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Doug Seed

Building Permits for Pavilions

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I was just thinking about all the permits needed for buildings and utilities at the fair.

Did all these guys have to trudge into Flushing City Hall a zillion times, or was there a "Building Department Office" right there on the Fairgrounds?

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Well, that explains it.

Must have been hidden in the shadows of NJ and the Brass Rail.

Thanks for solving the mystery, Trey!

Jeeez, I guess it was there all along and we just never noticed it!

index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=3683

post-86-12477571302_thumb.jpg

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I think we've heard here on PTU a few years back that the Fair Corporation successful argued and got from the City some agreements to grant waivers or dispensations to certain parts of the City Code, specifically for the Fairgrounds, simply because of the temporary nature of the pavilions. In other words, you shouldn't have to build them to last forty years.

But yes, there was a Permit Office on-site---

permit.jpg

By the way, if you go from the red arrow directly to the left, right next to Bruce Nicholson's office, you can see that they had an internet conference room. They were WAY ahead of their time!!

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Geez, What a magnificant structure in all it's glory......Wonder what happened to the large blue NY Pavillion medallion that hung from below the tent roof....Wasn't the entrance path under that display.....So long ago, and so painful to what it became, or rather what it was allowed to become......

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I did see a NYWF Construction Code book up on ebay once. I believe one resides in the NY Public Library.

They're pretty common, M.E. I believe John P. has them up frequently.

Dry reading!

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That floor plan is interesting. The Map room and boiler room were bigger than RM's office. But he did have his own dining room which was also bigger than his office. The duplications room was also quite large. I guess the needed big mimeograph machines. Or was Xerox around back then?

I remember when I found out when the fax machine was invented I was suprised. I thought it was born in the 1980's. Shows you what I know.

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I remember a fax machine in about 1980, that required you to wrap your document around a cylinder and then place the cylinder in a machine that spun it. Some kind of sensor stylus would slowly pass over the spinning cylinder reading the data as it sent it over the telephone wire. It had no memory, cache or anything of the sort. It didn't even have a dialer, just a cradle that you'd lay your telephone receiver into.

That was when I was in the Air Force. They had an enlisted sergeant designated to run it- they wouldn't let us officers even touch it! I'd have to sit there and wait about 10 minutes to get my document back, with the enlisted guy taking his time loving his chance to make an officer wait. The baud rate was probably measured on a pony express scale. But that's all we had back then, and using it could save a couple of days transit time to get something important back to Washington.

I never saw that machine at work receiving a transmission. They told me it worked the exact same way- the operator would wrap a blank sheet of paper around the cylinder. But I didn't see an ink reservoir to feed ink through the stylus or anything, so I wasn't sure exactly how it worked. Just every now and then our office secretary would give me a message that there was a fax for me, and I'd have to go over to the building next door to pick it up from Sergeant Smirk.

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We had a machine just like that when I started with the Navy in 1973, Randy. No one knew how to use it so it just sat there. One day we decided to fire it up and man was it noisy. We eventually sent something to another office and got one back from them, but the quality was pretty bad. Most of what we were doing was classified and there was a big sign warning that the fax was not for classified documents, so back it went to gathering dust. They sure have changed over the years, haven't they?

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I remember a fax machine in about 1980, that required you to wrap your document around a cylinder and then place the cylinder in a machine that spun it. Some kind of sensor stylus would slowly pass over the spinning cylinder reading the data as it sent it over the telephone wire. It had no memory, cache or anything of the sort. It didn't even have a dialer, just a cradle that you'd lay your telephone receiver into.

That was when I was in the Air Force. They had an enlisted sergeant designated to run it- they wouldn't let us officers even touch it! I'd have to sit there and wait about 10 minutes to get my document back, with the enlisted guy taking his time loving his chance to make an officer wait. The baud rate was probably measured on a pony express scale. But that's all we had back then, and using it could save a couple of days transit time to get something important back to Washington.

I never saw that machine at work receiving a transmission. They told me it worked the exact same way- the operator would wrap a blank sheet of paper around the cylinder. But I didn't see an ink reservoir to feed ink through the stylus or anything, so I wasn't sure exactly how it worked. Just every now and then our office secretary would give me a message that there was a fax for me, and I'd have to go over to the building next door to pick it up from Sergeant Smirk.

