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Looks like a fun day!

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cotton-candy.jpg

Don't you think these kids would agree? Not only are they wearing buttons to mark their attendance at the 1962 Seattle World's Fair, but the cotton candy looks great! This is part of what I enjoy about the fairs. The major pavilions and shows are fun, of course, but sometimes it's the simple things that make the day special.

By the way, the vending machines behind them were a big deal at the 1962 Fair. Being able to buy a meal, especially a hot one, from a machine was something new, and the Fair organizers made a big thing out of it. Personally I prefer freshly prepared food to something that has been sitting there for hours, but some people seem to prefer speed over quality. These snack bars must have been heaven to them.

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The novelty of the new 'pushbutton age'. A less cynical time when people were still fascinated by futuristic machines.

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Hey Bill, would you happen to have an image of those badges?

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button.jpg

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Blue jeans (dungarees as they were called then) weren't all that common back in the 60's, and were rarely seen in any of these old photos.

So it's surprising that both these boys are wearing them here.

Also, think of how time has flown - both of these kids are now in their mid fifties and are approaching retirement age.

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Oh, jeans- or dungarees- were very popular in the 60's and my brothers and I wore them to school all the time. We weren't allowed to wear them to church though. And it's been discussed many times on this board how, in so many World's Fair photos, it looks like parents made their kids dress as if they were going to church.

This particular picture brings two recollections to mind.

1. The rolled up cuffs at the bottom of the jeans. This was so you could 'grow into them'. Either they were bought big, or they were a hand-me-down from an older sibling. In this case it looks like BOTH the boys have rolled up cuffs.

2. I'm guessing that underneath the knees on the jeans of both these boys, mom has applied one of those 'iron-on patches' to stiffen the material for wear. Sometimes used also to patch holes.

Looks like it's none too late- the younger of the two is already working on a hole in the knee of one leg. :D

The knees of the jeans on both these kids look so stiff that today you might guess they're wearing soccer shin guards. But back then it was probably those iron-on patches applied to the underside of the material.

Remember when it was the style to button your shirt all the way up to your adam's apple?

This was before it became the sign of a nerd or dufus. :)

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I agree with Randy - Mom and Dad weren't going to buy a lot of good pants for these boys (except for places like church) until they stopped wearing holes in the knees. By the way, what is all that stuff in the man's shirt pockets?

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Glasses in his right pocket, sun glasses in his left.

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Here's another shot of the kids enjoying themselves at Century 21. This was at Chun King, which was busy introducing Chinese food to the American masses.

rickshaw.jpg

I wonder if there are any Chung King restaurants anywhere today?

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Anyone know the name of this ride?

unknown-ride.jpg

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If Chun King didn't refurbish the same rickshaw for use two years later in New York, it sure is darn close.

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I don't think they're the same one, Randy. On this one the front poles look like they're attached under the area for the riders feet. In NY they attach on the sides. NY also had a striped canopy, although that was probably easily interchanged. The whole pulling mechanism just looks different to me.

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Thanks. I remember riding those as a kid. The map in the guidebook doesn't show a Whip entry; anyone know what they might have called it in Seattle?

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I believe it was called the Space Whirl.

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Thanks!

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Here's another shot of the kids enjoying themselves at Century 21. This was at Chun King, which was busy introducing Chinese food to the American masses.

rickshaw.jpg

Hey, remember the "Around the World" miniature golf course in Lake George, NY that has the Paul Bunyan from the '64 world's fair? Well, a few holes later, there's an antique rickshaw! I wonder if that was a post-fair purchase, too? It's in the very back of this photo of Paul Bunyan, to the left of the Mexican hat, beyond the cactus. You can easily see the guy pulling it, but the rickshaw is hard to make out behind him, and it's cut off by the tree.

Here's Paul, looking good 40 years after the Fair, but check out the sign that's by he feet! We know he's from '64, but the sign has the T&P. That's how history gets rewritten.

post-86-126909911358_thumb.jpg post-86-126909926789_thumb.jpg post-86-126910014846_thumb.jpg

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Here is the 1964 NYWF Chun King version, for comparison to their Seattle 1962 rickshaw, and comparison to the one at Lake George.

It looks like the canopy color might be the same as Lake George, although I can't imagine the fabric being the same surviving outdoors almost 50 years.

009_-_Chun_King_rickshaw.jpg

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Here are three photos that Doug took of the rickshaw at Lake George. using the camera in his phone.

Could be the one from the Lake Amusement area-- it's the same people who bought the Muffler Man (Oregon Timber Carnival).

Of course the fabric awning is different, as is the seat upholstery.

The main other difference seems to be that the Lake George people installed the pull yoke upside down. In both the 1962 pictures and the 1964-65 pictures, the little "cows horn" things on the end of the yoke are pointed down, to act as a rest when you set the yoke down on the ground. Having them point up is an installation error.

The hardware for the pull yoke attachment points seem to be mounted upside down as well.

0529001951.jpg

0529001951a.jpg

0529001952.jpg

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Sure looks the same to me, other than the upside-down handle.

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I do see another small difference besides the upside down parts--

The Chun King rickshaw had a foot board (the board at the very front of the 'wagon') that looks about a half inch taller than the side boards of the 'box'. This is confirmed in other Chun King pictures from '64 and '65.

The one at Lake George has a footboard that's the same height as the side boards.

Of course that doesn't rule anything out. With this being 'out in the weather', probably *all* the wood parts have had to be replaced at one time or another.

The upholstery is not only a different color, but 'shaped' differently at the front of the armrest.

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Thanks for posting those pix for me, Randy.

The radius on the fenders is different than the one in Randy's photo, too.

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If Chun King didn't refurbish the same rickshaw for use two years later in New York, it sure is darn close.

Randy- I thought you would enjoy this find I just made. Not only did Chun King recycle this rickshaw to the 1964 NY Fair, but they managed to leave the Seattle name plate on it!

chun-king-rickshaw.jpg

There may have been two rickshaws in NY, as I have shots showing a different wooden framework, different canopy design and in a completely different spot. You posted one earlier but I'll re-post for easier comparison. Both slides are dated July 1964.

chun-king-rickshaw-2.jpg

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