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Doug Seed

Two Luminaires Liberated

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Doug, i want to thank you for that magical day at the park, and for giving me a piece of history. What a blast we had along with Gary, and my friend Ron. Here are some pictures of that day, when for a couple of hours we were kids again.............Johnny

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Here are some pictures of the lamp before i started cleaning her up. Looks like the colors held up fairly good for 44 years. I took off the screen so it can be seen how the pole was attached to the light with set screws. You can see how the speaker was held in place with four screws. The speaker looks post fair, but the housing is original. I put the camera far down the speaker cone and found a couple of buss bars. Looks like there were a lot of wires going everywhere inside the light.Then we have Westinghouse by Frink, do we have any information on Frink, More stuff to ponder................Johnny

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I fully expect at some future SiP to see a lovingly restored luminaire being ceremoniously borne to its original site, identified through serial number, color and cube combination, then planted in the ground and struggled upright in a reenactment of the Marines raising the flag on Mount Suribachi. Don't disappoint.

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You're a very bright guy, Wayne! :rolleyes:

Using 14 lamps per luminaire has to be throwing your calculations off, though.

I don't think that every cube had a lamp, and most luminaires had fewer than 14 cubes.

Yadda's ultimate luminaire document will tell you how many lamps per configuration.

According to the documents, 14 was the maximum number of lighted cubes, so I calculated for that. For any particular number N, you can just multiply my result by N/14. The calculations are simplified by considering all the bottom panels as one point source. Due to the height and spacing of luminaires, this is probably off by no more than single digit percentages. Also, this is a reasonable method for calculating outdoor lighting with no reflective walls nearby. Plus, there is much more uncertainty as to how much of the light was emitted downward by those flat lamps. Even with the simplifications, the spreadsheet is over 4 MB.

[edit - the light levels are calculated at ground level - will be somewhat different if calculated at waist level and 0 or 45 degrees for reading maps or face level and 90 degrees for looking at people.]

Another old link I found here said that the bumps on the bottom surface provided higher efficacy, but also said that more efficient phosphors (with poorer color characteristics) were used on the top.

http://www.lamptech.co.uk/Spec%20Sheets/GE%20Panel%20F.htm

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Thank you, Johnny!!

I.P. Frink was a lighting fixture and component manufacturer in NY. That is new info!

Also obvious from your photos is that the top/bottom square "hoops" were castings! Didn't know that either.

Notice the cast bosses on the sides. Most likely these were used to center the inserts.

Fabulous!

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The 16 different colors that the plexiglass panels came in are:

1 - Violet

2 - Purple

3 - Light Blue

4 - Blue

5 - Aqua

6 - Turquoise

7 - Green

8 - Charteuse

9 - Olive Green

10 - Yellow

11 - Yellow/Orange

12 - Coral

13 & 14 Red

15 - Ivory

16 - White

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Yep, max 14 lighted cubes, and max 16 total cubes.

Did we ever figure out the reason for cubes with:

1) Lamp and Colorless/Pattern

2) No Lamp and Colorless/Pattern

3) No Lamp and Color Panels

And what was the TH-125/P4 Colorless/Pattern panel anyway?

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Johnny,

Great pix! I can imagine your smile wrapping around your head a couple of times while you were exploring the fixture...

Mitch

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"And what was the TH-125/P4 Colorless/Pattern panel anyway?"

I think the colorless panels were just the ones facing down to let the light out. Gary said that they were transparent, but with a diamond pattern - as a diffuser, I imagine.

I'm pretty sure that all of the cube sides were translucent and colored.

Looking at Craig's list of colors, and then looking at the last-standing Canobie lamp, I would guess Coral, Blue and either Ivory or White (probably White). I thought it was a faded orange, but seeing Coral in the list, I vote Coral.

It would be helpful if Yadda could post his master PDF to this thread so everybody could jump to it for reference as we wade through luminaireland again.

And Gary... could you please post a link to your Flickr shots of the Orange County Fairgrounds lamps?

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Was it Yadda or Randy that did the full color isometrics addition to the pdfs of all the configs?

Whichever, they deserve a gold medal!

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Hi Mike,

Kevin did the isometric drawings.

I have the the 14 official colors used on the luminaires. Some of the color names are a stretch for the actual color, like the purpilish-red RED (G) and blue-green GREEN ©.

The chart cross-references the NYWF color-code against the Plexiglas color number, the Pantone reference number, and the HTML color hexidecimal codes.

