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NYC 2012 Olympic Plans

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Some of the sites that are considered for the 2012 Olympics NYC. The Web Site for pictures and information for NYC 2012 <a href="http://www.nyc2012.com/" target="_blank">http://www.nyc2012.com/</a>

They have some of the events for the olympics 2012 at the 64/65 Worlds Fairs site

National Tennis Center

Sports: Tennis

Olympic tennis will take place at the National Tennis Center, where the world's best players gather annually for the U.S. Open. Considered the nation's premier tennis facility, the National Tennis Center boasts three competition stadiums, 33 outdoor competition courts, and nine indoor courts. The venue's centerpiece, Arthur Ashe Stadium, named for the first African-American man to win a Grand Slam event, offers seating for 23,000. State-of-the-art support facilities are available for athletes, spectators, and the media. Olympic tennis will take place just before the U.S. Open, ensuring maximum participation and exposure for the sport.

Flushing Meadows Whitewater Center

Sports: Slalom Canoeing

The Fountain of the Planets, built for the 1964 World's Fair, will be transformed into New York's first center for whitewater canoeing. Modeled on the highly acclaimed venue created for the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, a 400-meter course in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will provide challenging conditions for Olympic athletes within the city limits, where the sport will be readily accessible to a broad spectator base. A C-shaped artificial waterway will wind its way down from the top of a dramatic berm, which will provide a 20-foot drop from start to finish. A system of moveable obstacles will allow the course to be fine-tuned for Olympic competition.

Legacy

Creating a permanent world-class facility in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will establish New York City as a national center for whitewater canoeing training and competition. Varying the speed of the water will make the course accessible to recreational users, too. Three boathouses will house a kayaking center that rents boats and provides instruction. In place of today's worn terrain, four new soccer fields will be constructed to meet the intense needs of the vibrant international community in Queens, with the berm providing seating for the many fans who come to this area.

Flushing Meadows Regatta Center

Sports: Flatwater Canoeing

Rowing

Site of the 1939 and 1964 World's Fairs, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will host rowing and flatwater canoeing in a new world-class regatta center. Easily reachable from Midtown Manhattan and the Olympic Village, the Flushing Meadows Regatta Center will be the only world-class rowing and canoeing venue in a major northeastern city. The park's two manmade lakes, Meadow Lake and Willow Lake, will be joined to form a 2,000-meter course, with six new boathouses erected near the former site of the Flushing Aquacade. To ensure uninterrupted transportation for the surrounding neighborhood, a new bridge will be built for Jewel Avenue, which crosses the park between the lakes; afterwards, the strip of land that divides the lakes will be removed. The graceful new bridge structure will provide an elegant backdrop to the finish line. In addition to ticketed seating, thousands of spectators will be able to line the shores and watch the competition for free.

Legacy

By creating a world-class regatta center in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, New York City, already home to an enormous concentration of rowers, will establish itself as a national rowing and canoeing center, able to host collegiate, amateur, and national championship events. The facility will sponsor programs to enable school children to experience these sports for the first time with conditions for recreational boating vastly improved. Renovation of the park will include three new baseball diamonds, two new softball fields, and six new soccer fields. The park's southern section will be upgraded with a comprehensive plan for protecting habitats for birds, fish, and other wildlife, and will be opened to joggers and picnickers.

Improving Meadow and Willow Lakes

Improvements to Meadow and Willow Lakes will make the park more inviting not just to boaters and other recreational users, but to fish and wildlife as well. While the lakes' water quality today is poor, dredging will remove the heavy metal sediment that has accumulated for decades. In addition, wetland areas at each of the storm water outfalls will filter runoff from the adjacent highways. These measures, along with a comprehensive basin-wide watershed management plan to reduce pollutant inputs, will ensure excellent water quality. The new wetlands, moreover, will help ensure a suitable habitat for birds, fish and other wildlife. A raised boardwalk at the park's southern end will be an ideal location for viewing competitions and for viewing wildlife. All in all, public recreation will be carefully balanced with the needs of the environment.

Flushing Meadows Regatta Center

Sports: Flatwater Canoeing

Rowing

Site of the 1939 and 1964 World's Fairs, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will host rowing and flatwater canoeing in a new world-class regatta center. Easily reachable from Midtown Manhattan and the Olympic Village, the Flushing Meadows Regatta Center will be the only world-class rowing and canoeing venue in a major northeastern city. The park's two manmade lakes, Meadow Lake and Willow Lake, will be joined to form a 2,000-meter course, with six new boathouses erected near the former site of the Flushing Aquacade. To ensure uninterrupted transportation for the surrounding neighborhood, a new bridge will be built for Jewel Avenue, which crosses the park between the lakes; afterwards, the strip of land that divides the lakes will be removed. The graceful new bridge structure will provide an elegant backdrop to the finish line. In addition to ticketed seating, thousands of spectators will be able to line the shores and watch the competition for free.

