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For any PTU members who wonder what I do when not researching the World’s Fair, can see my work at <a href="http://hoodlock.googlepages.com/weddings" target="_blank">http://hoodlock.googlepages.com/weddings</a> and the corresponding links.

Unfortunately for some of you who may be interested in the other art I do are out-of-luck, as is not suitable for general audiences.

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Thanks Bill, just like you my profession is influence by my World's Fair experience.

I know there are many of us out there who can trace their life's work to the Fair's inspiration.

Would anyone else care to share how the Fair shaped their occupation?

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Well I ended up in the aerospace industry working for Boeing, and no doubt the World's Fair had an influence in that direction. High tech / space age and all that stuff.

But then again I'm a financial analyst & business process integrator, so unless you count the IBM Pavilion, which I'm not even sure whether I attended, I'm not sure of any World's Fair connection there.

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Randy you are a man with many accomplishments, however, are you saying that you may have gone to the IBM pavilion but cannot remember?

Randy, if you were in Erro Saarinen’s masterpiece you would have remembered.

What I cannot understand is why his IBM pavilion has not gotten the world recognition it derives. The fact that a Google search for ‘Erro Saarinen’ and ‘IBM’ only gets my quotes is appalling.

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I was young. I definitely remember Escorters & Glide-a-Rides, the Unisphere, going up an escalator to start a ride at a Car Mfr Pavilion (which I have determined to be Ford), Sinclair Dinoland, the Chrysler cars "floating on water jets", the Kodak "big cube", getting a Dinoland moldarama dino, getting metal pinback badges handed to me at various pavilions, and oh yes, a distinct memory of dad parking the car in the Shea Stadium parking lot and us walking over the boardwalk bridge. I also remember the New York colorful roof (at least walking past it) and MAYBE walking on the map inside (kind of a fuzzy memory), seeing the Big Tire (but not riding on it), walking past Vatican but not going in (and hearing parents say why), and dad racing to Kodak to buy film as the Fair closed at night (unsuccessfully).

Other than that, we probably DID visit G.E., G.M. Bell, and who knows maybe IBM, but I just don't remember. Knowing my parents, we probably saw the Billy Graham movie too. I was 8.

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Nice work Bruce.

Except for the time I spent working with my Dad and his Bamboo business in the 60's my Fair infulence lagged. We all morphed into real esate appraisers and I later specialized in commercial and industrial appraisal only.

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Thank you for your kind words Mary Ellen. I know there is a World’s Fair seed in you somewhere, just add water or Bourbon.

Randy I am reluctant to bring this up; however, you do know it is not a ‘cube’ at Eastman Kodak, unless you are in the fifth dimension where cubes have five vertical planes.

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"Unfortunately for some of you who may be interested in the other art I do are out-of-luck, as is not suitable for general audiences."

I'll bite

I saw the stuff posted - very nice. I am curious to know what this work is PM me an example is possible - like to see. I also have a portion of my output (both my painting and the related photograpghy I work with) that is also "not for general audiences," but is certainly is nice to look at and nicer to produce.

To answer the question, I don't think the 1939 Fair has really influenced me (apart from the obvious slide obsession and photo sales), except to cause sadness at the loss of the "PostFair Dream" for lack of a better term. Of course, I could not attend the 1939 Fair - you guys are speaking of the experience of being there in 1964/65 so that's quite a different thing. One of my mentors - his whole life was shaped by attending the 1939 Fair.

MB

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Randy I am reluctant to bring this up; however, you do know it is not a ‘cube’ at Eastman Kodak, unless you are in the fifth dimension where cubes have five vertical planes.

Well yes- as a kid I thought maybe it was supposed to resemble one of Kodak's new flash cubes, but mostly I remember how bright the pictures were at night. Being at the Fair for only one day didn't allow much time for detail study- I left that for 21st century computing adventures, when I can dive into a lot more detail than would have ever been possible at the Fair (unless I spent two years on site).

