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TDH5303

'SOME RANDOM PHOTOS'

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I was thumbing through my vast collection of odds and ends and found a few images that I thought you would all enjoy.

Explanations upon request but do notice the front license plate on the parade Cadillac in picture number 6.

Photos borrowed for educational purposes only.

Mr. 'L' (TDH5303)

WORLDSFAIRFORDWAGON.jpg

WORLDSFAIR17.jpg

WORLDSFAIR18.jpg

WORLDSFAIR6.jpg

WORLDSFAIR16.jpg

WORLDSFAIRAUTOPARADE.jpg

WORLDSFAIR40PLATE.jpg

GREYHOUNDTRAIN3-1.jpg

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Hello,

Nice photographs, especially the Info booth in Times Square. I do not have my glasses on, but that looks like Grover Whalen driving in the last photo. Great stuff!

Best wishes,

Eric

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The Information booth in Times Square is hard to come by, nice to see some unfamiliar views!

Also, thats a great shot of the Bridge of Tomorrow crossing over to the Administration building, First Iv'e actually seen looking in that direction from that angle. I did not know that there was a gate/turnstile there, although it makes sense that they would want to block off the administration areas. I always just assumed they stopped them and made them turn around in the lobby ;)

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Hi All,

Now I do have my glasses on - those are two Jimmy Lynch Death Dodgers card behind the lead car being pulled by the guy with the strong teeth.

MB

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I bet the Bridge of Tomorrow turnstile people had dual roles - keep Fair visitors from wandering to the offices thinking they were part of the show, and to keep people from getting into the Fair for free through the admin building. We had that at Disneyland, where on building was open to the outside world. If you got in for any business reason you could then pop into the Park for free. Notice they had at least two people working that role - no way that be could be paid for today in a similar situation. And what neat uniforms!

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I know it's been said, but it bears repeating--Great Photos! Thanks so much for sharing these unusual views. Whalen...What a character! The Times Square info booth shot is indeed very interesting (especially with the guys painting it). I think the only other shot I've seen of that is from one of those "mini photos" sets in the little cardboard mailer. It was a general New York City set, but the fact that the Times Square photo had the T&P in the middle of it helped me place the set as being from the time of the fair.

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Something odd about that T&P Times Square photo.

Why bother constructing a specific, curved, one-site scaffold? How many times could the Perisphere require painting or other servicing, even in grimy TS ? And why use brushes? I would have gone on strike until management supplied a roller.

Well, turns out the paint roller was not to be invented until 1940. Learn something every day around PTU!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint_roller

Still, even with that ladder to the left, that guy wasn't giving the Trylon a fresh coat all at once. Like the Washington Monument, there would be a change in shade part way up.

Wonder if this was a semi publicity stunt to add dynamic action to the debut of an otherwise static display. The two "wet paint" signs hang ready for an off-camera Laurel and Hardy, the Stooges, or some other pre-war physical comedians to apply their trademark shticks.

That vehicle to the Perisphere's lower right sure looks interesting.

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Hi All,

Wouldn't painting a spherical object with a roller make it more difficult? Anyway, to really mix it up, I have a candid of that T&P booth in Times Square, and it is rotated into an entirely different position! :huh:

Best wishes,

MB

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And why use brushes? I would have gone on strike until management supplied a roller.

You do not sound like a true union painter with that statement. I'll bet there was great resistance to use of rollers when they came out.

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Man, I just had to identify the make of that car with the WF-4 plate - it fairly shouts "I am the most important person here! Clear the way, peasants!"

It's a 1937 Lincoln V12 convertible sedan

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kathandtheo/3097850068/

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Man, I just had to identify the make of that car with the WF-4 plate - it fairly shouts "I am the most important person here! Clear the way, peasants!"

It's a 1937 Lincoln V12 convertible sedan

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kathandtheo/3097850068/

You know, I was also thinking that it might have been a Lincoln and I was going to look into it and correct my post if it were needed - thanks for the leg up.

Mr. 'L'

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"...Why bother constructing a specific, curved, one-site scaffold?..."

Hi,

That is not a scaffold - it was always there until it was taken down as far as I know. It was some thing for signage to be attached to (and perhaps served some other purpose) and in my candid it is on the other side of the Perisphere - or the Perisphere was rotated. I don't think it went all the way round. There are only a few images on Google images that show this T&P in Times Square. Anyone else have photographs of this thing?

Best always,

MB

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Well, as long as I have your attention, here's a few more gems from my scrapbook.

But first, a couple of words;

My association with the fair is more than one fold!; when I was a year old in 1939 (I guess I have now given away my age) my parents took me to the fair just so some day (now) I could say I was there! of course, I remember absolutely nothing about it.

My father in law who owned Craftsman Welders in Brooklyn fabricated the entire Billy Rose Aquacade - I have family photos of the construction elsewhere in this forum but place one here anyway for those of you who may not have seen them.

And lastly, another part of my family owned Green Bus Lines of Jamaica, New York which was an active feeder to the exposition - see special Mack in World's Fair livery also below.

A couple of explanations; In photo number 1, which depicts the headquarters of the World's Fair Police Department, the building just outside the park was originally Flushing District Courthouse.

The 1934 Arens Fox fire pumper in photo number 6 was one of several borrowed from the City of New York for the Fair (BTW: the bright chromium ball just ahead of the engine was not for decoration - it somehow maintained water pressure).

Photo number 7 depicts a special parking facility just for waiting buses and mostly from New Jersey Public Service.

Photo number 8 was one of many visitor parking lots - almost looks as though they posed the cars for the picture!

