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That first print is pretty breathtaking Randy--but probably a bit too depressing for me to want to own a copy of it. The tokens are neat though. I can't say that I've ever seen much in the way of memorabilia from the NY Crystal Palace. Thanks.

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The site of present day Bryant park. Just behind (east of) the NY Crystal Palace was the 5 story high Croton reservoir now the site of the NY Public Library. I haven't seen anthing by way of plaques in Bryant park that mentions the Crystal Palace. Another piece of history NYer's forgot.

If anyone else has seen or knows of a plaque, please post a photo or location.

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I hadn't really thought about that Don, but it really is a shame. I was looking at the recently posted photos of Crystal Palace park in London. I know NY's Crystal Palace might not be considered as important historically, but you'd think it would AT LEAST rate a plaque!

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SInce you asked for some more souvenirs from 1853 NY Crystal Palace, I have attached pictures of 3 medals

post-4198-1230172393_thumb.jpgpost-4198-1230172400_thumb.jpg

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and pages from the "Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion" of that era.

post-4198-1230172446_thumb.jpgpost-4198-1230172452_thumb.jpg

post-4198-1230172458_thumb.jpg

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Andy, if I were to cite these in a scholarly article, what citation should I use? Do they belong to a privately held collection or are they taken from a published article?

Thanks.

JMcK

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Can you cite a medal that uses the word "heighth" in a scholarly article? :D

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You'd be surprised at some work done in scholarly articles - that's why editors are overworked.

Now the serious response.

The medallions in question would not be the source cited. Instead, they are pieces of archival material. If anyone wanted to follow up the sources (in this case, whoever owns the medallions), they should be able to see them for themselves. If you recall reading any illustrated history text, it will have listed the source owner of the image, item, etc. Whereas as good grammar is necessary for writing good articles, being able to check and verify the items illustrated is the basis of good scholarship.

To draw a legal parallel, see the medallions as evidence used in a trial. Parties should be able to weigh them and offer their arguments. The citation is the evidence box holding the medallions kept in the evidence room. The scholarly article is the trial transcript.

Unlike library material, archival material cannot be removed like a borrowed book. They are unique items that cannot be replace with copies. The rules of scholarly research require that the same method of citation, even if the medallion has misspelled lettering.

Personally, I would love to see a medallion that lists the engineers on the project.

BTW, Julius Kroehl was a member of the Gold Medal committee in 1853-54 that presented a gold medal to Capt. Duncan Ingraham for his role in the Kostza affair. It would be interesting if one the designers for these tokens were also the designer for the gold medal.

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Just pulling your leg, since you said "cite these" -

Seriously, as someone who writes and presents papers on behalf of his employer and is on the board of editors of a professional society, I know how much I and everyone need an editor, and also how the standards for citations are weakly honored in some drafts. Good luck in your work!

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