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Doug Peterson

1965 vs 1964

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In commenting elsewhere to a post about the Texas Music Hall, I realized that none of the major NYWF web sites really has much to say about the second, and final, season of the Fair in 1965. Moreover, I do not have a 1965 guidebook right now to reference, so I was wondering if we could put our collective heads together, and build a canonical list of changes between the 1964 and 1965 seasons?

The ones that come to my mind right now (and several of these grow out of comments and discussions found elsewhere on this board) are as follows:

1964 ---> 1965

World's Fair Pavilion ---> Churchill Center

Texas Music Hall ---> ???????

Tower of Light ("The Brightest Show on Earth" ---> "Holiday With Light")

United States Pavilion (1965, added Hall of Presidents)

Shea Stadium (Mets, 10th place, 53-109 ---> Mets, 10th place, 50-112)

Admittedly, this represents only a small fraction of the changes between the two years of the Fair. I know, also, that some pavilions shur down prior to the Fair's closure, while others opened late. What else is there to add?

-- Doug Peterson --

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Texas Music Hall--->Carnival

There were a multitude of changes 64-->65, especially if you count changes to pavilion "shows". I too would enjoy working out a definative list.

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Staying with Ford, they changed the lights entering the time tunnel. One year there was a rainbow of color strips from left to right rapidly moving from front to back. The other year there were clocks and other timepieces projected all around, swirling and moving past you. I just can't remember which came first.

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Doug, some changes I noted:

"Fiesta" was added as an attraction in the Industrial area, behind the IBM pavilion. There was some discussion about it on the Board here a few days ago.

The Hall of Education became the Demonstration Center in 1965. Don't know what the significance of that was.

As mentioned, the World's Fair Pavilion housed the Churchill exhibit in '65. The Pavilion of France became the Pavilion of Paris. The Belgian Village was open for the entire season in '65. The Indonesian pavilion was closed in '65 as was the Sierra Leone pavilion which housed an exhibit sponsored by the UN for at least part of the season. These have all been discussed in threads on the Msg. Board here and at the old Boards.

I have a copy of the soundtrack of the 1964 version of Bell's "Ride of Communication" and it was similar but not the same as Ray Dashner's version that I've listened to.

There is a book called "The Fair in 1965" which was published by the World's Fair Corporation. It lists a number of changes in the shows that pavilions featured. Also, there were a number of improvements for crowd control listed. I'll give it a quick scan tonight and see if I can find anything significant and report back.

If you notice, one difference between Marc Williams' "Your Ticket to the Fair" website and "nywf64.com" is that they feature different Guide Books. Marc used the 1964 version of the Guide for his pavilion pages. I used the 1965 version of the Guide for my pavilion pages. You'll find some differences just comparing the pages between the two websites.

Bill

nywf64.com

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I found some interesting things in "The Fair in 1965" that I thought you might like to hear about:

In January, 1965, the following pavilions were being considered for retention in the post-Fair park:

Bell System -- The lower portion of the building may be converted into an indoor recreation center with court games, dance floors, meeting rooms and a small theater for dramatics and dancing.

Equitable Life -- The building may be used as an outdoor adult recreation area with game tables under the roof and adjacent court games such as horseshoes and bocce.

Federal Pavilion -- The building is being studied by the Board of Education as an education and retreat center.

Greyhound -- The Fire Department is considering this building as a communications center and as a base for some equipment.

The Pavilion -- The structural aluminum dome is being considered for use after the building is no longer needed as an exhibit area as the basic element of a walk-through aviary in the proposed zoo.

Moses had this to say in the preface:

We have had some financial problems because actual attendance, for reasons still obscure, did not in the first season come up to expectations. High costs, which affect everyone and everything, have been troublesome. We have made cuts in our budget but must keep the Fair safe and clean. It was necessary, for reasons familiar to everyone, to have an unusual number of police on security, and there have been special jurisdictional labor problems involving maintenance. We may decide to keep the Fair open through Sunday, November 14th ... We aim at 37,500,000 visitors next season and believe that with honest, convincing promotion we shall attract that number.