Photo number 9 is one of Jimmie Lynch's Death Dodgers up close!

Photo number 10 is my father in laws work at the Aquacade.

And, photo number 11 is Green Bus Lines number 824 dressed or the Fair (a more complete story on 824 and her siblings can be found elsewhere in this forum.

Enjoy.

Mr. 'L'

WORLDSFAIR21PDHQ.jpg

WORLDSFAIR22.jpg

WORLDSFAIR24.jpg

WORLDSFAIR26.jpg

WORLDSFAIR27.jpg

WORLDSFAIR29.jpg

WORLDSFAIR31.jpg

WORLDSFAIR32.jpg

WORLDSFAIR35.jpg

Aquacade.jpg

GBL824WORLDSFAIR-5.jpg

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Thank you "Mr. L" for those very interesting photos!! And I can now clearly see the "Employees Only" sign on Bills photo, as well as some other interesting details that I missed on the original.

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Good observation on the pre-OSHA headwear. They may dodge death, but show less agility regarding grievous head trauma.

Please pardon this tangent, but below is the only mention I've ever seen of what we kids called the "Upside-down Building" attached to the Queensborough Bridge, kinda-recently razed.

"During February, 1941, five HT model pumpers, three from the 1938... and two from the 1939... were retrofitted with the unique feature of a hinged rear step. The rationale for this was to enable these pumpers to be placed in a vehicle elevator which operated from the center of the Queensborough Bridge down to Welfare (now Roosevelt) Island, located in the center of the East River. Prior to the construction of the Welfare Island Bridge, this elevator was the only practical method for responding units to reach Welfare Island. When compared to other contemporary pumpers, such as the 1937 Mack pumpers which were 26 feet 4 inches long, the HT models were almost a foot longer, having an overall length of 27 feet 1 inch (the World's Fair HT models were an inch longer). With the step in the folded position, additional clearance of slightly over one foot was provided." From: http://nyfd.com/calderoneA/foxes2.html

I rode that elevator! The landing attached to the bridge was called the first floor, the ground floor 8 or so stories below, was given the appropriate number, hence the upside-down name. While this moniker was gospel among our gang, it might well have been an urban legend. I have no independent evidence corroborating this.

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I worked in a government facility that was mostly underground and the elevators were numbered that way as well, 1 being the ground floor, 2 being lower, etc.

I wonder if that bridge elevator is still there.

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I worked in a government facility that was mostly underground and the elevators were numbered that way as well, 1 being the ground floor, 2 being lower, etc.

I wonder if that bridge elevator is still there.

This may answer your question;

"Two trolley lines were provided on the outer lanes of the lower level. The trolley service, operated by the Queensborough Bridge Railway, went back and forth between stations at each end of the bridge. The trolleys also stopped at two other stops on the bridge: one above Vernon Boulevard in Long Island City, the other above Roosevelt Island. From these stations, trolley riders descended a small staircase to a catwalk underneath the roadway, where they entered an "upside down building" (the entrance was on the roof) in which they took elevators to street level. There was also a vehicular elevator to transport cars to and from Roosevelt Island. Trolley service ended with the completion of the Roosevelt Island Bridge in 1955. The old elevator buildings were demolished in 1970".

Funny that here in Los Angeles we have houses perched on the sides of steep hills (yes, they're the one you see burning every so often)and they are built upside down with the garage and entry at the top and the living floors below.

Getting back to the bridge, I remember the trolley stop at the center on the north side and used to see the ambulances going into and coming out of the elevator - it was a very interesting construction and probably the only one of its kind.

BTW; my father in law was responsible for the fabrication of the steelwork for the second upper roadway which was built sometime after WWII.

Before that construction, traffic direction was changed on the one two lane roadway which prohibited car from coming out of the city in the A.M. or going into same in the evening.

Here's a little known fact about another East River crossing; Did you know that traffic was so light at night in 1940 when the Queens Midtown Tunnel was opened that the toll collectors went home at 11 P.M. and didn't return until 7 A.M. allowing free passage through the night.

However, the Triboro officers did continue regular cat walk patrols.

Mr. 'L'

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Good observation on the pre-OSHA headwear. They may dodge death, but show less agility regarding grievous head trauma.

Please pardon this tangent, but below is the only mention I've ever seen of what we kids called the "Upside-down Building" attached to the Queensborough Bridge, kinda-recently razed.

"During February, 1941, five HT model pumpers, three from the 1938... and two from the 1939... were retrofitted with the unique feature of a hinged rear step. The rationale for this was to enable these pumpers to be placed in a vehicle elevator which operated from the center of the Queensborough Bridge down to Welfare (now Roosevelt) Island, located in the center of the East River. Prior to the construction of the Welfare Island Bridge, this elevator was the only practical method for responding units to reach Welfare Island. When compared to other contemporary pumpers, such as the 1937 Mack pumpers which were 26 feet 4 inches long, the HT models were almost a foot longer, having an overall length of 27 feet 1 inch (the World's Fair HT models were an inch longer). With the step in the folded position, additional clearance of slightly over one foot was provided." From: http://nyfd.com/calderoneA/foxes2.html

I rode that elevator! The landing attached to the bridge was called the first floor, the ground floor 8 or so stories below, was given the appropriate number, hence the upside-down name. While this moniker was gospel among our gang, it might well have been an urban legend. I have no independent evidence corroborating this.

Here's a shot of Engine # 305 out of Queens Boulevard Forest Hills at the scene of an active house fire in Kew Gardens circa 1950.

That is one beautiful machine!

Mr. 'L'

ARENSFOX305-1.jpg

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