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Great find! This is one of my favorite fairs. I'm always astounded at how they were able to incorporate a major exposition in the heart of Paris without disrupting traffic flow. This was done primarily by building a series of tunnels along the Seine and pedestrian bridges over major thoroughfares to allow fairgoers to traverse the site while avoiding vehicular traffic. I think it has been mentioned in here before... one of those tunnels is where Princess Diana met her death.

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The video starts with "Minister Schacht" giving his opening address at the dedication of the German Pavilion.

He was President of the Reichsbank- kind of the German equivalent of the head of the Federal Reserve- and was involved in the financing of everything from pavilions at International Expositions, to the autobahns, to the rebuilding of the German military.

He was one of just three defendants to be acquitted of war crimes charges in the Nuremberg Trials in 1946, but only by a very narrow split vote among the judges (the Russians wanted to hang everybody). The American prosecutor, Mr. Jackson, was said to be furious that Schacht got off scot-free. Apparently the thing that saved him was that the Nazis stripped him of his post as head of the Reichsbank in 1939, just before war broke out, and he actually got sent to a concentration camp right after the failed Hitler assassination attempt in 1944, where he remained until the war ended. Only to be arrested by the Allies...... (Schacht was later convicted by a German de-nazification court for "profiteering", but his 8-year sentence was commuted to just two years. He had never actually joined the Nazi Party.) He lived until 1970, even starting a new commercial bank in the 1950's.

His is an interesting story.

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