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I feel confident in saying this is indeed rare. Found it a few weeks ago and could not resist it. Amazing what surfaces.

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It is a milk carton. I have not seen one of that design since I was a kid (I remember those funky openings on the top of the waxy container) and I cannot believe you found one from 1936. What an incredible and very fragile find. Where did you locate this item? I have to wonder how it was preserved all of these years.

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It was not bought on eBay or in Ohio. Was found in Washington state and I was told it came from an estate sale.

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Amazing. Somebody really must have treasured that item for it to have been preserved all of these years. What a great find.

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Somebody really must have treasured that item for it to have been preserved all of these years.

Actually I doubt it. Over the years I've been to thousands of estate sales, best stuff come from the pack rats where things are acquired en mass, then forgotten about. (Or as my favorite liquidators phrase it, " where long pants & closed toe shoes, it's a dig out.") Generally these folks were raised during the depression and kept everything. I suspect the milk carton was found holding something, maybe buttons or rubber bands as the top closure has a lot of wear more than a single serve milk normally would. Thing I cannot figure out is how did it get to Washington state? That's a mystery. :huh:

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Thing I cannot figure out is how did it get to Washington state? That's a mystery. :huh:

Two possibilities come to mind right away:

1) This Expo was in 1937. We're talking Grapes of Wrath time. Lots of people migrating across the country to where the grass was perceived to be greener, due to economic hard times and midwest dustbowls. The grapes were less wrathier and more suitable for fine wine out west. Apple farmers loved what they found in Washington.

2) WWII was just around the corner. It sent America's young men around the world. Lots of them were shipped out from west coast ports and came back that way. Others, Navy mostly, operated out of west coast home ports, coming in from combat patrol about once a year. Enough time to look around.

Lots of people decided that the west coast was where they wanted to settle once the war was over, because it sure looked a lot better than their hometown, back in.....wherever.

That triggered the huge boom of the late 40's and 50's on the west coast. Population soared. They even brought their sports teams with them- the Rams from Cleveland in '46 (Cleveland remember, milk cartons, Drew Carey, etc. etc....) and later the Giants and the Dodgers.

Whatever the reason for moving, people brought their "stuff" with them.

That's why in west coast flea markets and estate sales even to this day, you're a lot more likely to find things from the expos and world's fairs of the 1930s than from the '64-65 NYWF. The great migration had mostly ended by the time the 60's rolled around. Those people (the 60's) retire to Florida. Florida is the gold mine for '64-65 NYWF souvenirs.

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By 1937 the Dust Bowl was over and it never affected northern Ohio anyway. It was a disaster for Oklahoma and Arkansas in particular. The second theory might work.

I like the idea that the cartoon was actually used for something such as keeping buttons etc. That makes sense to me.

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My grand dad worked for about 10 years for Goodyear at their tire factory in Akron, Ohio, and my mom was born there in 1934.

But in 1937 he was caught up in a series of layoffs (apparently economic downtown in the tire business), so he moved back to Florida and bought some property to become a tomato & cucumber farmer, which is what he did for the rest of his working days.

So even though the dustbowl didn't impact northern Ohio, apparently the Great Depression did, with people relocating to wherever they thought they could find jobs.

I don't recall ever asking my granddad or grandma whether they went over to Chicago to see the World's Fair in '33-34 or to Cleveland for the Expo in '36-37. I do remember grandpa talking about the zeppelins at the Goodyear plant in Akron back in the 30's.

They were certainly in Akron then during those two World's Fairs / Expos. My grandma and grandpa got married there in Akron in 1933. She was originally from Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Grandpa died in 1976; Grandma in 1998.

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