Legacy

By creating a world-class regatta center in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, New York City, already home to an enormous concentration of rowers, will establish itself as a national rowing and canoeing center, able to host collegiate, amateur, and national championship events. The facility will sponsor programs to enable school children to experience these sports for the first time with conditions for recreational boating vastly improved. Renovation of the park will include three new baseball diamonds, two new softball fields, and six new soccer fields. The park's southern section will be upgraded with a comprehensive plan for protecting habitats for birds, fish, and other wildlife, and will be opened to joggers and picnickers.

Improving Meadow and Willow Lakes

Improvements to Meadow and Willow Lakes will make the park more inviting not just to boaters and other recreational users, but to fish and wildlife as well. While the lakes' water quality today is poor, dredging will remove the heavy metal sediment that has accumulated for decades. In addition, wetland areas at each of the storm water outfalls will filter runoff from the adjacent highways. These measures, along with a comprehensive basin-wide watershed management plan to reduce pollutant inputs, will ensure excellent water quality. The new wetlands, moreover, will help ensure a suitable habitat for birds, fish and other wildlife. A raised boardwalk at the park's southern end will be an ideal location for viewing competitions and for viewing wildlife. All in all, public recreation will be carefully balanced with the needs of the environment.

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An odd industrial look intro to that Olympic site. I do not like at all what they plan to do to the Pool of Industry (which will cease to exist) And putting baseball at Yankee Stadium is a bit strange. The Stadium appears altered in the morphing photo. I understand it is the most revered sports venue in our country but it is off site somewhat.

I don't know if anyone commutes to work in this forum but the way things are spread out will simply wreck havoc on the daily driving grind. Also, it does not give a focal point to the games.

[This message has been edited by Mary Ellen (edited 07-27-2002).]

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Maryellen great insight, they will ruin what was left of the old fair. They can place the one event that will ruin the fountains some where else in the park. Is there any way we could have input into this?

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With all due respect:

Baseball at Yankee Stadium would be strange? Excuse me???

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Gene - you must be a bomber fan! Although I am admittedly a Mets Fan I still do not want them to alter Yankee Stadium. The last renovations to Shea were ghastley and it would be a shame to update the Yankee Stadium look. A lot of the original look was lost during the last YS renovation. (Shea Stadium was the Yankees home during that period)

I always feel the further you get away from the original look the less value (from a preservation standpoint) is placed on the venue.

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Yes, I'm a Yankee fan which being that I'm from the Bronx should not be too surprising.

I disagree that the last renovation changed much of the look of the original stadium- it changed almost all of that look. The only original parts left are the concourses behind the lower and middle stands, the some of the steelwork in the upper deck and about 2/3rds of the exterior walls. It is essentially a '70s ballpark which is already slated for replacement by a facility across the street from the current stadium. In Yankee Stadium's case I don't think the Olympics has much to do with its future. The existing structure would be fine for an Olympics tournament as would a replacement. I think Shea was not chosen to give the Bronx more participation. Also George Steinbrenner was/is on the USOC and is supportive of their efforts while the Mets in the past have not been so cooperative about using Shea for other purposes.

[This message has been edited by Gene (edited 07-29-2002).]

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Ahh, I forgot the USOC Steinbrenner connection. I wonder about new stadiums. NYC will definately not support public $$ for them. There is certainly no Robert Moses around to toss a stadium into the Olympics mix like he tossed Shea into the WF mix.

According to data quoted on WFAN our local sports/talk radio, the cities that have used public $$ for private stadiums have lost out big time. The Yankees can afford to go elsewhere & I believe they ultimately will. I know for a fact that The Boss has shopped for NJ sites. The Meadowlands is about to have some big vacancies.

My Boss had a novel idea for keeping the Yankees in the Bronx. To condem or exercise emenient domanin over the franchise and make a City agency the owner "for the good of NY". I don't know if that is legal. Real Estate can be condemed but I am not sure a business can be. Interesting anyway.

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There has been so much discussion as regards NYC possibly hosting an Olympic summer games, but I am unsure as to the dates when the USOC will make the final selection and when the IOC will make its selection from the various international finalists. Does anybody know those dates? My guess is that, in the final analysis, Toronto remains the front runner by far.

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Decision day for the USOC is November 3rd.

