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Bill Cotter

Some views not seen before

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Many of the pictures found from the fair are common views, but every now and then you come across something different. Happily some photographers went for more than just the usual Trylon and Perisphere shots. A few years ago I bough several rolls of negatives that had been stored rolled up for years, making it impossible to get them to lay out flat for easy scanning. I've worked with them on and off but they're real time consuming to deal with. I just found another of them I had forgotten about and have started working through the images. B&W is a real pain as you can't use the Digital ICE feature of the scanner to remove dust and scratches, but my Epson V700 does a pretty good job through a different method, so I decided to give it a try. I'll get some of these posted as I work on them.

Here's the first one:

39-greyhound-2.jpg

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Only the ones directly in the center.

All World's Fair Buses

Give You the Comfort of

Firestone

Airtex Cushions

Be Sure to Visit

the

Greyhound

Exhibit

(the rest gets hard to read)

The signs off to the sides are too soft to decipher. The negative was very grainy so that didn't help any.

Here's another view, this time of folks getting off a train at the LIRR platform, ready for their day in the World of Tomorrow.

39-lirr-platform.jpg

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Hi Bill,

I never thought anyone would want to see this kind of stuff - I have an album of a high school trip with all sorts of views inside the bus used and views of the Fair from a long ways off. I must dig it up one of these days. Even I am not so interested as I am still wading through photographs inside the Fair! ;)

Best and many thanks for posting these,

Eric

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For me the more esoteric the better. I'd rather have a shot of say a souvenir stand to study than another Aquacade view, or Unisphere, etc. That's the fun thing about collecting - something new comes along from time to time to make the hunt interesting.

Let's see how many people other than MB know where this one was taken:

39-window.jpg

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Here's one more, then it's back to some other projects for a while. Here's a view of the interior of the IBM exhibit:

39-ibm-interior.jpg

Off to the right there's a scrolling sign over a large piece of equipment that reads:

This All-Electric Writing Machine Is Being Operated

By A Beam Of Light. The Operation

(cuts off there)

I wonder if that's an early fax machine.

By the way, as an idea of what's involved in restoring these, here's a "before" version:

39-ibm-before.jpg

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Let's see how many people other than MB know where this one was taken:

39-window.jpg

I believe the young man was watching water.

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That is indeed the correct setting. I have many views from the outside but this is the first view from the inside of the waterfall that I've come across.

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Smart guys ALL! I have seen a photo of that whole room with that window - think I mentioned it here somewhere - it must have been incredible, and at night.....one can only imagine. Bill, that is a lovely photograph and restoration - congrats!

Looking forward to June 15th!

MB

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I've seen some color home movies of the windows, quite beautiful. Also the Italian pavilion had windows underneath its waterfall and the view from inside was stunning.

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These are often my favorite photographs. I love the look of the people who actually experienced the Fair. The clothing, the signs, the facial expressions--all of these combine to tell me so much about 1939. And the photograph of people exiting the train is well captioned by Bill. They are, indeed, off to spend a day at their World of Tomorrow. It is a wonderful shot.

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I always find it intersting to think how all these folks are enjoying a magical day at the fair never suspecting that the entire world will be caught up in war in a short time later

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Fantastic photos Bill - thanks for sharing!

I agree with you too, the more mundane (or offbeat) photos are usually the more interesting ones to look at...

Strange to think that the "kid" looking out the window of the Electric Utilities Pavilion is closing in on 80 now (assuming he's even still alive).

Cheers,

Kevin

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never suspecting that the entire world will be caught up in war in a short time later

I’m afraid that’s not accurate. The citizens of 1939 were all too aware of the impending war. :(

In my collection I have just about all the New York Times rotogravure sections & NYT magazines for 1938 thru 1941. War is blazed on virtually every cover & in all issues in some form or fashion. One thing that surprised me was the coverage of Kristallnacht, there was a big picture on the front page of the roto section. Beaucoup amounts of coverage of the destruction in Britain and of airplanes/air war.

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By 1940, the Fair corporation would not allow the broadcasting of war related news items over the Fair's public address system. Furthermore, Fairgoers were asked "to refrain from discussion of the European situation" at Fair restaurants according to New Yorker magazine at the time. There were painful reminders of the War everywhere, however, including the empty French and Czech pavilions, the display of captured items of war in the British pavilion, a donation box for refugees in the nearly empty Polish pavilion and so on. We knew war was coming to us. We just did not know when.

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For a fascinating glimpse of 1939 get the mp3s of WJSV’s entire broadcast day. On September 21, 1939 all 19 hours of this CBS affiliate in Washington were recorded for posterity. It’s absolutely riveting and really added tone to my perception of 1939.

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Here's a view of what that round window looked like from the other side:

39-electric-utilities.jpg

and one of people climbing up from the Long Island Rail Road platform:

39-exiting-lirr.jpg

I would love to know what that kid and the conductor were looking at. They don't seem happy about something.

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Some guy waving a copy of "To Serve Man" had came running up yelling, "It's a cookbook! It's a cookbook!"

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39-exiting-lirr.jpg

Great shots indeed! In particular the one with the father & son holding hands. :)

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Interesting shades (I think that is what they are) on the woman near the boy.

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The "To Serve Man" Twilight Zone episode was my immediate reaction, too! :lol:

What's the thing to the left that looks like an airplane fuselage?

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And what a young Brad Pitt that kid is.

Seen the Benjamin Button website? They integrate Benjamin into vintage photographs as his ages change. Quite effective & interesting. Shame they couldn't come up with better primary poster art. Still one hell of a stellar film.

www.benjaminbutton.com

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