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'SOME RANDOM PHOTOS'

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They pumped water into pressure into it. It would then come out under pressure, stepping up the hydrant pressure. A sphere is easier to build and use than a box as there are no seams to burst from the pressure.

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When I make an error (and I have made many), I'm the first to admit it!

In this case, two were made; my spelling of Ahrens Fox was incorrect and my information on the World's Fair trucks was partially incorrect.

As you can see below, three Ahrens Fox pumpers were specifically bought for the Fair but I knew they had a connection with the city and that connection was the fact that after the Fair they were purchased by the City along with several others of the same model.

"The World's Fair also purchased three Ahrens-Fox centrifugal pumpers built on Schacht chassis, which were delivered on April 20, 1938. These units were designated SC models, had closed cabs, Hercules engines, Hale pumps rated at 500 gpm at 120 psi, carried serial numbers 9043 through 9045, and were much smaller than the pumpers being purchased by New York at the time, having a wheelbase of 168.5 inches and an overall length of 21 feet 9 inches. Their cost was $5700 each".

I will look further into this matter because I do think some NYC equipment was involved with the Fair per an old friend of mine who was a retired FDNY Lieutenant in charge of equipment maintenance.

Mr. 'L'

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Thank you for that first mention I have encountered of the Upside Down Building! Photos are hard to come by.

Seems like there is a book I have to buy, published by Arcadia. Hmm, sounds familiar.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Zh2gPdJsBFQC&pg=PA67&lpg=PA67&dq=upside+down+building+queensboro&source=bl&ots=jVaCnDS5UR&sig=YM4-5wdGcZoBdlusoluUTy3tGq0&hl=en&ei=IAziSvC6OMml8AbgtZH3AQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBsQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=upside%20down%20building%20queensboro&f=false

I said it was razed "kinda-recently" by which I guessed the 90s. I was surprised to learn it was torn down way back in 1970. But my guess of 8 stories was good.

Walking that bridge was a true urban adventure. It vibrated like a hardware store paint shaker. Until the reconstruction, the 1960s pedestrian walkway was built as such, and was on the south side above the trolley, not the repurposed former trolley path/auto lane on the north side as is used today. And that suspended catwalk under the roadbed to the bldg. was more amusement ride than mundane commuter link.

Your post led me to some great photos of the trolleys and the Manhattan barn. I had given up looking for them. http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?46225

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When I make an error (and I have made many), I'm the first to admit it!

In this case, two were made; my spelling of Ahrens Fox was incorrect and my information on the World's Fair trucks was partially incorrect.

As you can see below, three Ahrens Fox pumpers were specifically bought for the Fair but I knew they had a connection with the city and that connection was the fact that after the Fair they were purchased by the City along with several others of the same model.

"The World's Fair also purchased three Ahrens-Fox centrifugal pumpers built on Schacht chassis, which were delivered on April 20, 1938. These units were designated SC models, had closed cabs, Hercules engines, Hale pumps rated at 500 gpm at 120 psi, carried serial numbers 9043 through 9045, and were much smaller than the pumpers being purchased by New York at the time, having a wheelbase of 168.5 inches and an overall length of 21 feet 9 inches. Their cost was $5700 each".

I will look further into this matter because I do think some NYC equipment was involved with the Fair per an old friend of mine who was a retired FDNY Lieutenant in charge of equipment maintenance.

Mr. 'L'

Hi Mr. 'L',

I don't know if this is of interest, but of the photographs I have of the Fair on fire, the construction fires show very different engines - but they would as they predate the purchase date you mentioned. Working from memory some of the photographs I have of fires after the date you mentioned may not show just these engines. I am thinking of the fire at Ballantines and some others whose subjects I can't recall orther than the fires.

Best and thanks again,

Eric

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Here's the rest of the story;

"At the conclusion of the 1939-1940 World's Fair, the Fair's five Ahrens-Fox pumpers (two HT models and three SC models) were turned over to the department. The two HT models were assigned as regular apparatus of engine companies. However, the three smaller SC models begin another chapter in New York's Ahrens-Fox history. These rigs were assigned as the second piece (hose wagon) of engine companies. One (9043) had an overhead ladder rack added to carry a portable 35-foot metal extension ladder, an innovation at the time. Another (9045) was equipped with a bank of eight manifolded carbon dioxide cylinders, each with a capacity of fifty pounds, and two hose reels, each having 1000 feet of one-inch hose to discharge the carbon dioxide. The conversion of this unit was accomplished by the Carbon Dioxide Fire Equipment Company of Newark, New Jersey, in 1941 and was "state-of-the-art" for airport fire protection at that time. The "new" crash truck was assigned to the LaGuardia Airport Crash Unit on April 19, 1941. When the New York Port Authority assumed responsibility for aircraft crash-fire-rescue at the city's airports, this rig was reconverted back into a pumper".

Mr. 'L'

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Some more Jimmie Lynch!

BTW; the two Borden's DIVCO's were probably borrowed from the milk company's exhibit, and guess who the little man being chauffeured around in the Crosley was! (no, it's not Lou Costello).

Enjoy,

Photos borrowed for educational purposes only.