Yankees are going nowhere except across the street, if that. George has been too concerned about being Big Man in Town and will not turn City over to Mets. In New Jersey, he's just another owner. Manhattan has been rejected by City for baseball-too many weekday games at rush hour. New Jersey has no competitive options and there have been repeated defeats of referendum to build a baseball stadium. Development plans for the Meadowlands in the event of defections are to non-sport uses.

Eminent domain has been suggested before for sports teams but never attempted.

Main Olympic Stadium would be constructed over West Side rail yards south of Javits Center. This may happen regardless of Olympic bid as future home of New York Jets and extension to Convention Center. NFL, Jets, City, and State would contribute. Bloomberg has kept this on the board as a catalyst for creating real estate development bonanza in the West 30s.

FMCP venues would probably not break ground unless bid acccepted by IOC.

[This message has been edited by Gene (edited 07-30-2002).]

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Ladies and Gentlemen, i have recently caught this on the radio 1010 wins. The only thing that the Mets and Yankees will recieve is money to renovate each stadium. The mayor stated that the cost would be a bit much for the city and taxpayer to build two new stadiums. The money will be used to build the olympic stadium which inturn will be use to bring back the NY Jets, if the olympics do come to NY. Yes I'm a yankee fan, i would like to see them stay put, there is nothing wrong the stadium they have now. There is too much history in the bronx to leave.

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This is and update on the park from the olympic web site, check this out!!!!

NYC2012 Releases Plan To Clean Environmental Degradation Of Lakes In Flushing Meadows-Corona Park

New Study Presents Detailed Measures to Clean-Up Pollutants

June 13, 2002

NYC2012 today released a report that details the decades-long environmental degradation of the twin lakes in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, which has left them choked by pollutants and algae that have a long term destructive impact on plant and aquatic life.

The report, "Ecological Engineering and Restoration Study, Flushing Meadows Lakes and Watershed," was produced by the Gaia Institute, New York's pre-eminent environmental research, design and engineering firm. It recounts how the Park's Meadow and Willow Lakes were man-made by legendary New York master planner Robert Moses for use as catch-basins for highway runoff containing heavy metals, petroleum and other pollutants, and as a decorative element for the 1939 World's Fair.

"As a result, the topography and contours are the byproduct of a bulldozer, not the forces of nature," according to Dr. Julie A. Mankiewicz and Dr. Paul S. Mankiewicz, authors of the report. "The smooth curves and even depths of the lakes do not provide the varied habitats needed for biodiversity." The report notes that today - despite clean-up attempts over the years by public officials and community organizations - the lakes suffer from "pollution that is, ironically, a result of their very creation."

The study was prepared for NYC2012, which asked the Gaia Institute to review and make recommendations for its proposal to transform the lakes into a 2,000 meter regatta center that would be the site of Olympic rowing and flatwater canoeing competitions. The new facility will provide trails and paths that meander around the restored lake edges to enhance recreational use of the park.

According to the Gaia Institute report, thousands of years before man's intervention, Flushing Meadows was a marsh that was naturally drained through the action of the tides. The report found that, because Flushing Creek was dammed by Moses in the '30s to create the lakes, tidal action has been effectively eliminated - blocking the natural drainage. As a result, phosphorus from the former marsh bed has been released unchecked, causing the lakes to be super-saturated with algae, depleting the oxygen in the water and killing off natural habitats and fish in large numbers during the summer.

The report identified the presence of only about 37 species of plant life around Willow Lake, "an area which could support an estimated 300 to 400 species," and "only six species of fish [in the two lakes]…whereas water bodies of this size should be capable of sustaining twice this number." In fact, the report found that similar lakes in and around the city, with natural drainage systems, are capable of supporting the greater level of plant and fish life that should be found in the lakes in Flushing Meadows.

Dr. Paul S. Mankiewicz said, "No plan has emerged - prior to the NYC2012 proposal - for the comprehensive ecological restoration and enhancement necessary to make the lakes truly healthy for human and non-human use. With the proper techniques, the NYC2012 proposal could provide the integration of infrastructure and natural systems essential for the improvement of the lake environment and the protection of human and ecological health."

The Institute's report includes recommendations for the use of natural ecological systems to achieve clean water and a healthy landscape for the Flushing Meadows lakes. According to the report, dredging the lake bottom is the most critical corrective measure. Long advocated by the New York City Parks Department and environmentalists, dredging as proposed by NYC2012 to achieve the depths needed for Olympic rowing would remove sediments that contribute to poor water quality.

