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Plumber

Food vendors??

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The Autopub (?) was it? On 59th and Fifth.

That and the Burlington Mills exhibit on 54th and 6th always had that Worlds Fair feel.

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<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->I remember eating in a resturant somewhere in the city that was full of real cars...on the ceiling, on the walls, on the floor and the tables where in the cars to eat - what/where was that?<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Yeah, Autopub, basement of GM building in NYC. Had race cars hanging from the ceiling and you sat in booths that were modeled after car interiors complete with steering wheels.

For more info on this landmark, visit:

<a href="http://www.thecityreview.com/gm.html" target="_blank">http://www.thecityreview.com/gm.html</a>

Randy.

[This message has been edited by AMFMonorail (edited 01-28-2003).]

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Tad's Steak House made a big impression on me and my family back during our visit to the fair in mid-May '64. At that time my parents were struggling to operate a small country hotel in southwestern New Hampshire and one part of their offering was having the first all-you-can-eat buffet dinner on Saturday nights in that part of the state. In New York we stayed at the Hotel Chesterfield on, I believe, 47th Street, right near Rockerfeller Center and Times Square (long since demolished for the McGraw-Hill towers). We ended up eating at least two meals at Tad's (I think the 42nd Street location), and I can still remember the experience of watching the steaks grilled in front of us. My Dad was so impressed that after we returned home to New Hampshire he tore out a section of wall between the hotel kitchen and dining room and built a brick gas fired grill so that he could add grilled steaks to the buffet offering. That helped build up the buffet business for a while, but once buffet style meals began to be common place, my parents gave up and several years later shut down the hotel to convert it to apartments.

The steaks may have been thin, but to my nine-year-old country palate, I thought them to be quite tasty and I can still remember being very impressed with the salad dressing.

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Until the late '60s a restaurant didn't have to do much to be different. Almost all eating places had the same approach. I remember when "smorgasbord" came along and was considered a big deal. Then the fast food/theme park mentality exploded.

Tad's is still pushing the "grilled in front of you" thing as a key selling point.

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My very first experience with a salmonella bar (salad bar) was at some place on W. 85th Street back in the early 70's. That wave soon washed across the country as I recall. In our area of Ohio, about the only place left that still has a salad bar is Pondergrossa.

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<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gene:

Until the late '60s a restaurant didn't have to do much to be different. Almost all eating places had the same approach. I remember when "smorgasbord" came along and was considered a big deal. Then the fast food/theme park mentality exploded.

Tad's is still pushing the "grilled in front of you" thing as a key selling point.<HR></blockquote>

The first "grilled in front of you" restaurant I can remember was Bonanza restaraunts. Any one remember those?

I never could figure how these got so popular, when i go to a restaurant i dont want to stand in a line as i pick out what I want, i want to be seated and be waited on. Golden Corral is still set up like this. Out here in OK, people are really into the all you can eat thing, and going to our Golden Corral is similar to seeing a herd of cattle at a trough.

I pass. LOL

------------------

Peace

[This message has been edited by RocketThrower (edited 01-30-2003).]

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I remember Bonanza's or at least the tv advertisements. I thought they were still around.

NYCers like to sit down too-one reason there is only a handful of Tad's around now.

My all-time winner though is a local chain I wandered into outside the huge Navy base in Norfolk, VA- the Grate House. There you sit down and order a steak from the menu. They bring it out to you and then you take it to a big flaming grill in the middle of the dining room where you cook it yourself. The place was packed but I couldn't figure out how this differed from barbecuing at home.

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I think several PTUers recalled Chicken Delight's delivery service in the NYC area at the time (with a plastic chicken on the roof of the deliveryman's car)

The jingle was 'Don't cook tonight...call CHICKEN DELIGHT!"

What a nice thread. I work in the old GM Building on 57th and Broadway and love the idea that there was an Automat here.

I remember eating at the Autopub in the '70s. We sat in one of the car booths and they gave us some balloons with car graphics on it. Our next stop was Tiffany's where we let the balloons loose! tongue.gif

There are still a handful of good Jewish delis in Manhattan...Katz' and the 2nd Ave. Deli are downtown plus Carnegie is midtown.

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That cook your own steak sounds a little too much like the Seinfeld bit where Kramer suggests the "Make your own pizza" parlor," You mixit, you pound it, you toss it up in the air...add your own sauce, cheese and soices and...slide it in the oven...Can't miss!"

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Hey Afi, did you ever have "Breakfast at Tiffany's"? (That movie had a great 60's feel to it!)

My dad worked at the Leica camera showroom, directly across 5th Ave. from Tiffany's, in the 1930's. So that section of 5th has a special place in my heart.

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Yessong, it's still there (or someplace like it):

<a href="http://norfolk.citysearch.com/profile/10599728/" target="_blank">http://norfolk.citysearch.com/profile/10599728/</a>

The locals (mostly Navy families) were loving it when I was there. Bring your big BBQ gloves! My theory on this place is that the Navy people get so sick of eating cafeteria and shipboard food that getting their hands into the cooking has a special appeal. A principle that could be applied to future World's Fairs, perhaps.

