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New book of interest

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I woke up this morning to an interview of the author, Jill Jones, of this book on KGO radio in San Francisco. John Rothman was the host.

You can download the audio at

http://www.kgoam810.com/Article.asp?id=49920

Choose Sunday May 10 5:00-6:00AM

(I think they only keep the files online for a week)

- - Eiffel's Tower: And the World's Fair Where Buffalo Bill Beguiled Paris, the Artists Quarreled, and Thomas Edison Became a Count) - -

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Posted · Report post

Thank you very much for posting that.

Naturally I managed to miss their one week cutoff and did not hear the interview.

The library has the book on order and I am in the queue.

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Just got my own copy delivered today in time for an anniversary trip I'm taking with my wife-- the perfect reading material! Will post my review here when I'm finished. Thanks for the heads-up!

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Just finished reading this book-- and thoroughly enjoyed it. Great parallel storytelling about Eiffel's mindblowing struggles to build the tower, Edison's determined fight to retain control over his phonograph and its exhibition at the fair, Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley's adoration by the French people, and the challenges faced by American artists trying to get their work seen (and taken seriously) by the Parisian Art Elite. Very nicely written.

eiffels+tower.jpg

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Hiya Trey,

that is a heck of a photograph! Rich with both mood and atmosphere - love it! Thanks. :)

Best alwys my friend,

Eric

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This was one of the most accurately titled books I ever encountered. The author is true to her word and addresses all the subjects mentioned in the subtitle... to varying degrees of detail. For instance, Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley's exploits were well described and interesting as was Edison's. But his "becoming a count" was basically just that, in as many words.

It's always satisfying to be reminded our own time is not unique and that people bickered like children, no matter how monumental the backdrop, throughout history. Eiffel's attempts to complete his tower were opposed by labor strikes, liability worries over the tower collapsing onto neighboring structures and fears that lightning would be sucked out of storms, altering rain patterns in the area. Probably not a crazy idea in the 19th Century. What will future generations think of our ulcers over Global Warming?

There was sparse description of the rest of the Fair save for the notable, for me, hint at what went on in that pre-Unispheric big sphere of earth sometimes seen in photos of the Eiffel Tower's surroundings. A few paragraphs on page 261 mention how visitors saw representations of lines of human communication, exploration and expansion across the globe. I would love to learn more.

The European reaction to Sioux Indians and their participation in the Wild West Show suggested the tip of the iceberg of what must surely be a fascinating story.

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