Additional recommendations include:

"daylighting" of stormwater by removing pipes which now discharge highway runoff into the lakes with no natural filtration

reintroducing native wetland plant species to create a balanced ecosystem

creating terraced wetlands to increase natural filtration

expanding wetland acreage to match runoff inputs, with a six-times increase in wetlands included in the NYC2012 plan

adding a fresh layer of topsoil to improve the water infiltration rate

ongoing public access and education, including a nature sanctuary on an elevated boardwalk

"This is a remarkable report that not only documents the unfortunate conditions of these two lakes, which prevent their full enjoyment by the residents of Queens and our city, but also provides a detailed and comprehensive blueprint for their transformation," said Jay L. Kriegel, Executive Director of NYC2012. "We will return the lakes to nature through a natural cleansing process, using soil and water rather than chemicals or technology to improve the lakes and their surroundings. NYC2012 enthusiastically endorses these recommendations and will incorporate them into our existing plan. We are committed to creating an Olympic legacy in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park that will include a beautiful, restored, natural environment and recreational facilities that will be accessible to all. We are grateful to Julie and Paul Mankiewicz, and the Gaia Institute, for their invaluable guidance in how we can make this dream a reality."

When incorporated into the NYC2012 plan, the Institute's recommendations for upgrading the environment will increase the acreage of productive wetlands by 500%, improve water quality, and dramatically expand the natural wildlife habitats of the area. The elevated, curving, boardwalk will allow for bird watching and enjoyment of the Park's natural habitats.

With a total investment in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park of more than $230 million to transform the lakes, the NYC2102 plan would add jogging and bicycle trails around the combined area of the two lakes, and create three new baseball fields, two new softball fields, two new soccer fields and four new practice fields.

"This report will now give all of those who care about the lakes a solid, scientific, factual basis on which to analyze future plans," Kriegel continued. "NYC2012 will continue our ongoing dialogue with these key constituencies, which include members of the community who live around the Park, those who use the lakes or athletic fields, or who simply enjoy the Park's surroundings, Queens elected officials, the environmental community, and government authorities - both the New York City Parks Department and environmental agencies - who are ultimately response for the lakes."

NYC2012's plan for an Olympic Games in 2012 includes an investment of more than $1.2 billion from private Olympic funding sources (e.g., ticket sales, television rights, sponsorships, etc.) in new or enhanced parks and recreational facilities. The largest project is the upgrading and joining of Meadow and Willow Lakes. Overall, plans include the environmental remediation of nearly 500 acres of land, including 80 acres on the waterfront. Of the parklands to be created and enhanced, more than two-thirds would replace brownfields or other areas that represent significant liabilities. Two-thirds of the Olympic venues in the NYC2012 bid already exist in some form, such as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

NYC2012's Environmental Committee, comprised of a cross-section of leaders in New York's environmental community, has overseen the creation of an Environmental Action Plan for the Olympic Games, which has been submitted to the United States Olympic Committee. Cornerstones of the plan include sustainable development, mass transit, resource conservation, and environmental technologies. A preliminary report by the Gaia Institute has been reviewed by the committee, which will now be charged with overseeing the implementation of its final recommendations.

The Gaia Institute, based in the Bronx, has been widely relied on by public authorities and private entities for environmental research, engineering and restoration, and public education. Its mission is the exploration of how human activities and waste products can be treated to increase ecological productivity, bio-diversity, environmental quality and economic well being. The Institute is affiliated with Queens College, both through Dr. Julie Mankiewicz, who is a faculty member in the School of Environmental Sciences, and its ongoing relationship with the Globe Project based at the College. In addition to its evaluation of the NYC2012 proposal, the Institute's other major New York projects have included: Oakland Ravine Restoration; the New York City Watershed Initiative - incorporating natural filtration methods for water purification; the Creating Native Wetlands in City Island, East New York and Co-op City; the Pelham Bay and Orange County Landfills; and the Bronx River Restoration project.

NYC2012 is the committee leading New York's bid to become the U.S. Candidate City for the 2012 Olympic Games. The United States Olympic Committee will choose one city to represent the United States on November 3, 2002.

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Jim,

The IOC picks a host city seven years before the games are to be held. This is the time for venues to be built and transportation/infrastructure to be updated. Look for the final announcement in the summer of 2005....Bill

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No Stadium? No Problem / USOC committee likes NY's international style

Newsday

August 3, 2001

By John Jeansonne ...New York City is "the world's second home," where any official, athlete or spectator from anywhere on earth can find compatriots.

New York's chances of staging the 2012 Olympics hardly were diminished yesterday when a U.S. Olympic Committee site evaluation team acknowledged that a stadium plan need not be finalized before the vote to name a U.S. candidate city in November, 2002.