[This message has been edited by Gene (edited 02-01-2003).]

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Gene wrote, "For truly excellent franks in NYC try the independant Gray's Papaya or Papaya King on 86th Street and Lexington Ave."

When I come to NY, I like to get Nathans franks because I can slop on a ton of sauerkraut, and it's good sauerkraut, too, and I love sauerkraut - plus Nathans is the only place that I know of that knows how to make good french fries.

But Grey's Papaya and Papaya King have this great papaya juice, and I don't know where to find that anyplace else in the country. Where can I get that great papaya juice, outside of east or west 86th streets in Manhattan? Or maybe someone knows the secret recipe? Cut up papaya, put it in a juicer...I dunno...whaddya think? I once tried putting papaya in a blender. Forgeddaboutit, as they say in Brooklyn.

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Originally posted by c318137:

There is a web site that lists the "most secret" recipes in American restauranting, and KFC (11 herbs & spices) is #1- supposedly locked in an underground vault in Kentucky, and Orange Julius is #2.

Randy

I've now come across photo evidence that Orange Julius was sold inside the Fairgrounds in July '64.

It's on Bill Cotter's Photo Disc #1, Set 3, Picture #14 (labeled Monorail).

We can thank Bill for scanning these in High Res., or we wouldn't be able to discern these kind of details.

Just outside the Texas Pavilion there is what appears to be a refreshment area, and there is a banner hanging there that says Orange Julius.

Do any of you remember buying an Orange Julius at the Fair?

Randy

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I didn't realize people were looking for that info. Besides that stand at the Texas Pavilion I believe I have seen other signs for Orange Julius as well. If I spot them in my various scanning projects I'll post a note - or Randy, jump in if you see it before I do.

Just spotted another one of that same stand with "Orange Julius" on the roof, advertising to monorail riders.

[This message has been edited by billcotter (edited 05-03-2003).]

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My first trip to New York City was in the summer of 1950. (Anybody else here remember that year??)

My New York friend took me to ROMEO'S, 1625 Broadway (near 50th St.) for ravioli that has never been equalled since. It was 50 cents plus a dime for a tall glass of cold milk.

Then there was the AUTOMAT where the change person in the booth never made a mistake when she threw out exactly 20 nickels for your dollar bill. The pies were 15 cents and a cup of tea was a nickel. I remember seeing a guy making free lemonade with the lemon slices that went with the tea, pouring in free ice water from the tap then adding free sugar from the dispenser on the table. He brought his own glass, daily I assume.

Then there was The STAGE DELICATESSEN (7th Ave. near 53rd as I recollect) where the proprieter, Max Asnas came to my table and sat down with me and started telling New York jokes and reading funny limericks. He was written up every other week in the Walter Winchell column in the N.Y. Daily Mirror. His world famed corned beef on rye sandwich and a huge dill pickle went for less than a dollar.

Jules Podell's COPACABANA (10 East 60th) had a $3.50 minimum on week nights and you got to see a great floor show along with dinner featuring the COPA GIRLS and a big name main act (Joe E. Lewis) and a live orchestra for dancing.

In later years, Mama Leone's became my favorite Italian restaurant... great LASAGNA!!!

My first (and last) visit to a Tad's Steak House on Broadway took about an hour of our day to chew through one of the toughest steaks ever served anywhere. The $1.29 price was a ripoff!!

At The Fair, my favorites were A) Spanish Pavilion Top O' The Fair C) BEL-GEM and C) The great shish kebab served at the Pakistan Restaurant.

I never left The Fair without consuming at least two belgian waffles. I can still smell the aroma while standing at the counter waiting my turn.

Anybody else here old enough to remember some of those N.Y. highlights as I listed here?

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Sorry, Ray... born in 1952 so I can't compete with THOSE memories, however...

The Automats WERE just about the coolest place to eat in New York for a kid from Salem, New Hampshire! And we didn't have ANYTHING as spectacular as a Tad's at home so Tad's was a big thrill, too.

I remember staying at the Taft Hotel on 7th Ave., just outside of Times Square, for the 1964 Fair and at the spankin' new City Squire (also on 7th, I think) for our 1965 visit.

I also remember looking across at the also-brand-new Americana Hotel and wondering who those rich people were that could stay at such a contemporary and snazzy hotel. SURELY, I thought, THESE must be the people that take those private Glide-a-Ride Escorter tours at the Fair!

One evening, we went for a fancy dinner in the dining room at the Taft. My parents danced to the live music of Guy Lombardo and his orchestra. My sister and I were shocked - and I really mean SHOCKED - when a lady came over to compliment my parents on their dancing prowess. We had never seen our tea-totaling parents in this light and CERTAINLY had never seen them dancing in a swanky New York dinner-lounge atmosphere in our 12 and 14 years on this planet!

To this day I can't believe that was my born-in-New Hampshire-on the-kitchen-table dad, glissading across the dance floor that night!

