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Bill Cotter

Southern California earthquake

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We just had a pretty noticeable earthquake. Rated 5.6 to 5.8. Location Chino Hills, southeast of Los Angeles. Long one. All ok with me, hope the rest of PTU West Coast Division is ok. This would have been closer to Randy than me.

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We just had a pretty noticeable earthquake. Rated 5.6 to 5.8. Location Chino Hills, southeast of Los Angeles. Long one. All ok with me, hope the rest of PTU West Coast Division is ok. This would have been closer to Randy than me.

It must be terrfying to live through these. We had a fairly minor one in NYS a number of years back, and that scared the daylights out of me. I hope everyone is okay!

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To all of you West Coasters- Hope all is well. You know we love you!

Randy- give us a shout, let us know you are ok! JS

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No biggy, was on the 8th floor and was thinkin' dis is nuttin' like than bein' on the electron microscope when the BMT rolled into the Myrtle Ave. subway stop.

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No biggy, was on the 8th floor and was thinkin' dis is nuttin' like than bein' on the electron microscope when the BMT rolled into the Myrtle Ave. subway stop.

Holy Toledo! Now that must have been insane!

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Yep, everything okay. My office is on the 5th floor adjacent to the Long Beach Airport and it shook, rattled and rolled pretty good for about 30 to 40 seconds.

Nothing fell down, nothing broke, and no injuries. We looked out the window at the golf course across the street, and the golfers were just standing there like they didn't know what to do. Maybe it improved their lie for some of them. :D

The building next door (3 stories full of engineers) got evacuated because they thought they smelled gas. The Fire Department took about an hour to determine that there was ongoing work (coincidental) on the sprinkler system and the contractor was injecting something into the pipes to test it, and when the quake caused a slight leak in the sprinkler pipe, the smell of what the contractor had been injecting made people think it smelled like gas, but it wasn't really gas. So the Fire Dept gave the green light to let all those people (several hundred) back into their building.

It was almost lunch time so some of us went on to lunch (down the stairwell not the elevator of course). There was a crack in the wallboard of the stairwell between the 1st and 2nd floor, but don't know if that crack was already there or not. Pretty superficial anyway.

I swung by my house at lunchtime just to check. Nothing fell off the walls or shelves and broke at all. The kitty was asleep in his usual sleeping place as if nothing had happened.

Turned on the TV for a few minutes, and all the local channels were doing their usual call-ins for people to tell where they were when the quake hit. The usual routine. That's pretty much a standard 'we feel each others pain' psychological thing I guess. I want facts, other people want empathy.

But the early facts seem to be pretty much universal- no injuries at all, and very little damage.

So we got off easy, it would seem. Here in Long Beach it sure shook though, and for an extensive time span- it would seem much more than we felt in the Northridge earthquake in 1994.

It seems that Southern California fared well because so much infrastructure- bridges, highrises, etc.- have been retrofitted, so they can take a pretty good shake.

The lady in the cubicle next to me has her house seemingly almost exactly on the epicenter- she called her babysitter who said a lot of china and glass vases fell in the floor and broke, but no structural damage to the house and everybody is okay. So that's good.

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Everything okay here, too. Nothing quite like being in a quake at work, though. Here at CBS Studio Center in Studio City, our office rolled and shook for a solid 30-40 seconds. Definitely unnerving-- made more so by a number of crying writers assistants who are new to California and had never experienced a "seismic event." Can't say I fault them-- having grown up myself in the "Twister Belt" of northeastern Oklahoma-- I'll still take a tornado any day over a quake. At least you have time to prepare for the former-- whereas the latter always comes completely out of nowhere.

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So happy to hear everyone is ok!!! Between the fires and the earthquakes I don't know how you aren't all on prozac all the time!! Jeez, it makes me nervous just watching it on the news. :blink:

Guess Ray skeedaddled out of town just in time! Can't imagine riding a Segway during an earthquake!!

Be safe ..

/ Nancy

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Actually we've gone quite a number of years since a significant earthquake, and as Trey said, there are quite a few 'new Californians' who have arrived in the last 13 years, so today was kind of a jolt to their thinking.

For other people, after about a half hour of office chat and 'checking in with the spouse and kids' (although the cellphone companies were all jammed), it was back to the normal office routine.

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Everything okay here, too. Nothing quite like being in a quake at work, though. Here at CBS Studio Center in Studio City, our office rolled and shook for a solid 30-40 seconds. Definitely unnerving-- made more so by a number of crying writers assistants who are new to California and had never experienced a "seismic event." Can't say I fault them-- having grown up myself in the "Twister Belt" of northeastern Oklahoma-- I'll still take a tornado any day over a quake. At least you have time to prepare for the former-- whereas the latter always comes completely out of nowhere.

Amazing. Just while I was reading Trey's post before, the sky turned black and it started dropping hail. A very ominous storm cell was moving very fast over our area. Just a couple miles away, the sky was still blue and relatively clear. No funnel's came down, but Tornadoes are very common in central Florida.

10 years ago, my friend's apartment got a direct hit from an F-5. The front bedroom, which was his roomates, was completely gone, just a void looking out to the parking lot. In my friend's room, nothing was touched and the phone was still working!

Outside, my friend's car was scratched and dented from flying debris, but still in it's spot. The jeep that had been parked a few spaces down, however, was gone, and was found later smashed into a tree around the corner. Crazy!!!

Glad you guys are ok! Jason

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In my friend's room, nothing was touched and the phone was still working!

