins de la Place Clichy, Paris, 18 juin 1925
Autochrome de Roger Dumas, inv. A 45498.
© Musée Albert-Kahn - Département des Hauts-de-Seine

Best wishes,

Eric

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello :)

I have been looking at this image for about 24 hours now - it sort of blows the T&P away...I enlarged it and brought up the saturation a bit. The gold and purple comets are awesome. I can't make out the bits at the bottom but they appear to be dates (1889 1925) - this may be 1925.

post-434-0-30732500-1410313486_thumb.jpg

Paris Autochrome

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, the stuff that surfaces here - just awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like I may be collecting the wrong fair! Did I say that out loud? But look at that garden from 1925!!!!!!!!!!! Those are the colors of the flowers by the 1939 Hall of Metals up (or down) the Court of Light (or Plaza...I'm getting old), but they work so much better here!

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have quite a few color tinted night views of the 1925 Expo. The Eiffel Tower sported a number of different light schemes over the years. For a while it even served as a giant neon billboard for Citroen automobiles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All,

I did not actually look for 1915 Autochromes but started with 1893. I did look for 1915 tonight. I'm sure there are many more. :) Several in the link which is the source for the image below.

post-434-0-37404600-1410420173_thumb.jpg

Fountain of Energy 1915 San Francisco Pan-American Exposition

http://blog.americanhistory.si.edu/osaycanyousee/2011/02/1915-san-francisco-panama-pacific-international-exposition-in-color.html

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×