Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DeniseFuller

NYWF Music?

Recommended Posts

My husband ( always the disc jockey!) is putting together a NYWF music CD for me. Will be a surprise, so I have no idea what songs will be on the final compilation. Just curious, what would be on your NYWF music CD?

I would want a collection of pop hits from the time period, as well as songs specific to the fair.

Denise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One song for a 1939 NYWF disc would be "Man And His Dream" by Jack Teagarden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the 64 Fair I always had a transister radio in my ear.Some of the songs I remember being popular back then were Ronni by the 4 Seasons,World without love-Peter and Gordon and,Walk on by-Dionne Warwick.Whenever I head any of these tunes my mind goes back to the Fair-Jerry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good song choices. Thanks. I'd love to find some of the music that was used in the shows at the 64/65 fair. I keep thinking about some absurd dance tune about orlon - I think. Wish I could remember the pavilion.

God, I love the Four Seasons!

Denise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All good song choices. Thanks. I'd love to find some of the music that was used in the shows at the 64/65 fair. I keep thinking about some absurd dance tune about orlon - I think. Wish I could remember the pavilion.

God, I love the Four Seasons!

Denise

DuPont.

You need to pick up a copy of Ray's audio archives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne,

Thank you! I couldn't remember. I do need to get the audio archive.

As for "Small World", Vladimir, my husband is putting some of the song at the very beginning of the CD, just to set the tone. He's recording it to sound very distant, then it will fade away to the first song on the CD. He works at Westwood One Radio Network, so he has lots of wonderful audio equipment to work with for the project. Of course, we could probably get the same effect using Audacity recording program at home.

Denise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->God, I love the Four Seasons!<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Well then, Denise, you're gonna' LOVE the BBQ movie! Trust me.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Denise,

You should have my VAULT III CD-ROM in your collection at this time. You're welcome to make use of all of the DuPont songs from that archive. I'm sure Mr. E.I DuPont de Nemours could use the publicity.

Also, the HAWAIIAN LOVE SONG from the Hawaii Pavilion is one to consider as well.

Ray D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Denise's defense-- although I've heard plenty about the BBQ movie on PTU-- most of us P(Pacific)PTU'ers still haven't seen a single frame of it here on the west coast. So when's the big Hollywood premiere, Curtis and Terry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->I DID discount that, Trey. No offense intended.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

No offense taken whatsoever, Mike! But being a coupla time zones in the future-- you east coasters are occasionally a little ahead of us when it comes to info.

Still, I do hope that BBQ might have a west coast screening. We may be small in number, but we (P)PTU'ers are mighty-- and I have no doubt we could pack a theater!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband ( always the disc jockey!) is putting together a NYWF music CD for me. Will be a surprise, so I have no idea what songs will be on the final compilation. Just curious, what would be on your NYWF music CD?

I would want a collection of pop hits from the time period, as well as songs specific to the fair.

Denise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband ( always the disc jockey!) is putting together a NYWF music CD for me. Will be a surprise, so I have no idea what songs will be on the final compilation. Just curious, what would be on your NYWF music CD?

I would want a collection of pop hits from the time period, as well as songs specific to the fair.

Denise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a great summer for electric pop music, the VOX amps, round wound guitar strings, plate reverbs, Pultec EQ's and all sorts of electric keyboards came out

Satisfaction (Rolling Stones)

I Feel Fine (The Beatles)

I Can't Help Myself Sugar Pie Honey Bunch (The 4 Tops)

Mr. Tambourine Man (The Byrds)

Help Me Rhonda (Beach Boys)

This Diamond Ring (Gary Lewis)

Downtown (Patty Clark)

Hang On Sloopy (Rick Derringer)

Do You Believe In Magic (Lovin' Spoonful)

The Kids Are Alright (The Who)

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't kill me. From the youngster "Its a Small Small World"

I am SOOOOOO glad you brought this song up!!! In the past I would be ridiculed (all in fun!) for liking it so much at the time! After all, I was a 6/7 year old girl during the Fair - the perfect audience for this ride!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a brand new version of "Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow" recorded by They Might Be Giants on the soundtrack of the new Disney animated film "Meet The Robinsons." It's available on iTunes.

And having seen the film earlier today, I'd also have to say that many of its futuristic design elements feel like they were inspired by the 39/40 NYWF...

mtr_02.jpg

Although this humorous image was clearly inspired by Disneyland itself...

MeetR.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Trey,

I agree, absolutely. I see Chrysler, the Hall of Music, Corona Gates...the base of the diorama in the Railroads Building (ok, maybe that's just me.. ) The Technicolor look only helps the effect. Thanks!