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Very true Randy, for twenty years I filled a suitcase with knowledge, in two years on the internet I filled rooms with what we as a group have uncovered.

If the internet can propel my humble field of study, just think what the doctors and scientists are sharing and learning.

Perhaps in time, we can recover from the loss of the library at Alexandria.

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Bruce, wonderful creative stuff! Well done.

Although I was only 6-7 years old at the fair, it launched me into my interests in science. After the fair I grabbed ahold of Star Trek in its early years. Once I grew up (relatively speaking of course), I went into the science field with a biology degree, first Clinical Genetics, then molecular biology research. I then transitioned into the operations side as a Facility Manager (you need to know science to be good at operation of a lab) and now Director of Facilities for <a href="http://www.psychogenics.com" target="_blank">PsychoGenics </a> .

My other hobbies are science related- <a href="http://estf.20m.com/fossil%20index.htm" target="_blank">Fossils </a> and <a href="http://64nywf65.20m.com/amber3D.htm" target="_blank">Amber, 3D photography</a> and collecting ancient artifacts.

We know a bit more about each other, all different, but we already know that the fair keeps its influence on all of us.

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Well, as some of you may recall from other posts, I was 20-21 y.o. during the Fair years, so my interests had already been developed by other things - the main one being color TV, the technical side of being able to see at a distance. This really was first reinforced by visits to the Museum of Science and Industry in my home town, Chicago. Visiting the Fair was really putting a cap on it, not only for the RCA exhibit, of course but for the other industrial exhibits too.

I wonder how many other people here have thought it would be fun to work for Disney Imagineering? The Fair really made that attractive, but my preparation led me to the consumer electronics industry, first at Motorola and now at Zenith (what's left of it). Besides, I'll bet Disney didn't and doesn't pay as well, just because there are plenty of people who'd like to work there. (OK, that's a little sour-grape-like, but I know that to be the case with some other prestigious places I've investigated.) Recently, my work mainly involves engineering management and a lot of standards committee meetings.

Anyway, seeing yourself on TV has now become passe' with the advent of home camcorders, so I guess you need other things to wow the masses. Still, it's a great dream to think of another World's Fair some time, and remember what a wow it all was in the 60's.

For an incomplete view of some of my scattered interests, see http://www.bretl.com - probably should update my curriculum vitae there, but haven't got around to it.

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Wayne,

I love your mechanical TV!!! Are you one of the people responsible for the HDTV technology that is in use now? I know it's a broad question, but I seem to remember that Zenith Labs had a lot to do with this.

By the time I was old enough to consider Disney, some of my peers already were working at the old Orlando animation studios. Let's just say that I opted for Warner Bros. instead.

I wonder how many other people here have thought it would be fun to work for Disney Imagineering? The Fair really made that attractive, but my preparation led me to the consumer electronics industry, first at Motorola and now at Zenith (what's left of it). Besides, I'll bet Disney didn't and doesn't pay as well, just because there are plenty of people who'd like to work there. (OK, that's a little sour-grape-like, but I know that to be the case with some other prestigious places I've investigated.) Recently, my work mainly involves engineering management and a lot of standards committee meetings.

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all this talk of imagineering and disney mixed with the futuristic view of the fair makes me want to recommend a very interesting novel to all of you called "down and out in the magic kingdom" by cory doctorow. the story is set a hundred or so years in the future and centers on a man who, thanks to overpopulation and safety issues, lives and works at disney world-- which has been largely preserved as is and carved into ad-hoc blocks of owner/employees who govern the place. it's a quick read-- but not unlike "a clockwork orange," a very imaginative (and occasionally frightening) view of what the future might hold but how it never quite shakes itself away from nostalgia.

here's a link to the amazon listing if you're interested:

<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Down-Magic-Kingdom-Cory-Doctorow/dp/0765304368" target="_blank">Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom</a>

p.s. - i've enjoyed visiting all your sites, but don't have a website of my own-- because just like ptu-- that would only give me one more way to avoid actually working!