Phones (at least the classic AT&T kind) are tough.

Remember when Hurricane Andrew hit Homestead, Florida, near Miami, in 1992?

My uncle and his wife lived in Homestead and they were okay because they evacuated, but their house was leveled- LITERALLY, nothing but rubble- a pile of bashed up spraycreted concrete block.

They were working their way through the rubble trying to salvage any family heirlooms when they heard a phone ringing. My uncle followed the sound and cleared away the rubble until he found their phone that had been buried. He picked it up and answered, and it was my dad calling to say he'd heard there'd been a hurricane and was everybody okay?

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Phones (at least the classic AT&T kind) are tough.

Remember when Hurricane Andrew hit Homestead, Florida, near Miami, in 1992?

My uncle and his wife lived in Homestead and they were okay because they evacuated, but their house was leveled- LITERALLY, nothing but rubble- a pile of bashed up spraycreted concrete block.

They were working their way through the rubble trying to salvage any family heirlooms when they heard a phone ringing. My uncle followed the sound and cleared away the rubble until he found their phone that had been buried. He picked it up and answered, and it was my dad calling to say he'd heard there'd been a hurricane and was everybody okay?

I wasn't here for Andrew, but my stepdad, who I didn't know at the time, was working a building construction job on Key Largo when they announced the hurricane was expected to make landfall there. So they evacuated to a much safer place.....HOMESTEAD!! As we all know, that was where Andrew ended up landing. The motel where stepdad was holed up got hit rather bad, but wasn't destroyed. It was also the first motel to get fixed up, since they had a team of construction workers with their tools staying there!

I did get to ride out Hurricane Charley in 2004 while working at a nursing home in Kissimmee. The owners of the facility left to take care of their own home

and underestimated the storm, leaving no plywood and tools to board up the glass doors in front. I scrambled together a very hasty barricade, and by the time I took this picture the wind was already starting to roar and branches were snapping....

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Charley dropped multiple tornadoes all around, one of which destroyed the old Arcade Theater around the corner....

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and knocked down dozens of old live oaks both by the lake.....

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and on top of houses.....

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and trailers...

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tThe Storm ripped the covers off the local bank's drive up terminals. (but notice the flourescent lights and mirrors are unscathed!).....

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I took this shot from the roof, looking at the adjacent house which our own tree fell on. The trunk of this tree was about 30" thick at the base...

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Here are a couple residents who went out early the next morning to find a totally different scene....

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We were without power for 10 days in the hot Florida heat. A most unforgettable experience!

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Just a late morning roller here in Newport Beach......It is just a reminder for those who forget where we reside......

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Glad to hear that everyone's okay! B)

I'm glad that earthquakes here in the northeast are very rare. There was one 6 years ago, very small, but strange at the same time. I never thought we'd get one here. Can't say that I'd ever want one again, and certainly not the kind that you all get out in CA. ;)

I can happily say that I've also never had a tornado. I'm very scared of tornadoes, and the few times in the last few years that we've had a tornado warning, I was very nervous. The weathermen would show the radar right on our town and say that there was definite rotation in the clouds and found it fascinating! Not so fascinating when it's supposedly right over you! And it was November on top of it. Very unusual weather for november!

But then again, when is unusual weather unheard of in the Northeast!

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FYI to you "quake-deficient" PTU'ers in NYC... it may at least please you to know that there is a seismograph in the Empire State Building constantly monitoring the earth's movement beneath Manhattan. :D

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In 1985 the year my daughter was born my ex and I lived in Kew Gardens Hill,We had a picture window in our apartment facing towards Shea stadium acoss Mt Hebron Cemitary.One night the apartment was shaking about 3 in the morning.My wife woke me and told me we were having an earthquake.I told her it was someone upstairs moving furniture and went back to sleep.Sure enough the news reported the next day that an earthquake about 4 on the richter scale hit the area.About 2 weeks later a small tornado touched down in the area just to the north of our apartment and our picture window exploded ,the glass just missed my daughter going under her crib.My ex ran towards her and got cut with the flying glass needing 2 stitches in her arm.After getting the window fixed a few weeks later we were hit with a hurricane.So within my daughters first 6 weeks of life she went through an earthquake,tornado and hurricane.sleeping through almost all of it.Today she is a happy healthy 23 year old attending graduate school.So all you West coasters hang in times do get better-Jerry

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My cousin Jon and his wife moved to Burbank last week. Here's the e-mail they sent after it hit (but before it made the news).

Kal-El is here. He and Jon were plopping into their chairs for breakfast, and the plopping didn't stop.

"What's that?" I asked, as the table began to hop up and down.

"That's an earthquake," said Kal-El calmly and with some odd "oh -- really?!" to his demeanor.

"Dive!" we all shouted, as we took our places beside the couch. Yes, that's the new earthquake paradigm. Not in a doorway, Not under a table, but beside a large and uncrushable piece of furniture, thereby creating a triangle of safety.

The bucking and rolling went on for about 10 seconds from the first, "What's that?"

The only damage we seem to have sustained is that our newly-hung pictures were slightly askew.

We have survived orientation, and a 5.8 hazing. We are Californians. (well........sort of) Hybrids, anyway.

J

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Jerry I remember the earthquake of 1985. But my watch read a little after 6 a.m. It lasted like 3 seconds. Wonder if it was the same one? Tornadoes seem to be getting more common in this area. And "forgetaboutit" if a hurricane hit Long Island today. There are so many new houses near the water today. It would be a disaster of huge proportions.

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