MB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

William Joyce has stated over the years that he’s drawn on the 1939 fair and the machine age in his much of his art & design work.

One truly talented and amazing man.

William Joyce Shines Light On The Making Of Disney's 'Meet The Robinsons'

The Shreveport Times

March 27, 2007

By Alexandyr Kent

William Joyce has a new movie opening on Friday but he won't say much about it. Apparently, Disney's "Meet the Robinsons" is a secret worth keeping. "I can't tell you anything that happens in this movie, because it will ruin it," Joyce laughed while touring his new exhibition at artspace, "The Art of Disney's 'Meet the Robinsons.'"

"You don't really realize how much of a Rubik's Cube it is until the cube starts falling into place," he said. He later conceded the movie involves time travel to an elaborate future world, lots of inventions, and one of the coolest families in the world.

Joyce is a Shreveport native, a celebrated children's author and illustrator, and TV and movie producer. He is executive producer of "Meet the Robinsons." The movie is based on his book "A Day with Wilbur Robinson." Turning it into a animated motion picture took 17 years.

The exhibition at artspace will examine the creative processes of Joyce and an army of Disney animators. It will pair Joyce's and other animators' character and set sketches with final frames from the movie. It will show storyboards and drawings for key and entertaining sequences. The exhibition also will offer a lot of hands-on arts' activities for kids and their parents.

Disney started developing a movie for "A Day with Wilbur Robinson" in 1990, months before the book was released to bookstores. But Disney could never quite decide what it was going to be.

Initially the idea was to adapt Joyce's wildly detailed book into a live-action feature. Joyce drafted multiple screenplays. Various directors and Disney executives got close to greenlighting it in the '90s -- including director Peter Jackson ("Lord of the Rings" trilogy), for a day -- but they never flipped the switch.

Between 1990 and today, Joyce was busy with many other projects too. He was caring for a body of more than two dozen children's books, which bear his name.

He was producing television series like PBS's "George Shrinks" and the Disney Channel's "Rolie Polie Olie." The latter earned him three Emmys.

For the movie industry, he was creating conceptual characters for "Toy Story" (1995) and "A Bug's Life" (1998). He also was fine-tuning the characters and world of "Robots" (2005), a project he oversaw from start to finish as production designer and producer.

Secretly, a young executive at Disney kept nurturing the "Robinson" project along. Around 2000, they decided to adapt the project into a computer animated film.

Though they ditched Joyce's scripts, they stayed true to his vision. He kept working with Disney to develop new characters. They mapped out a bigger world than found in the book.

And then in 2004, just months before the rights to "A Day with Wilbur Robinson" reverted back to Joyce and a year before "Robots" would hit the big screen, Disney's Michael Eisner decided to green-light the project.

Joyce, now an executive producer for "Meet the Robinsons," suddenly realized their deadline was fast approaching. "We've only got three years to finish it," Joyce said. "Three years seems like, to regular mortals, a long time. But in the animation business it feels like not enough time. You have to do everything from scratch. There's nothing there. You're starting out with air inside a computer."

What "Meet the Robinsons" has become is an elaborately conceived story of its hero, Lewis. The orphan and boy genius travels into the future to meet the Robinsons, a wildly inventive family of Wilbur Robinson, and the evil Bowler Hat Guy, who tries to stop Lewis from going home.

Joyce said the movie has remained faithful to his book and his ideas about the future. Working with the Disney creative team, which was led by director Stephen Anderson, has been rewarding.

"It's also really fun to collaborate with people, especially people who draw better than I can," Joyce said. "And almost anyone at Disney can. What I have is a good imagination and fun sense of possibility and story."

People who see the movie and walk through the exhibit at artspace will learn about the movie's strong design influences, like 1939 New York World's Fair and the Futurism movement in industrial design from the 1930s and 1940s.

"There is so much about this (movie) that was about that wonder of technology that people had in the 1920s and '30s," Joyce said.

He liked the idea that technology promised to make the work a perfect place of six-day weekends, five-hour work weeks. "We will have lives of leisure and health and happiness because we're going to invent all this stuff that's going to make life grand and perfect and better," Joyce said.

Pam Atchison hopes people gain from seeing the exhibition. She is executive director of Shreveport Regional Arts Council, which oversees artspace.

"I think it will be exciting for our community because most people are very familiar with the book," Atchison said. "This is going to be a sensational educational program. There are some great, thoughtful hands-on activities for taking moments and characters from the movie and turning them into your own fun."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×