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Bill Cotter

Here's your chance to own a NYWF legacy

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So Greyhound and American Express were partners in this foray into the taxi business?

Why no Greyhound dog logo? Just wondering...

Also, Magikbilly in the windows of that Mayflower Restaurants there are signs- probably menu items. Is it possible to zoom in on them so we could see what the 1940 prices were like? And were they offering blue plate specials, or filet mignon?

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Good question Randy - by 1940 Exposition Greyhound provided something like 15 different types of transportation within the Fairgrounds, and this was just one of them. The buses had the grey with the poochie logo - this just happend to have the American Express logo (even though in 1940 it was listed seperately from American Express transportation). The cost to ride in this thing was $1 for the first 15 minutes and 75 cents for every 15 minutes thereafter (in 1939)

Those may not be picket signs. This photo was shown a long while ago and I don't think that possiblity even was raised when it was discussed what they were holding. Perhaps some sort of souvenir of more likely something to do with who they are or where they are from?

MB

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The cost to ride in this thing was $1 for the first 15 minutes and 75 cents for every 15 minutes thereafter (in 1939)

Good Lord. What a way for the rich folks to ride.

And what a museum piece it truly is. Wish I could buy and donate it to the Peterson Automotive Museum here in Los Angeles.

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Yes Trey,

I can see Bette Davis being hauled around in one of these easily! As far as zooming in - this is WAY zoomed in already. I also wish I could buy it. I'd lovingly restore it properly. I don't this this is an escorter - I think those were different things that held 1 or 2 people. In 1940 this mode of travel was $3.00 an hour (a little cheaper). This is probably the single best, rarest and most meaningful memory rich 1939 NYWF artifact I have seen on eBay in a very long time. This sure beats that booth! Someone asked long ago what kind of verification I'd accept to prove authenticity - this is a darn good start! I believe that was in the Patio drink discussion where a certain soda fountain thing was purportedly given out at the Fair.

Best,

MB

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At the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego in 1915, you could rent a similar vehicle, but you didn't have to pay for the driver. You drove yourself.

This is crossing the Puente Cabrillo bridge into the main Exposition entrance. I'm pretty sure these must have had gas-powered motors, not electric/batteries like in 1939-40.

10.jpg

(ignore bakertowne- it's a recent watermark)

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Great pic, Randy. Here's a few more of the Puente Cabrillo bridge from different angles...

eno4477.jpg

110puen.jpg

80cabri.jpg

This beautiful bridge was placed on the National Historic Register in 1976. It was almost destroyed by an arsonist in a horribly dangerous blaze three years ago...

[url:50812]http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20040618/news_1n18fire.html[/url:50812]

Then chunks of it started falling to the pavement below a year after that...

[url:50812]http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20050102/news_1m2bridge.html[/url:50812]

But as of January of this year... it still hadn't been properly retrofitted. Sure hope they can save it.

Cabrillo Bridge needs more work

The Cabrillo Bridge in Balboa Park will require some work to make it seismically sound, a Caltrans spokesman said yesterday.

That's the early indication from a study of the 90-year-old bridge that Caltrans started last year. The retrofitting can be done from inside the bridge's hollow columns, so the look of the bridge won't be changed, said Caltrans spokesman Hayden Manning.

But the state isn't saying yet how much the job will cost or when it will begin. The full report is not ready for release, Manning said.

Caltrans has been working on the bridge since early 2004, after chunks of concrete fell onto a Balboa Park walking path. The repairs have ballooned since then, after engineers discovered more damage than expected.

The seismic study is the first for the historic bridge.

It was passed over in the early 1990s when the state retrofitted many highway bridges to make them safer during earthquakes. The Cabrillo Bridge's stout columns were thought to be so strong that it fell low on the priority list then.

The city of San Diego owns the bridge, which was built for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition. Caltrans maintains the span over state Route 163 through a contract with the city.

The city will probably apply for state or federal funds to pay for the seismic work, as it did when the San Diego-Coronado Bridge was retrofitted in 1997.

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