Mr. 'L'

WORLDSFAIR43.jpg

WORLDSFAIR44.jpg

WORLDSFAIR45.jpg

WORLDSFAIR46.jpg

WORLDSFAIR47.jpg

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Whalen in the back seat, Laguardia in the front passenger seat?

Sure looks like Fiorello to me.

I assume the demolition derby photos are from the 1940 season when entertainment was decidedly more low-brow than 1939.

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Just look at the thickness of the passenger door on that Crosley. Can you imagine how it would fare in today's NHTSA side crash tests? LOL

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Another gem of a 39/40 World's Fair image comes to us from New England;

Pictured is a 1927 Twin Coach Model 37-R operating for the Berkshire Street Railway Company of Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

While the bus itself is a piece of history in its own right, the focus is on the interesting bumper sign advertising The New York World's Fair Savings Club sponsored by the Berkshire County Savings Bank.

The Street Railway Company and the bank partnered in the venture and those savers who accumulated enough funds in their accounts were entitled to free transportation to the Fair (on Berkshire buses)upon its opening.

I would have to tell you that that would have been one 150 mile trip that I wouldn't have wanted to take in the heat of the summer without air conditioning!

The Berkshire Street Railway was a wholly owned subsidiary of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad and operated routes up and down the western boarder of the sate.

Many thanks to the Motor Bus Society for the use of the image.

Mr. Linsky - Green Bus Lines, Inc., Jamaica, NY

BdsO6OWkKGrHqUH-EEErf3cGqTBK6DfrYFU.jpg

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post-1280-125774900245_thumb.jpg

Looks like my wife's driving! :lol: Driving like kamikazi pilot comes naturally to her. :P

Lucky for me she doesn't read these posts otherwise this wouldn't too funny when she gets home.

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An ironic event: At the conclusion of the fair, the little trylon and perisphere in Times Square became a recruiting booth for the military. That is one of the best photographs of the WF info booth in Times Square that I have seen.

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An ironic event: At the conclusion of the fair, the little trylon and perisphere in Times Square became a recruiting booth for the military. That is one of the best photographs of the WF info booth in Times Square that I have seen.

How Ironic, I did not know that. To add to the Irony, don't forget that the metal from the Theme Centre was smelted down into bullets and rivets for the War.

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How Ironic, I did not know that. To add to the Irony, don't forget that the metal from the Theme Centre was smelted down into bullets and rivets for the War.

OT.

Since we're talking about melting down and ironies, the most horrific irony of all was the tearing down of the Second Avenue elevated line in Manhattan before the war and selling the steel to Japan who promptly re-delivered to us in the form of bombs over Pearl Harbor!

Mr. 'L'

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OT.

Since we're talking about melting down and ironies, the most horrific irony of all was the tearing down of the Second Avenue elevated line in Manhattan before the war and selling the steel to Japan who promptly re-delivered to us in the form of bombs over Pearl Harbor!

Mr. 'L'

Ok- so the Japanese were sneaky and resourceful.

The Japanese were known for copying anything and everything.

Might as well learn from and copy them:

http://www.ussnewyork.com/

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Ok- so the Japanese were sneaky and resourceful.

The Japanese were known for copying anything and everything.

Might as well learn from and copy them:

http://www.ussnewyork.com/

OFF TOPIC

You are correct; while the Russians tried copying everything including our Cadillacs, Packards and GM Buses with not a great deal of success, and the English took the easy way out by just 'buying American', the Japaneses also copied - but there was one difference; whatever they copied, they made better than what they were copying - their cameras and eventually their automobiles more than prove that.

Mr. 'L'

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Since you all like the Trylon and Perisphere Information and Ticket Booths spread about the city during the Fair, I found another interesting image taken at either the New York or New Jersey side of the Lincoln Tunnel.

Enjoy.

Photo courtesy of the New York City Archives.

Mr. Linsky - Green Bus Lines, Inc., Jamaica, NY

WORLDSFAIRLINCTUNNEL.jpg

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In addition to the Long Island Railroad and the New York City Independent Subway lines serving the 39/40 World's Fair there was a direct route from Manhattan Via the Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) system from the Second Avenue El over the Queensborough Bridge and through Flushing.

Pictured below in an image taken in 1940, we see a busy IRT Station at the Fair.

Not long after the fair ended, the line was torn down with the steel from which being sold to Japan!

Photo courtesy of the Chales Warren Collection.

Mr. Linsky - Green Bus Lines, Inc., Jamaica, New York

post-3863-0-66612400-1301208196_thumb.jp

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In this 1937 shot taken at the site of what was to become the City of New York Pavillion, we see the then Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia at the levers of a Lima Locomotive and Shovel Cran rig symbolically breaking ground for the beginning of construction.

Grover Whalen, President of the World's Fair Corporation looks on.

Photo courtesy of the Queens Borough Public Library.

Mr. Linsky - Green Bus Lines, Inc., Jamaica, New York

WORLDSFAIRLAGUARDIALIMACRANE_zpsd925283b

post-3863-0-75571800-1370850382_thumb.jp

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Thanks for the excellent comments explaining the photos! My company is publishing a reproduction of the original map of the '39 Fair and this site has been very helpful in understanding things you just don't see anymore like pulling a car with teeth! I Tweeted a pic (@ShirePublisher) and link to share it.

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