Furthermore, the USOC team confirmed an "international strategy" in sizing up its eight bid cities - an approach that local bid chief Dan Doctoroff believes will work strongly in New York's favor. A central theme of NYC2012, the private Olympic campaign group, is that New York City is "the world's second home," where any official, athlete or spectator from anywhere on earth can find compatriots.

Charles Moore, chairman of the 10-person USOC task force that is in the midst of visiting all eight U.S. bid cities, noted that strength. "There is no point is picking a bid city if that city can't win the Olympic Games," Moore said. "There has to be an international strategy, an international appeal to the city we pick. This is more than a beauty contest, I assure you."

Besides New York, others being evaluated are Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Cincinnati, Tampa and Washington/ Baltimore. After Moore's group ranks the contenders, a USOC board of directors vote will name its city to face international competition - from cities yet unnamed - in a 2005 International Olympic Committee vote that will award the 2012 Games.

Exactly where New York stands now, in relation to the other American bidders, is something the USOC scouts can't possible know - since their evaluation tour hasn't yet been to Tampa, Los Angeles or San Francisco - and wouldn't reveal if they did. Moore said that his group's job is "to be supportive of all eight cities; we'll do everything we can to help those bid cities."

But Moore did make it clear that New York's hopes were not hanging solely on the quick realization of a proposed 86,000-seat West Side stadium that would be part of an "expanded" Jacob Javits Convention Center and new home to the Jets. "We judge the total vision," Moore said. "The vision is sound and the pieces are reasonable. And they have time."

USOC task force member Greg Harney reminded that "lots of cities have won the Games without having a stadium in place. [NYC2012 officials] have showed us a lot of options [including the use of Shea Stadium] and that's really a plus, when a city is able to show alternatives."

Moore agreed that NYC2012 has "challenges, to the degree that facilities have not been built. There is mega-construction to be done over a relatively short time. But even if you waited [until the final 2005 IOC vote), you still have seven years.

"We understand it's not all going to be buttoned down," Moore said. "That's where the partnership [of bid organizers and city leaders] comes in."

Harney said of NYC2012, "We could tell the homework had been done here."

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Earlier this year there was an elimination round which reportedly had reduced the list of U.S. Candidates to S.F., Houston, Washington/Baltimore as well as New York.

Interesting to see that Shea Stadium is being viewed as a back-up option to the West Side proposal which would raise the stakes for FMCP. In 1960/61 when Shea was designed the original plan envisioned it being expanded to 80,000 seats and domed, if the Mets and Jets proved to be successful draws. They did but when the City proposed proceeding with the expansion the Mets ,exercising their lessee rights, blocked the plan. In 1980 when New York was putting together a hurry-up bid for the '84 games whose original host city had pulled out late in the process, the Mets again blocked a similar proposal, that time an expansion without the dome.

[This message has been edited by Gene (edited 08-08-2002).]

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Interesting environmental report on the lakes.We will see how it all plays out in the NYS legislature.Here's a quote from an article at the Kew Gardens Hills Civic Association website,which has a large collection of articles about this issue at: <a href="http://www.nvbb.net/~qvhca/olympics_2012.htm" target="_blank">http://www.nvbb.net/~qvhca/olympics_2012.htm</a>

"Merging, dredging and reconfiguring Willow and Meadow Lakes for flat water and canoeing events would permanently destroy Willow Lake, a New York State Class One protected wetland. Willow is a spring fed fresh water lake surrounded by marshes and meadows that are home to small mammals, birds and wild flowers. Any effort to eliminate or substantially alter the wetlands area would require a daunting and possibly years long

public review by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In our opinion, the New York State Legislature would have final approval over any changes in the wetland area."

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I hope these people have looked ahead on what the environmental effects will have on the lakes. I do not have to assume, they just do what they want to do, they will not take in concideration what the long term effects will be, only the short term. People like you and me will end up paying for their mess, and clean up after them.

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Yes they have given a lot of thought to the environmental impact on those manmade lakes. I think it would be a big improvement. The lakes were my playground from 1955 to 1965 and I give the plan a big thumbs up!

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Questions to ponder:

How can NYC suddenly come up with the money to take care of the lakes now after all of this time? Where is this Olympic funding going to come from? Does anyone really expect the lakes to be left in good shape when the Olympics are over and people "discover" it cost a lot more than they expected and there just isn't any money to complete the job?

Final question:

Why would anyone believe the plan will work NOW when it sure didn't work as expected for the Fair?

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No problem, Bill, Bloomberg's got that much change lost underneath his couch cushions.

What's a billion or two between friends?

[This message has been edited by Gene (edited 09-08-2002).]

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