NYWF Luminaire Color Chart Cross-reference

The clear diffusers are also a standard Plexiglas item and P4 is the code for a miniature prism pattern used on one side of the panel.

Have fun, Randy.

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FYI

Here is something I found today - a Korean company that has recently announced flat panel fluorescent lamps (based on LCD TV back lights, I think) - apparently not yet incorporated into any consumer products. The 12x12 square looks like two of them back to back would make a pretty close replacement for the original GE's in terms of light output. No idea how much they would go for. There is some US contact info.

http://www.lumiette.com/page.php?id=18

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It would be helpful if Yadda could post his master PDF to this thread so everybody could jump to it for reference as we wade through luminaireland again.

Here you go Doug...

Luminaire_Configurations.pdf

Also - Mike mentioned the isometric drawings I did a while back.

These can be seen in the four PDFs below:

Luminaire Configurations - Part 1.pdf

Luminaire Configurations - Part 2.pdf

Luminaire Configurations - Part 3.pdf

Luminaire Configurations - Part 4.pdf

Finally, Randy Lambertus has kindly granted me permission to share his Luminaire dimensions drawings with all of you as well:

Luminaire Dimensions (Lambertus).pdf

Hope this helps move the conversation forward!

Kevin

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"And what was the TH-125/P4 Colorless/Pattern panel anyway?"

And Gary... could you please post a link to your Flickr shots of the Orange County Fairgrounds lamps?

Hi, the Flicke site is: http://www.flickr.com/photos/25156558@N05/sets/72157612931801031/

Also, here are some pictures of the Canobie lamp:

First is just one of the lamp in my garage, awaiting further cleaning and care:

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The second is a close up of something Canobie added in to the lamp - there is one at every point where there is a new lamp:

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And here is a comparison of two of the plastic squares - one side faced out for 45 years, the side on the other one faced in. On the edge of the one that faced out, you can see the area unbleached by the sun and elements:

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And, finally, it's not too clear, but here is a picture of a lit bottom panel, the type with the prism squares: this is a picture from one of my other lamps with the interior lit. The flash on my digital camera is broken - otherwise I would take a flash pic or it with the luminaire lights off:

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The second is a close up of something Canobie added in to the lamp - there is one at every point where there is a new lamp:

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That looks like a lamp ballast that they would have fitted with the new lamps.

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That looks like a lamp ballast that they would have fitted with the new lamps.

You are correct, sir. Looks like they used HID lamps to replace the flourescents.

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Boy, it's neat to see all of the different configurations of cubes in Gary's Orange County Fairgrounds photos! They look cool all together.

In those photos, notice all of the dirt and dead bugs that have collected inside on the bottom panels. Quite unsightly. That's why Canobie switched all of their bottom panels to "open egg-crate plastic grilles. (the kind that are sometimes used in fluorescent light fixtures in suspended ceilings)

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Thanks for sharing that Wayne.

That panel that looks something like a white waffle was really innovative. (I think it might have been either Randy Lambertus or yourself who posted some articles about the panel here on this board a few years ago that explained how it worked).

Too bad they couldn't get the manufacturing costs down enough to put it into full scale production.

If I recall right it had gas inside it like a flourescent 'tube', but no tubes were needed to energize the gas to produce light. There was a reason the gases were separated into those little squares that made it look like a 'waffle' but I don't recall what those reasons were, only that it was a really cool engineering solution.

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Thanks for sharing that Wayne.

That panel that looks something like a white waffle was really innovative. (I think it might have been either Randy Lambertus or yourself who posted some articles about the panel here on this board a few years ago that explained how it worked).

Too bad they couldn't get the manufacturing costs down enough to put it into full scale production.

If I recall right it had gas inside it like a flourescent 'tube', but no tubes were needed to energize the gas to produce light. There was a reason the gases were separated into those little squares that made it look like a 'waffle' but I don't recall what those reasons were, only that it was a really cool engineering solution.

The problem was not so much cost to manufacture, but unreliable lifetime due to problems with sealing the top and bottom together. The top and bottom had ribs that were supposed to join so that they formed a sinuous fluorescent tube internally, but apparently they often developed slow leaks that eventually caused them to fail. The waffling exposed phosphor more closely to the internal ultraviolet discharge, increasing efficiency.

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Hi new to this I just bought one of these luminaires.

Looking for a good source for the correct Al grilles.

3 of mine are damages and it seems its an odd measurement so it may have been custom.

Mine still has one of the original lamp holder/socket and ballasts.

Also if anyone has some exra cubes or parts of I would be interested in a buy.

Thanks for any help in this matter.

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