And here is an amazing thought regarding attendance. "The Fair in 1965" reported the following: The operating season of the Fair commenced on April 22, 1964 and ended on October 18, 1964. During this seas on 180 days, the total paid attendance amounted to 27,148,280. Of this attendance 16,540,053 were admitted on the submission of advance sales tickets. This leaves 14,136,590 advance sale tickets still outstanding.

Caro's biography of Moses reported that, through an accounting error, the entire proceeds from the advance sale of tickes was booked against the 1964 season! By the start of the 1965 season, the money had been spent.

The actual attendance for the 1965 season was 24,518,020. This means that if all of the outstanding tickets were used during the 1965 season, roughly 58% of the admissions resulted in NO REVENUE for the Fair Corp!

No wonder Caro says the slogan "Come to the Fair" was practically a plea.

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Well, one thing that worked in the Fair's favor was the number of tickets that were sold but never used. My mom found a bunch in a drawer, and I must have 20 of them by now. From how often they come up on eBay there were a lot of moms with a lot of drawers!

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quote:

Originally posted by Bill Young:

I found some interesting things in "The Fair in 1965" that I thought you might like to hear about:

In January, 1965, the following pavilions were being considered for retention in the post-Fair park:

Bell System
-- The lower portion of the building may be converted into an indoor recreation center with court games, dance floors, meeting rooms and a small theater for dramatics and dancing.

Equitable Life
-- The building may be used as an outdoor adult recreation area with game tables under the roof and adjacent court games such as horseshoes and bocce.

Federal Pavilion
-- The building is being studied by the Board of Education as an education and retreat center.

Greyhound
-- The Fire Department is considering this building as a communications center and as a base for some equipment.

The Pavilion
-- The structural aluminum dome is being considered for use after the building is no longer needed as an exhibit area as the basic element of a walk-through aviary in the proposed zoo.

Moses had this to say in the preface:

We have had some financial problems because actual attendance, for reasons still obscure, did not in the first season come up to expectations. High costs, which affect everyone and everything, have been troublesome. We have made cuts in our budget but must keep the Fair safe and clean. It was necessary, for reasons familiar to everyone, to have an unusual number of police on security, and there have been special jurisdictional labor problems involving maintenance. We may decide to keep the Fair open through Sunday, November 14th ... We aim at 37,500,000 visitors next season and believe that with honest, convincing promotion we shall attract that number.

And here is an amazing thought regarding attendance. "The Fair in 1965" reported the following:
The operating season of the Fair commenced on April 22, 1964 and ended on October 18, 1964. During this seas on 180 days, the total paid attendance amounted to 27,148,280. Of this attendance 16,540,053 were admitted on the submission of advance sales tickets. This leaves 14,136,590 advance sale tickets still outstanding.

Caro's biography of Moses reported that, through an accounting error, the
entire
proceeds from the advance sale of tickes
was booked against the 1964 season! By the start of the 1965 season, the money had been spent.

The actual attendance for the 1965 season was 24,518,020. This means that if all of the outstanding tickets were used during the 1965 season, roughly 58% of the admissions resulted in NO REVENUE for the Fair Corp!

No wonder Caro says the slogan "Come to the Fair" was practically a plea.

I find it strange they were looking at different uses for some of the buildings. They were designed and built at temporary structures that didn't meet building codes structurally. Why would they come up with these "Dreams" for buildings that had no future even before their doors opened.

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From a Phila Inquirer article on the reopening in 1965 of the Fair:

Changes:

1. Florida - FREE Porpoise Show

- Everglages Exhibit now FREE

- FREE Water Ski Show in Amphitheater

2. World Fiesta - 5 acres, 5 complexes of bldgs. representing 5 continents - 25 cents adm.

3. Churchill Tribute - WF Pavilion - 50 cents adm.

4. Bell System - Moving chairs speed increased by 10% - boost daily ride capacity to 42,000

- New displays included Actual Telstar Satellite, Voice Mirror to let visitors hear how they sound on telephone, Tele-Fair for kids, Weather Phones

