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Bill Cotter

Concession stands - 1939

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I had fun restoring this shot of several concession stands:

39-concessions-1.jpg

It was very obliging of those visiting the Fair that day to stay away so this unobstructed view could be recorded for posterity.

For my fellow landfill fans, here's a closer view of some stuff that would probably be worth a fortune today:

39-concessions-2.jpg

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Hey look, there's a plastic Topping Unisphere on the middle shelf.

<!--sizeo:1--><span style="font-size:8pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->[just kidding- made you look, didn't I? ]<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

Actually, I wonder what those light bulb things are on the middle shelf, under the N of the word Souvenirs?

Maybe illuminated snow globes?

Or maybe they weren't for sale and they're just.... light bulbs. Boring. It's more fun to imagine they're limited edition crystal Perisphere lamps by Tiffany or something. Priced at fifty depression-era cents, no doubt.

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Hi Bill,

nice photo - an ESC Souvenir Stand taken right near General Electric - Steinmetz hall is right on the upper left edge of the photograph. It is from these stands, there were 50, that almost all of my 3-D collection comes from - all ESC stuff in the ESC bags etc. (under 20 items - slides....love the slides..) Would that I could see just a little more clearly - all those items are registering in my memory but only just - like patterns in a game I can almost ifentify but not. All I can see for certain the 11x14 ESC color souvenir book on its side in a rack - the one that was sold in 1940 with a blue felt T&P glued over the "1939" - all litho color and a very nice although common book. The larger version with embossed silver cover is really the one to get! Alas, I sold my copies of each and settled on the Deskey Official Souvenir Book in hardbound (cloth) which really covers all. The 11x14 b/w printed photo Souvenbir Book is also very nice - manufacturer is eluding me. ESPC or some such for ESC. All I really recall is it was printed in LI City and was the first book of its kind I bought many years ago.

See the aluminum bolt there on the upper left? Right in the Plaza of Light, looking West towards Perylon Hall (the squiggly column rising in the middle). I have a color slide of this bank of stands taken from one of the tiers of the Pertroleum Building looking down and out to Westinghouse - for some reason this bunch of booths was not photographed often. There was another bunch like this by uh..Lincoln Square and the Avenue of Pioneers near the 2 light towers.

Very nice to see all those souvenirs!

Thanks,

MB

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I have one of those pennants or one very similar. And I have several of the tiny T&P salt and pepper shakers one can

spot in the lower right portion of the photograph.

Just look at all of that great stuff in there. I would love to have just five minutes in that little shop.

Thank you for sharing this image!

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Coin collectors would love to just go through the change tray in that cash register.

Probably all kinds of goodies in there. :thumbsup:

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Hi Randy,

I think the snow globes are under the "IRS" of "SOUVENIRS". Left of that seems to be a row of tumblers. I wonder of this could be enlarged or enhanced any further? Lots of goodies there

RE coin collecting - I recal when I bought a 1939 spherical glass bank with early logo (more like 33 CoP) the seller could not be deterred from the belief that the coins were worth more than the bank (normally I'd expect them to put there BY the seller, but not in this case)! A few SL 25c, a few Wash 25c, and a lot of pennies (incl an 1899) and nickels - all with incredible wear. It was more fun getting them out! No 1936 Matte Proof Lincolns I'm sorry to say...nor a 16-D Merc. Yes, I checked the backs of the SL's quickly, no 1916 - TI or TII. But, the bank is beautiful. Normally, I'd have left it as it ws, but I was afraid of the weight and the coins really obscured the bank!

MB

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"i love the lettering they used back then "

You and me both, Bunny. Such a beautifully clean font-- and I love the way it stands out three dimensionally on the facade. Classic.

"I was wondering if they were some of the T&P bulbs like was sold on eBay a few weeks ago."

I think they are T&P lamps indeed, Bill.

"I was afraid of the weight and the coins really obscured the bank!"

My bank came empty, MB. Typical. :rolleyes:

Thanks so much for sharing such a great (and rarely seen) photo! The birthplace of much of my landfill, no doubt!

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<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Also... I wonder if ORANGE CRUSH was the still popular soft drink-- or some kind of fresh-squeezed/orange whip product?<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Same stuff, I believe. I've seen that dispenser at antique advertising shows.

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Same stuff as the soft drink you mean, Mike? For some reason, I didn't think Orange Crush was that old.

And yes-- I second Doug's notion-- welcome to PTU, Margi!

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Yet another essentially useless, but nonetheless interesting bit of trivia I've learned at PTU!

Think I'll go celebrate by downing one of these!

orangecrushbottles.jpg

(note: the logo on the third and fourth bottles matches the one on the drink stand marquis)

orangecrushwe0.jpg

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<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->It was very obliging of those visiting the Fair that day to stay away so this unobstructed view could be recorded for posterity.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

From the looks of the GUIDE BOOKS stand on the far left with its black canvas flap still down-- this pic was probably taken sometime right around the fair's opening that day. And since the souvenir stand is fully stocked and ready for business... but no one appears to be behind the counter... maybe this photo was actually proudly snapped by that person? Hard to imagine anyone else thinking enough of the area to grab their Brownie and snap a pic.

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The picture is from a long sequence of shots (about 105) taken by a visitor, then nicely preserved in an album I paid way too much for on eBay - and one that I'm glad to have gotten! There are some great views. One thing that was interesting is that the glue used to originally mount the prints to the pages had failed and the pictures were loose, which made scanning them easier. Under the spot for each photo, in the area now covered by the remnants of dry glue, were penciled descriptions of most shots. That was great for identifying some of them - but no one would have seen that unless they had pulled the picture off the page. I can't figure out why the original owner hadn't just labeled them below each shot.

Bill

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These types of photographs are often the very best. They bring the Fair to life. These are the very things

the visitors saw on their trip to the Fair. In any event, Orange Crush was very popular in mid-Century America.

It first appeared in 1906 and it was very successfully marketed. I have seen photographs of other Orange Crush

beverage stands at the Fair so I suspect they had some sort of agreement to market their drink at the Fair. It is

now sold only in local markets. It can still be found in parts of the Northeast (it is still available in Upstate NY), but

I understand it is no longer nationally marketed.

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Its finally nice to see the source of most (if not all) my collection of fair memorabilia. And in front of one of my favourite buildings (save for the T&P) no less! To think how long those items survived it the future. In fact, I could be looking at the exact item I have no, but a different time.... I'd give anything for ten minutes there too.

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Joey, I know just what you mean. It would be really something to look at all of those great treasures when they were new and sparkling, and to spot things not yet surfaced for our collections.

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It is nice to see that NYWF 1939-40 management saw fit to place some design restrictions on concessionaires. I've looked at aerial photos in Stanely Appelbaum's "New York World's Fair In 155 Photographs by Richard Wurts and Others" and can't really identify where they were located. It looks like there are several along the Avenue of Transportation adjacent the GM and Ford Pavilions. It is mentioned that the ones pictured here are near the GE Pavilion but they aren't readily visible in any pictures. Any idea where others might have been located?

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