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Lars Johansson

Hello and a Belgian Waffle Recipe

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Hello. I want to thank Mr. Cotter for the book. It's available here in Sweden so I bought it. It's wonderful. I also have the real officeal guidebook. This is my first post, and I have a question, did anybody, save their waffle, instead of eating it? OK, this was an attempt to joke, but I am going to post a belgian waffle recipe found on a Swedish TV channel. My translation, I have tried my best though cooking is not my thing.

Belginan waffles, I guess this is for 20 pieces, unsure of it though, rectangual form, you'lll need 7.5 deciliters bottled water without bubbles, 125 grams of melted butter, 3 tablespoons (weird Swedish measurement, not the ones you eat soup with, too big, try 2/3 or half of it) of sugar, 2 eggs, 0.5 teaspoon of salt, 1.5 teaspoons of cinnamon, 45 grams of crushed light cookies, 12.5 grams of yeast, 0.5 kilograms of flour.

1. Make the milk a little warm, definately not boiling, just tiny warmness so you can put your finger in it, same temp

2. Insert the yeast by powdering it down into the milk, move around until it has completely disappeared.

3. The mireal water, keep in another bowl, add the crusned cookies until smooth, then add the suger, salt and cinnamon into it.

4. Into the mineral water mix, add the flour and mix.

5. Into the mireal water mix still, add the milk-yeast mix and mix them. Then right after add the eggs as they are, everything in them.

6. Now add the melted butter and mix into it.

7. Let it juststand there until it's exactly double the size.

8. Put into the oven. I wonder how many degrees though, usually we use 225 degrees Celsius or so, maybe that's it. I would suggest that you use the standard temperature for brownies, buns that you use and it's probably going to work. I don't know for how long either, but when they look dark I would bring them out pretty quickly.

I don't know anything about the topping, but I guess I saw some topping recipe here from 2006.

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Hi, Lars, and welcome to PTU. I believe you are one of the most distant member so far. Where in Sweden are you? And thanks for the kind words about the book!

I'll have to see if I can talk my wife into trying the recipe. If I tried it I know it would be a disaster...

Bill

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God dag, Lars! It's great to have an international presence on PTU. I also appreciate the waffle recipe. Tack så mycket! (I have now exhausted my Swedish vocabulary). I shall look forward to future posts.

Cheers!

John

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Thanks everyone. I'm in Stockholm. These are what I guess are "real" Belgian waffles. There are also Dutch Belgian waffles and I believe Brussles waffles or something like that, you know half the people there are Dutch. I want to find out which version was used at the fair, but so far it's probably that your cookis are going to differ from ours. I think you should try, if you have, Donald Duck cookies or Tom and jerry cookies for children, beige and light in colors, and if possible something not so sweet to match our cookies, but ifd it mathches Belgian cookies I don't know. There were also some info missing there on how to prepare the waffles, so I feel a little sad about that.

John, your Swedish is better than the Swedish queen. You even got the å there in tack så mycket. How did you do that? You write smörgåsbord correct too? I have read some about the Swedish smörgåsbord, honestly I don't know what it is, but it seems like you get a peice of bread and then pick whatever you like on a plate. I know it was there on the fair and also in '39. I have tried to find what chrystals and stuff was used in the Swedish pavillion, but NK, Nordiska Kompaniet is not the same anymore, it's morer like a tiny fair in itself, no real Wal-Mart anymore. It was an expensive Walmart or Harrods sort of at the time I guess. I read about the Swedish pavillion here, great photos. I saw some Dala hobby horses. Saab cars are GM cars now probably, were there Saabs at the fair?

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John, your Swedish is better than the Swedish queen. You even got the å there in tack så mycket. How did you do that? You write smörgåsbord correct too? I have read some about the Swedish smörgåsbord, honestly I don't know what it is, but it seems like you get a peice of bread and then pick whatever you like on a plate.

Hi Lars,

Whenever I write something in a language other than English (I have some fluency in German and know a few phrases in several other languages) I use Microsoft Word which allows one to insert non-English letters via the "insert" tab. Then I cut and paste the letters into my post.

Interesting news about Queen Silvia. Given that she was born in Germany and lived in Brazil, does she speak German and/or Portuguese? I have heard King Carl Gustav has a little trouble with Swedish as well, although he is a native speaker. Apparently he has a language disorder of some type.

Smörgåsbords were once very popular in the US but I haven't seen them much in restaurants recently. The smörgåsbord in the US is simply a buffet dinner that usually includes salmon, pickled herring, so-called Swedish meatballs, cheeses (usually including sweet goat milk cheese), breads, salads, and various other foods. Most US restaurants don't use the Swedish letters in the spelling. On my visits to Scandinavia I have often seen breakfast buffets that resemble US smörgåsbords, at least as far as the meats, breads and cheeses go.

Cheers!

John

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...I use Microsoft Word which allows one to insert non-English letters via the "insert" tab. Then I cut and paste the letters into my post.

A lot of work, we just have them on our keyboards. If you switch keyboards in Windows or whatever you use, you could perhaps find them beside P and L, those keys. Some of your other keys such as the apostrophe and some others will move though. Germans probably only have äö, no å.

Given that she was born in Germany and lived in Brazil, does she speak German and/or Portuguese? I have heard King Carl Gustav has a little trouble with Swedish as well, although he is a native speaker. Apparently he has a language disorder of some type.

Silvia has very severe problems with pronounciation, given that she has lived here for a long time. My boss once made a documentary that I eadited and she couldn't say that the king (kungen) couldn't attend, she said kyngen, it's like I am the vice precident and can't say president, if you get my point. The king is even worse, or not that bad, he has dyslexia. Sometimes he can't spell his name, his real name is Carl Gustaf Bernadotte, but he just signs with Carl Gustaf or something and forgets the r, so many signatures say Cal Gustaf. I have seen one and it said Cal.

Smörgåsbords were once very popular in the US but I haven't seen them much in restaurants recently. The smörgåsbord in the US is simply a buffet dinner that usually includes salmon, pickled herring, so-called Swedish meatballs, cheeses (usually including sweet goat milk cheese), breads, salads, and various other foods. Most US restaurants don't use the Swedish letters in the spelling. On my visits to Scandinavia I have often seen breakfast buffets that resemble US smörgåsbords, at least as far as the meats, breads and cheeses go.

What is fun is that those smörgårdsbords are known form the fairs,I guess, but I can't see anything too special about them. Goat milk cheese, I don't know if we have that. What you describe there, seems like something you put on a table for people to pick from and then you have some booze. Herrring is very Swedish I guess, meatballs as well, you can check Google for "svensk husmanskost". What we consume has changed a lot since 1964, which is fun to notice. I'm a vegetarian so I don't go near those Swedish old-fashioned restaurants. I like your US veggie burgers. I think I'll go have one right now.

Cheers (or Skål!)!

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Willkomen Lars! If I'm any kind of baker and cookie afficionado at all, I think that the nearest equivalent to your cookies would be something like Nabisco 'Nilla Wafers, or even Barnum's Animal Crackers. When I try your recipe on Sunday (using a waffle iron instead of our oven) I'll use the "nilla Wafers and report back!

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The recipe was good, but the Belle-Gem mix from Williams-Sonoma was just as good and much easier. :)

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