5. Tower of Light - New Holiday Show; playing time cut from 25 to 15 minutes

6. DuPont - New choreography and New Film Animation - 4 extra performances daily, separate entrance for those who wish to only view one of the 2 shows

7. Mobil - Increase capacity for participants by 60% by operating film portion of show on both sides of Pavilion at once

...More to follow

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More changes:

8. US Pavilion - Hall of Presidents

9. Illinois - Sound system installed in entrance courtyard to entertain waiting guests

10. Travelers - New exhibit on 1st Floor relating story of Insurance protection to theme of "Triumph of Man"

11. Austria - special Viennese Restaurant

12. New England - New Ski Slope

13. Pavilion of Paris - 2/3 of interior new in 65

New Jersey - Salt Water Taffy Making Machine, Animated Famous Persons exhibit, Comprehensive Toy exhibit

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<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gary Rose:

From a Phila Inquirer article on the reopening in 1965 of the Fair:

Changes:

5. Tower of Light - New Holiday Show; playing time cut from 25 to 15 minutes

<HR></blockquote>

The swivel seats were added to the 'Tower of Light's Magic Carpet' ride in 65'.

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I recall reading that a men's waiting room was added to the women-only Clairol Pavilion for the 1965 season. I have several "What's New in 1965" World's Fair articles that I'd be happy to make available should you wish to build a new page out of this string. I'll check them tonight and see what other changes they mention.

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AFRICA: new snack bar accessible to both pavilion visitors and outsiders; new "safari shoot" gallery with electronic guns. More drummers and dancers; new animals (though Susie the Giraffe's back).

AMERICAN EXPRESS: "New Art, 1965" works of 60 new American and foreign artists on view.

AMERICAN ISRAEL: expanded exhibit has pages from original Anne Frank diary and relics from Capernaum Synagogue.

BERLIN: new exhibit on "The Wall" emphasizing drama of life in Western outpost behind Iron Curtain.

BETTER LIVING CENTER: "Animal Kingdom," new live animal exhibit sponsored by Humane Society.

CAROUSEL PARK: late '64 starter has old Coney Is. merry-go-round; inexpensive food at outdoor cafeteria.

CENTRAL AMERICA: new pre-Columbian gold and jewelry.

CHINA: new restaurant.

CHRYSLER: new musical comedy with Bil Baird marionettes; revamped automotive show.

CLAIROL: expansion of personalized consultations to include cosmetic analyses with hair coloring interviews; doubled capacity; special arrangements for men waiting for wives.

COCA-COLA: "Hall of Reflections" replaces art display at end of "Global Holiday."

CONTINENTAL INSURANCE: expansion of Revolutionary War display.

CONTINENTAL PARK: five rides, go-kart track, wild animals, beer garden, picnic ground.

DENMARK: completely re-designed exhibit area; Specialty Food Shop; new surprises in Tivoli Gardens playground; luncheon version of Grand Cold Table in restaurant.

EASTMAN KODAK: new third theater: "The Searching Eye" film revamped, How to Photograph the Fair exhibit.

FORD: new third entrance to pavilion: Philco animated show-within-a-show. 1965 model cars on Magic Skyway.

GREECE: classical sculpture from National Museum in Athens; "History of the Acropolis."

GUINEA: outdoor market and restaurant with native musicians and dancers.

HALL OF SCIENCE: late '64 entry features Rendezvous in Space, Atomsville, U.S.A. (for kids only) and latest in science and medicine.

HAWAII: extensive revisions and expansion including fashions, horticulture, films, camera show, outrigger canoe rides; food and shops.

INDIA: new artistic items added to exhibit; on-the-spot skills and crafts demonstrated.

IBM: new films for Information Machine in theater.

JORDAN: enlarging Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit.

LOWENBRAU GARDENS: new quick-service stand-up bar; mechanized and animated version of famed Lowenbrau Lion from Munich Oktoberfest will entertain diners.

MONORAIL: fare for kids under 12 reduced to 60 cents; adults same at 80 cents; second ride free.

