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Hi there,

I was wondering if anybody has any information about the Spanish Village at Seattle's World's Fair? I've been trying to do some research on this fair to see if Spain participated in it. I know that Spain didn't have a pavilion, but were the Spaniards represented somehow in this Spanish village? Who organized the Spanish village? What happened inside the Spanish village? None of the official guidebooks or newspaper articles I've seen mention any details about it.

Thanks in advance for your help.

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I have several pictures showing flamenco dancers in front of some tourism posters, and general village shots, but no real info on it. I wonder where the official files of the fair are these days. Might be in a library that could assist.

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The University of Washington also has some extensive archives from the 1909 Alaska-Yukon Exposition, which took place on its current campus.

It was about the same size Expo, or perhaps even larger, than the 1962 Century 21 Expo (i.e. Seattle World's Fair).

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My Grand Father, Ray Fleek and 3 or 4 other restaurant owners went together and opened the restaurant called "The Spanish Village".
They chartered a plane and brought 100 people from Spain to be Chefs, Entertainers, Waiters, etc. Many were college students.  It was not profitable. One of the students - Pablo Arranz married a girl from Seattle - Missy.  My Aunt went to Spain to live with them and go to school for 10 months

My Grandfather passed in 1968 so I can't ask him directly and the original question by  scungilli1 hasn't checked in since 2008 so it may be mute but I'll add if anything else come back from family.

-Craig Fleek

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Welcome! I'm glad you found us. I later found out that the Spanish Village caused some labor problems for the fair. Local unions protested the importing of workers who were doing jobs that US citizens could have done. A judge ruled that some claims were valid, such as for busboys in the restaurant, but allowed specialists like the flamenco dancers into the country.

Here's a picture of the restaurant for you.

spanish-village.jpg

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Thanks for the picture.  My aunt has copied and sent me a couple of newspaper articles regarding the village as well as some pictures of her with her dad, my grandfather somewhere near the Village.  I will be sharing this information with my children who probably don't understand the significance of the fair but it is part of our family history that they should know.  Maybe I can get one of them to do a book report on the fair.  Who knows.  i can attach the articles if anyone is interested.

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We certainly are interested!     It's always great when there are new members to share new stories and new information that enhances our knowledge of these Fairs of the past.     Glad to have you here.

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