Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Randy Treadway

More Escorter detail

Recommended Posts

Just watched the video clip of the Escorter Horn. HOW COOL !!

Does anyone who was at the get together know why it sounded so raspy? Was it the mechanism itself making that noise? If so, I would assume that the rasp would be muffled by the box lid when reassembled.

Or maybe it was just the quality of the speaker you were using?

Good work guys !! And, it looks like a good time was had by all.

Flatlander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched the video clip of the Escorter Horn.  HOW COOL !! 

Does anyone who was at the get together know why it sounded so raspy?  Was it the mechanism itself making that noise?  If so, I would assume that the rasp would be muffled by the box lid when reassembled.

Or maybe it was just the quality of the speaker you were using?

Good work guys !!  And, it looks like a good time was had by all.

Flatlander

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The horn tones were MUCH louder than the sound of the mechanism (although he mechanism was not very quiet - maybe due to the gear box), but I think there is automatic loudness control in the camera that made them more equal.

- - Wayne B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ray emailed me the sound track...

Ray, thanks ol buddy! The Greyhound Escorter horn quacks once again - after a silence of forty years!

LL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Airking,

Thank you for sending the Escorter Box down for us to play with. It was exciting when the first tones started blaring from the speaker. To add to Wayne's wiring hints, I had taken some close up photos of the box and provided some guides to show the connections.

First is a photo of the bottom. The red wire is the positive lead from the battery and comes stratght from the 4-pin male Cinch connector. The negative, or ground, lead of the 12 volt battery is a black wire on the 4-pin connecter and first goes through the fuseholder before going to the rest of the device.

The two orange wires from the 4-pin connector we surmised to be the button or switch that triggered the action. These went directly to the relay.

We did jumper the two points on the fuse holder since the cap did not fit the holder body and make proper contact. You may have to install a new fuseholder or obtain a different cap that fits the existing holder.

The wire marked as "Mysterious" seems to have been added at a later time. This wire is marked "Light Switch" with a piece of masking tape and goes to a lamp inside which shines on some sort of component. We did some theorizing and a couple ideas were kicked around.

One was that maybe it is a sound control that lowers the volume when the Escorter vehicle lights are on? Other than that one the others didn't make any sense, because why do you need a switched light to illuminate the inside of a sealed black box?

The speaker leads (blue and brown) go to the 2-pin female connector and we just jumpered these directly to the speaker. The brown and blue wires come off of the collectors of the two chassis mounted transistors. These must be the final audio drivers and work great.

escort6.jpg

We jumpered the two orange wires that supposedly went to the horn button, but they never started the cycle. Only after we manually tripped the relay by pushing it in did the mechanism move. Upon reviewing my photos I think I found out why.

Look carefully at the photo below. It is a closeup of the wiper and circuit area. Note the trace in the yellow dashed circle. See the trace pointed out as having a break? It looks as if the trace has physically worn out over time as the wiper kept dragging across this area. A bad design? You can see how the foils are torn in the same orientation as the direction of wiper travel.

escort5.jpg

I believe this is why it does not automatically start when the two orange wires are shorted. This line must be fairly important since it provides +12 volts to the center hub which is then transferred to the timing ring and holds the relay closed during the entire horn cycle.

This should be an easy fix. I would drill two small holes on either side of the trace and put a wire jumper in from the reverse side so the wiper did not affect this circuit path anymore.

I hope this helps if you want to monkey with it. If not, I would be happy to do the repairs and get it all configured, tuned, and working. It was a lot of fun to inspect and evaluate. It would be fun to reverse engineer and create a schematic.

One more thing, this stamping on the side indicates that the audio output was preset at 3.25 volts, probably AC RMS. It also verifies the pedigree of the Dukane device.

tag1.jpg

Take care,

Randy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to share another cooool Greyhound piece I have. A 1940's composition "running dog" from the Cleveland, OH Greyhound station. The paint must have been redone 20 years back because it's REALLY old looking. I haven't touched it. It's about 42" long. Imagine this hanging on the wall and a "button" underneath connected directly to the Dukane horn box. That would be neat.