MOROCCO: one-hour show featuring snake charmers, native dancers and music.

NEW ENGLAND: expanded John F. Kennedy display: new Yankee atomic power, banking and manufacturing exhibits.

NEW YORK STATE: "The City: People and Places," a new exhibition of painting of NYC by NY artists underlining trend to urbanization and industrialization in last 75 years; community performing groups from outside state will augment in-state groups.

NEW YORK PORT AUTHORITY: free concerts by school and community groups at its new Band Shell next to the heliport.

OKLAHOMA: new live entertainment with folk, choral, band music and theater companies.

OREGON: new go-kart track and boat concession; timber carnival continues.

PROTESTANT AND ORTHODOX CENTER: new outdoor stage for performances by choirs, etc.

RCA: Television in Space exhibit includes moon pictures and weather TV'd from space; professional entertainers supplementing guests and celebrities on color TV; new color TV "featurette" films.

SCOTT PAPER: introduced animated forest creatures to exhibit.

SEVEN-UP: an emcee and expanded entertainment.

SIMMONS: rooms designed for more sleeping space replace Enchanted Land; new sleep research display.

SINGER EXHIBIT CENTER: (adjunct of Bowl): new display of Vogue Paris designer patterns in expanded "Millionaire Fabric Collection;" film; state and national flags (sewn on premises) to be presented to visiting dignitaries; hi-fi and stereo demonstration featuring "New Sound at Singer."

SPAIN: new art masterpieces in its galleries; Martisqueria enlarged.

SWEDEN: expanded and redesigned industrial display; new film with ASEA's 100,000 volt thriller; improvement in restaurant and NK shop.

TOP OF THE FAIR: new management offering a world food carnival with "walls of food;" $2.50 admission to fair waived for diners arriving at Port Authority heliport from outside fair grounds; average fairgoers' informal attire permitted.

TRANSPORTATION & TRAVEL: "Here Come the Martians," a show combining live action and film, and other new attractions.

TRAVELERS INSURANCE: saluting firm's 100th year in Canada with display of color pix of our northern neighbor.

U.S. SPACE PARK: exhibits keyed to current space activities like Gemini mission and Mariner's Martian fly-by.

VATICAN: Pope Paul's jeweled tiara--and don't overlook the Pieta.

VENEZUELA: revamped exhibit featuring model of its Angel Falls, world's highest.

WESTINGHOUSE: contents of Time Capsule II on view, to be buried at close of Fair.

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I'm fairly certain that the rainbow of color stripes (similar to the convention then used in comic books to indicate time travel) was used during the 1964 season, with the floating dates and time pieces used in 1965 (I remember the surprise at the change...I had preferred the first effect which...if memory serves, also alternated with darkness and might have been deemed too disorienting for visitors...)

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Hoodlock:

Staying with Ford, they changed the lights entering the time tunnel. One year there was a rainbow of color strips from left to right rapidly moving from front to back. The other year there were clocks and other timepieces projected all around, swirling and moving past you. I just can't remember which came first. <HR></blockquote>

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Matthew, it’s a nice list I am sure this is a pre-1965 season's wish list. I listed what I believe to be erroneous.

CONTINENTAL PARK: five rides, "go-kart track", wild animals, beer garden, picnic ground.

OREGON: new "go-kart track" and boat concession; timber carnival continues.

-- I doubt very much that there were go-kart tracks at the fair. A fourteen-year-old boy just doesn’t over look a go-kart they just weren’t there.

AFRICA: new snack bar accessible to both pavilion visitors and outsiders; new "safari shoot" gallery with electronic guns. More drummers and dancers; new animals (though Susie the Giraffe's back).

-- I spent almost every day at the fair in the restaurant of the African Pavilion. My dearly departed friend Floyd Wendell Brogsdale was the captain of the restaurant and bar. Susie and I ate lunch together many times. Again if there was a "safari shoot gallery with guns" I would have known about it. The guns were not there and a good thing too.

LOWENBRAU GARDENS: new quick-service stand-up bar; mechanized and animated version of famed Lowenbrau Lion from Munich Oktoberfest will entertain diners.