On the days we didn't go to the Fair, I would run around to the several hotels in the immediate area and collect the free tickets to the television shows that were filming that day. The tickets were always sitting in stacks around the Bell and Concierge desks. - free for the taking.

While my mother and sister went shopping, my father and I went to several TV show tapings.

I remember specifically being in the audiences of the Match Game, Jeopardy (with Art Fleming) and To Tell The Truth... and I know there were several others. It was like you became buddies with Don Pardo since he did the "warm up" for all of the game shows!

We never took public transportation to the Fair. We always took the family station wagon out of the hotel parking garage and drove to Queens. I sure wish now that we had taken the World's Fair Train out of Times Square to the Fair at least once!

Boy, we sure had a good time those two weeks... April school vacation in 1964 and 1965!

Hey everybody... where did YOUR family stay when YOU came to the Fair?

[This message has been edited by DougSeed (edited 05-23-2003).]

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<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DougSeed:

Hey everybody... where did YOUR family stay when YOU came to the Fair?<HR></blockquote>

Either the Roosevelt or the Knickerbocker, can't remember which, but I tend to think the latter.

Same thing as your family- retrieved the family station wagon from the Hotel garage to drive out to the Fair, and parked in the Shea Stadium parking lot, walking in through the main entrance.

Don't remember much about the hotel (only stayed there one night), except that in the room it had steam heat in an old-style wall radiator with what looked like heavy "iron" coils.

And there was a portable black & white TV in the room. I think that's the first time I ever stayed in a hotel or motel room with a television in it. I remember watching cartoons.

Randy

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No fancy, or otherwise, hotels for my family. We stayed with my Aunt and Uncle. They lived in New Jersey.

My Aunt and Uncle lived exotic enough life's to me. (They actually owned a home! This alone, to a kid growing up in a tenement in a failing mill town, was posh.) I can't imagine what I might have thought of a hotel in Manhattan.

My father drove somewhere in the city and then took the subway to the fair grounds. I remember subway well, although, I don't recall where my father parked, or where we boarded the subway.

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I went to the Fair twice, each time for the weekend: once in summer 64 and once in summer 65. My grandfather and father were both from NYC, so they pretty much knew their way around.

In 1964 my family stayed with my father's cousin at their house in Queens. My parents dumped my 3-month old sister with them, and we drove our 1960 Impala to the Fairgrounds where we parked under the LIE. The only places we ate were Brass Rail and Schaefer, mostly Brass Rail. (We weren't poor, but for some reason, not spending money was a real priority.)

In 1965, I went with my grandfather when his company (the Phila. Inquirer) took the newsboys to the Fair. We took the train up from Philly, stayed in a hotel I remember as being the New Yorker (Manhattan?), and took the subway from a station under the hotel(!) to the Fairgrounds. My grandfather placed no limits on what we could spend and do. I remember going to breakfast at the hotel that first morning and having blueberry pancakes for breakfast!! NO WAY would I EVER have been allowed to order that with my father at the table! I couldn't sleep that first night in the hotel because I was so excited about going to the Fair. However, the SECOND night, I was so exhausted I could barely get up the next morning.

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Hi Plummer, My father opened the Mastro Pizza Pavilian as a way to introduce Pizza as a franchisable restaraunt. He was in the business because his father invented the gas pizza oven. Unfortunately, my father died the night of the blackout (11/9/65) and so did Mastro Pizza.

By the way, there are still a few Mastro pizza ovens out there. If you spot one and can get me the name plate, I'd certainly appreciate it.

Regards,

Vinnie

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Plumber:

I read in Pizza Marketing Quarterly where the last Mastro Pizza location in New York has now been re-opened by JADA Pizza Corp. at 224 W. 238 St. in the Bronx. My question is...was Mastro at one time a large local chain or was it a one location business? Are there any other Mastro units in the NY area?<HR></blockquote>

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Welcome to PTU, Vinnie. All of us here enjoy tracing things from the Fair (as you can see).

It seems that your father had the vision of DOMINO'S® way before Dominic! So many of us have been recalling the '65 blackout in the last few days. Wow. God rest your Dad.

MastroPizzaCouponsmall.jpg

-Richard

[This message has been edited by Park Bench (edited 08-19-2003).]

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Let's see now, according to the map on the coupon:

1. You buy your pizza

2. The Mormons bless it

3. You drown it with a Coke

4. You produce a entire festival of gas.

5. Then everybody is supposed to crowd into people-to-people.

6. Since by now you feel totally bloated, gassed and squeezed, you need the IBM People Wall to give you a lift.

Sounds great! biggrin.gif

{where was that Pepto Bismol Pavilion?)

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Vinnie, Welcome to PTU! Nice to have someone aboard with a direct connection to one of the pavilions.

In the course of my daily activity I often see a good deal of restaurant equipment, I can't say that I have yet run across a Mastro oven, mostly Blodgett ones. I will keep an eye out for Mastro now that I have a good reason to find one.

Got any good sauce recipes you might want to share?? The only pizza we can get here in this part of the midwest has a crust as thick as a book, and sauce that tastes like.... well terrible!

Plumber

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