Mathew...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching the DVDs we all bought from Extinct Attractions and in one film (it may have been "To the Fair", a Glide-a-Ride blasted its horn. I was shocked to hear that it was so close to the sound of "our" (AirKing's) DuKane box... and yes... it "quacked" just like ours!

It wasn't in exact tune either, so I'd recommend that you guys leave it slightly out of tune in order to be authentic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug...Sounds like a "tough" call. Sort of like restoring an old cadillac to "original specs" or making the doors all fit better than new!!!

I'm still in awe of this whole scenario. The ultimate Greyhound story!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, guys and gals. Just received the Dukane horn box back from Randy L. I really missed it. I hooked it up to my 12V converter in the house. It works flawlessly. Randy hooked up a toggle switch for HI/LO volume and a pushbutton to start things off. He even made a schematic of the unit. WOW!!!

It really sounds good. I even tried it through some bigger speakers and it sounded even better. I'm very thankful for everyone's hard work and I'm glad to have been a part of this very special moment.

Thanks again, Mathew...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About that circuit board with the ripped trace, I can draw up and etch a replacement if thats what it takes to get any more going.

Look like you have some TO-3 power transistors in that circuit also

Thats a commom problem on those older sequence controllers, if you can "Pen" the frequencys of the tones you can just use a standard $15 guitar tuner (with built in mic) to tweak the pots.

Its out of tune, but still FANTASTIC !

Looking at the PCB:

I see many diodes also the pots wiper and lead share one common rail, looks like it could be tuned VCO circuit. Soft sounding "musical" germanium transistors

That 330 Ohm resistor is likley used to set a bias or tuning range

To transistors next to the transformer are the audio outputs in a push pull transformer coupled confuguration.

I rebuild audio consoles, guitar amps, tour playing guitar and bass

-Joe L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A SECOND DUKANE GREYHOUND ESCORTER HORN BOX HAS BEEN FOUND !!!

And, it's slated to return to its rightful home, bolted on the firewall of a restored Escorter.

After months of being glued to every message on this forum about the discovery, documentation and repair of the first Escorter horn late last year, right in the middle of negotiating with Mathew to purchase it and drooling over the possibility of having an original horn for the Escorter, what appeared to be another one (what are the odds) popped up last May in an obscure listing on Ebay and ran almost without notice. The model number was the same, so I placed a ridiculously high bid, ended up as the only bidder and bought it for a song. When the box arrived several long days later, I opened it up, flipped it over and found the “Escorter” placard.

It was almost as exciting as winning the lottery !!

post-3804-1217937337_thumb.png AuroraBrochure.pdf

Since shortly after taking possession of this prize, it’s been in the hands of our friend Randy L. who has to be, at this point, the world’s foremost authority on Dukane Musical Horns. Randy graciously agreed to perform a second test, repair and tune job.

The horn arrived back home today, equipped with a few new circuit components, wired and complete with detailed hookup instructions; ready for installation. Many thanks to Randy for his efforts (he actually thanked me for the opportunity if you can believe that).

When finally complete, the restored Escorter will not only move on its own, but will now be able to quack like it did on its first day at Flushing Meadows.

“Go Greyhound…And Leave The Driving To Us”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations on the rare find!!!! (and we ALL thank Randy L. for his technical assistance).

We're all looking forward to seeing your Escorter spin donuts and quack. I wish we all could contribute in some other way. (we're still watching for any info about that control panel 'hole' behind the steering wheel).

Maybe some day I can ride in the front seat- something which my parents couldn't afford back in 1964.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice grab on the horn box!! I was on my way to the Philippines the day that info was posted. Wow, of all places to find one. I searched a lot on eBay but never found one. I'm actually very happy since I was growing very fond of mine and will now build a special cabinet for it to be displayed underneath my running dog mascot. Don't forget to post more photos of the escorter as work is done on it.

COOOOOOOOOOL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I scanned this slide last night. Somebody was impressed enough to shoot a closeup photo of an Escorter in late '64. Still no dashboard view though.

An excellent look at how the upholstery was stitched, for that restoration job.

64-09-35-35_Greyhound_Escorter.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×