-- We often would rest at the Lowenbrau Gardens. This was a good place to find brochures from other pavilions and other things. Tourist would read pamphlets over a drink and then they would leave the flyers behind. However I don’t recall seeing a "mechanized lion". A young boy who built robots in his basement doesn't overlook things like this.

CENTRAL AMERICA: new pre-Columbian gold and jewelry.

-- Was this the exhibit in the Transportation and Travel Pavilion upstairs by the entrance to 'The Moon and Beyond'?

George you are so right about Ford's 'Time Tunnel', I too was disappointed in the change. Yes I remember now the clocks came in 1965. It was very Disney and cartoonie; the tunnel lost its bite.

[This message has been edited by Hoodlock (edited 09-21-2000).]

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<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Hoodlock:

CENTRAL AMERICA: new pre-Columbian gold and jewelry.

-- Was this the exhibit in the Transportation and Travel Pavilion upstairs by the entrance to 'The Moon and Beyond'?

<HR></blockquote>

Correct. It was called "World of Ancient Gold". There was even a nice catalog for the exhibition.

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The list comes from the New York Sunday News (Daily News) "Coloroto" magazine, April, 1965 (don't have the date handy--I'm at work). Probably it's the Sunday before or after opening day. They were probably working off of press handouts, and there is a disclaimer to the effect that not everything may be as described.

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Just a word about the beer at the Lowenbrau Pavilion. It wasn't at all like the stuff they sell under that name now. It was most excellent, imported from Germany.

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Matthew, it’s a nice list I am sure this is a pre-1965 season's wish list. I listed what I believe to be erroneous.

CONTINENTAL PARK: five rides, "go-kart track", wild animals, beer garden, picnic ground.

OREGON: new "go-kart track" and boat concession; timber carnival continues.

-- I doubt very much that there were go-kart tracks at the fair. A fourteen-year-old boy just doesn’t over look a go-kart they just weren’t there.

Besides the cars at the Avis Pan-Am Highway area next to Kodak (which admittedly look more like motorized kiddie cars than go-karts), I've found another apparent confirmation of the presence of go-karts in 1965. I was just searching through photos for a playground behind the 1964 Hall of Education or 1965 Demonstration Center (trying to figure out what seems to appear in another picture), when I looked at this 1965 picture of the Pavilion of American Interiors across the street. This looks like a regular go-kart (minus an engine), and that's what the signs say! I know nothing more than what I spotted in the picture, but the arrows on the signs seem to point down this little side alley called the 'Avenue of Invention', toward an area that is marked on 1965 maps as 'parade ground' and just before you get THERE, on the left would be the "front yard" of the Oregon Pavilion.

GoKarts02.jpg

© Bill Cotter, Set 30, Picture #006

closeup:

GoKarts01.jpg

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Just a word about the beer at the Lowenbrau Pavilion. It wasn't at all like the stuff they sell under that name now. It was most excellent, imported from Germany.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm suprised no one mentioned the addition of the "Pennsylvania" Pavilion in 1965, avctually an open air building featuring a replica of (what else) the Liberty Bell. Ironically the Pennsylvania Pavilion was located in the Industrial area near the south west edge of the large fountain from which fireworks were shot.

I think the pavilion which served Sierra Leone in 1964 became the United Nations Pavilion for the entire 1965 season; I remember the towering roofs of the pavilion had been repained a bright blue when the United Nations took over the strucutre.

Does anyone remember the Minnesota Pavilion? Every time we went by in both 1964 and 1965, the pavilion was closed

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I don't rember much about the Minnesota Pavilion other than Big Ole:

I don't know if this has been discussed before but Big Ole now resides in Alexandria, Minnesota, just outside the Runestone Museum: <a href="http://www.runestonemuseum.org/geninfo.htm" target="_blank">Runestone Museum</a>

The history of Big Ole is covered here: <a href="http://www.runestonemuseum.org/Big%20Ole/big_ole_history.htm" target="_blank">Big Ole History</a>

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