Randy, it worked by heat/or light. We had the same type of fax machine. The paper was specially coated with a surface that felt like the old old xerox paper (shiny) and prone to fading. I think the paper had a adhesive strip on one side to adhere to the cylinder. The stylus had three settings: send, receive and off. Ours had a three and six minute speed. The machine or company that made the machine was called Qwip.

Information and Technology magazine had an article about a newspaper in the 1940s faxing newspapers into homes using radio waves. The homeowner had a machine that would take those radio waves and image the one page newspaper. Needless to say, it was expensive and never went anywhere.

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<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Information and Technology magazine had an article about a newspaper in the 1940s faxing newspapers into homes using radio waves<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

Very interesting, Mark. And not entirely unlike the way they send them over the internet today-- which may just put the real thing out of business if paper sales keep falling.

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I did a little internet research last night on facsimile (fax) technology.

The patent was granted in- get this- 1843! And it's still the basic technology that is used. I wonder if somebody still gets royalties off that 1843 patent?

From the late 19th century until the mid-60's, the technology was mostly used by people like newspapers to 'wire' photographs. That's how a photo from half way around the world could be on the front page of your morning paper in 1947.

In the 1920's they perfected the art of transmitting over a radio connection. This became the dominant way of doing it for many years for businesses with high volume needs.

About 1960- the industry finally agreed on 'standards' for office use- so the sender and the receiver no longer had to have an identical machine.

In 1966, Xerox rolled out the first fax machine that included an acoustic coupler (a cradle that you could lay your telephone handset on), which enabled you to use your regular phone line. Until then, if somebody wanted to fax something they had to have a dedicated land line, or a radio connection.

This is said to have been the breakthrough that made it practical for normal office use. From then on, it was just a matter of continued miniaturization and getting rid of that acoustic coupler by building in a dialer. And technology also added memory- to scan the whole document before dialing, so as not to waste precious long-distance rate time. Eventually of course they got rid of the cylinder and simply combined the device with a flatbed or "feeder" photocopier (a "xerox machine"), which reduced the scan time by a huge amount. Also they added computerized compression techniques to increase the effective baud rate over the telephone.

Of course today the advent of digital scanners connected to computers which are connected to the internet make fax machines unneeded. But just about every office still has one- in some cases mostly gathering dust. Mostly because there are some isolated businesses that won't accept e-mail attachments in lieu of a fax. My bank is one.

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Good stuff Randy. I am suprised your Bank does not accept email attachments. All the banks my firm does commercial appraisals for require electronic pdf copies now. I think all are legal now since the fed made electronic copies & signatures carry the same weight several years back.

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And…in 1980 Hoodlock created the first Global Facsimile Network called Syndifax, for syndicated facsimile.

If you wanted to fax something down the street or around the world, it often came through my office on 48th Street and Vanderbilt in NYC.

Later the company was acquired by RCA Global…

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Before digital technology, the "standard" fax machines used an audio tone that varied between 1200 and 2400 Hz (cycles per second) to represent tones from white to black. This technology was built into the earliest weather satellites too. Instead of rotating an image on a drum, the whole satellite was sent spinning to scan a picture of the earth as it went overhead. Later satellites that used better imaging techniques still included circuits to convert the higher grade images to the old fax format so legacy machines could receive them. These satellite photos also were (and maybe still are?) tansmitted along with weather charts by shortwave radio from a number of stations on the coasts and in Hawaii. Today (if they are still on the air) you can receive them on a short wave set and display them on your computer using a little software program, by plugging the shortwave earphone jack into your sound card input. I have the software, but haven't installed it in the last few computers, as the stations were hard to pick up here in Illinois, and I think some of the stations were being decommissioned.

Current fax machines speed up the process with digital coding that skips quickly through the white spaces on a page of text, whereas the old technology was a fixed rate.

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Well, I see this building permit topic got sidetracked into fax technology, so to get back to the original subject here are some permit forms for various work you may need on your pavilion.

Note that you need to use the form printed by the union shop, and fill it out using a typewriter in either quadruplicate or quintuplicate, depending on the type of work. Be sure to attach architect's or professional engineer's drawings in quintuplicate also.

...

By the way, I recently read that FAX is still alive for doctor's offices, as their computerized medical record systems do not all talk to each other yet.

Form 22 Building Permit.pdf

Form 14 Elevators.pdf

Form 15 Sign Permit.pdf

Form 16 Refrigeration Equipment.pdf

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I wonder if there's a form somewhere for ordering more forms?

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