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Thanks for that information, Bill and Louis. Oh, I may have found a photograph of the Katimavik after demolition--or what was left of it. It is on a site called Post Era Expo 67 Attractions--Where Are They Now. It has a photo taken in 1984 and shows some of the steel framework of what had been the Katimavik along with the still standing elevator shaft which took visitors into the structure. What surprises me is that that steel framework was still there six years after the structure was demolished.

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I found the page you saw

http://expo67.ncf.ca/remnants_of_katimavik_pavilion_p1.html

I don't think that page is right. All of the pictures I can find in my collection show an external elevator lifting into the building - none with an elevator shaft like that one shown. The elevator also looks too large for what is shown, looking like a very wide cab being raised on a hydraulic lift. I very well may be completely wrong, but this just seems odd.

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Thanks for that information, Bill and Louis. Oh, I may have found a photograph of the Katimavik after demolition--or what was left of it. It is on a site called Post Era Expo 67 Attractions--Where Are They Now. It has a photo taken in 1984 and shows some of the steel framework of what had been the Katimavik along with the still standing elevator shaft which took visitors into the structure. What surprises me is that that steel framework was still there six years after the structure was demolished.

That's not the Katimavik. It is either Man the Explorer or Man the Creator, two of the theme pavilions.

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What we see on this picture is not the Katimavik but the remaining of Man the Producer pavilion. This pavilion was officially demolished in 1979 but the bottom section remained until the mid 80's because it was too expensive to bring it completely down. So what we see on this picture is actually the bottom section of the pavilion and the concrete elevator shaft.

Louis

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I wondered myself because it did not look quite right to me, but please note that it is clearly labeled by the person who created the site as the remains of the Katimavik. And we all know that if something is on the internet, it HAS to be true.

PS: Bill, I also wondered about that elevator thing. It certainly was a long time ago, but I clearly remember walking up the inside of the Katimavik--up the stairs in the four corners. I suppose there was an elevator somewhere, but it also did not seem right to me that it somehow stood next to the inverted pyramid. Anyway, thanks for the clarification.

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Here's a view that shows the elevator as well as the staircases.

katimavik-elevator.jpg

I usually took the stairs as there usually was a long line for the elevator, as well as for the funicular car inside the pavilion itself. Today I might opt for a ride though. The Katimavik was big!

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I really liked those lighting fixtures... the ones where the light was reflected from a tube up into a reflector mounted on a pole. Really gave a soft illumination to the site. I'd love to get one for my yard. wink.gif

Yea, me too. Those lights were a distinct feature of that Expo.

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That web site I mentioned above has photographs of Parc Jean Drapeau today and a good number of those reflective lighting fixtures still remain and there are several photos of them--overgrown in some cases. However, I am not certain if any of them are working.

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I am not even sure how many of those lighting fixtures remain. Many were lost, of course, but it appears that there is a good number of them in some of the less travelled portions of the islands. Because the park is in constant evolution, I wonder if there would be any effort to restore the lights to working order or to simply remove them as new construction takes place.

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Great photographs! Thank you for posting them. It is also interesting to see the Mini Rail and a bit of the US geodesic dome. I wonder why they removed so many light fixtures in 1972. That was only a few years after Expo closed and Man and His World was still a fairly vibrant destination at that time.

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This stuff is wonderful. I love the statement on the Eastern Airlines brochure: "Expo was too good to go." No question about that!

I wonder if there was ever any city which hosted an international exposition that was as in love with their fair as was Montreal. What other city worked so long and hard to keep their exposition alive?

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These brochures make me wish I had returned to the Expo Islands more often if only to soak in the architecture as much as possible. I love the Air Canada statement about Montreal having "grace." It truly does. It is a perfect word for ambience of that city. Many thanks for posting these memories.

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1972 brochure "A Great Fifth Year!"

This has a very interesting line in it:

"This year, a shorter season was occasioned by circumstances beyond the control of the City of Montreal and also limited the site to St. Helen's Island."

I would love to have more details on that!

I guess this safely shows that the Ile-Notre Dame pavilions closed after the 1971 season.

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