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Main Entrance

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Court of Presidents

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Symphony Shell

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Sherwin Williams Plaza

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The Higbee Tower

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The Aquacade

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Porcelain Enamel Exhibition Hall

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Marine Plaza

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Hall of Progress

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What a beautiful looking fair this was. I really need to learn more about it. How many, if any of the original structures are still around? Am I making it up-- or have I seen photos of the Sherwin Williams bandshell still in existence?

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Nada – Nothing. Last structure to survive was an octagonal restroom but I believe it was taken down last summer. The Donald Grey Gardens partially survived until 1997 when construction on the Browns stadium began.

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Right. The "band shell" I was thinking of isn't a band shell at all-- nor is it even in Cleveland. But this great old train station in Cincinatti (now a museum) looks like it could've easily been transported from the Great Lakes Expo fairgrounds.

 

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Edited by Bill Cotter
Fixed link to picture on external site

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I recall comparing maps of the exposition grounds and Cleveland today and much of the exposition area is now a part of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I believe the original football stadium was built at the time of the exposition (is this accurate?) but that, too, has been demolished and replaced.

I also found an article which included FDR remarks when he visited the fair in 1936 and in his very brief comments he made reference to the fact that planners of an exposition do not need years in which to build a fair. He pointed out that the Cleveland planners constructed the entire exposition in only six months and he viewed that as an achievement. That is not the only reference to that incredible construction pace I have found. It also suggests that the fair structures were painfully temporary. In fact the article about the fair posted in a previous thread indicates there were only 80 days between groundbreaking and opening. It is little wonder that none of the structures remain.

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Nada – Nothing. Last structure to survive was an octagonal restroom but I believe it was taken down last summer.

I stand corrected, was in downtown Cleveland last week and the octagonal building is still there. Looking pretty good, I might add. Next time I'm downtown I will take a snap of it.

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