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I just saw a great 10 minute MGM "TravelTalks" newsreel of the 1937 Paris Exposition on Turner Classic Movies. A fairly comprehensive tour of the international pavilions (Nazi Germany conspicuously avoided) and French provincial/colonial exhibits. Also some good footage of the illuminated fountain/firework display over the Seine. All in glorious color!

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(Nazi Germany conspicuously avoided)

Thanks for sharing! I've never seen color movies of the expo only color photography.

Do you think it was a 2008 edit/omission or a 1937 edit/omission? The majority of 1937 press, both American & European, usually includes the German Pavilion.

A rare poster of the German Pavilion sold on eBay last week.

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I was just going to see if anyone else here saw that.

I was amazed at how clear the footage was, for the 1930's. I love when TCM has those great filler features inbetween the movies.

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I saw it as well. There is a second Travel Talks about the 1939 GGIE which is shown every now and then. However, that is the second time I have seen the film on the 1937 Paris Exposition. The scenes of the Soviet Pavilion were incredible and there were only distant shots of the German Pavilion. I find that decision to not give much notice to the Nazis to be particularly interesting. It is a remarkable period piece (in vivid color no less) and it is worth checking the TCM schedule to see when it might be rebroadcast--because they do this.

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I find that decision to not give much notice to the Nazis to be particularly interesting.

Though was it authentic to 1937? In the light of the horrors of WW2 much is revised for modern audiences. Even innocuous things are censored. For example there’s a childhood picture of first lady, Jacqueline Kennedy, dressed as an Indian with swastika motif. Often the photo is cropped or photo shopped even though it has nothing whatsoever to do with the Third Reich.

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National Geographic (January, 1937) provided a gushing tribute to the "New Germany" with a photographic spread on the 1936 Olympic Games. These photographs are littered with swastika images. It is one of the most criticized issues the magazine ever published. They simply viewed the Olympics as a wonderful event in a resurgent Germany. They followed it with a huge spread on Italy including positive commentaries on Fascist youth groups etc.

You are right. In 1937 many did not see the evils of the Nazis--NG magazine included. Kristalnacht was still one year away (November, 1938). However, others did see Hitler and the Nazis as evil. News was seeping out of Germany and most understood that the Nazis had suspended persecution of the Jews for the 1936 games and anyone who wished to be informed knew about the cruelty of the 1935 Nuremburg Laws. Some did not want to recognize the reality of what was happening. I suspect that James A. Fitzpatrick did.

He made travel films from 1916 until 1954.

He made two about expositions: A Day On Treasure Island (1939) and Paris On Parade (1937).

There is a third which has some exposition images: Cavalcade of San Francisco (1940).

I find no films on the Century of Progress or the NYWF of 1939.

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The FitzPatrick "Traveltalks" Technicolor shorts are available on DVD in three volumes, each volume containing three 2.5 hour discs (total of 186 shorts). The one covering the 1937 Paris Expo is titled "Paris On Parade" and is the second segment on Disc 2 of Volume 1.

About $26 per volume on Amazon. 

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