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Thank you all for the kind comments. It is an excuse for not doing gainful work, I guess, but you can see by the date of last update that I don't let it take too much time, except maybe in yearly spurts.

Yes, I have been involved in the digital TV system, working with the people who invented the transmission part that gets the bits from the transmitter tower to your antenna. (Do you have an antenna? Statistics say that 85% of homes have cable or satellite, and about 78% of TVs are connected to these services. You can buy a digital TV now that gets you all the local programs you are used to, plus usually some extra channels that are carried in the digital signal for free. For example, a couple of the local network-owned stations in Chicago are providing 24 hour weather, and one is providing 24 hour news reruns; plus WGN has a second channel of music videos; and PBS has three channels - one with only high-definition programs, one with the same programs you see on your old set, plus a "create" channel with all the DIY programs. My neighbors are flabbergasted when I show them what I pull in for free - some think the only way to get TV is through a cable.)

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Excellent point, Wayne. HDTV buyers are rediscovering the TV antenna to suck up all the broadcast HD material.

I'm about to bite the bullet as sets have become reasonable in price, but research tells me that there's more HD programming on the air than in the cable.

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It is interesting how similiar our professions and hobbies are outside the fairgrounds.

Until recently, I worked at TV Guide which included television, printing reproduction, and even 3-D (lenticular and an episode of "Medium").

Looks like I have a lot of websites to bookmark and revisit in more detail!

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The NYWF certainly embellished my interest in audio recordings but most of the shows were actually canned presentations delivered over elaborate sound systems. As I try to recollect the LIVE sounds, there's only a few that come to mind. One was Guy Lombardo's Orchestra playing nightly at the Tiparillo Bandstand. The second was the mobilized Cities Service Band conducted by Paul Lavalle.

I should also mention the BELL AERONAUTICS SYSTEM that propelled a man over the Unisphere as well as onstage at WONDERWORLD. Now THAT was audio!

Although there were live shows such as the Florida Pavilion's water ski show, it too was heard mainly over loudspeakers with the exception of a few roars from engine exhausts heard by folks in the front rows.

The narrator preceding the GE SKYDOME SPECTACULAR was standing at a lectern, but her voice was amplified and projected via loudspeakers.

I was also somewhat influenced by the RCA three color gun system since in earlier years I got into CBS-COLUMBIA in Long Island City on a company mission which allowed me to visit their proposed color wheel system. Good thing that Rube Goldberg system was never approved by FCC!

My personal audio experience in the sixties and thereafter consisted of my owning AMPEX tape recorders, H.H. Scott Turntable, KARLSON speaker enclosures, JBL speakers, CAPS Condenser microphone, UHER portable reel-to-reel tape recorder, Avery Fisher tuner / amplifier, Gray viscous damped tone arm, etc., etc.

Although not live, my recording of Morton Gould's "Come up from the Valley, Children" (part of the Bell System ride) was preserved on tape for 37 years. I learned that the Morton Gould Archive at the National Library was incomplete without this recording. Since this seemed to be the only existing recording of the composition, I submitted it and it was accepted, completing the archive at the National Library of Congress.

Ray D.

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Speaking of interests that the Fair might have influenced-

we had a similar thread a few years ago here on PTU and somebody asked who was a member of a marching band in either high school or college.

And the response was practically zero!

I'm not sure what that's supposed to mean, but it would seem that people still interested in a World's Fair after four decades are unlikely to be musically inclined?

We have a lot of new PTUers since that question was posed a few years ago- are any of you former "bandies" ? (and if you actually performed with your marching band at the World's Fair, that's worth an extra fifty seven points on the relevant fame index )

(Me? - no - I was too busy with sports and asking girls out... )

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I was a bandie! Played alto sax, never played at WF. No fame or fortune. We did, however, play at Indiana Pacer games, McDonalds openings and the old Coney Island (Cincinnatti).

More incredibly boring but lucky trivia:

Sophmore, Pacer game, January, carrying old sax in hand from bus to Coliseum, slipped on ice, sax went flying 10 feet into air, smashed to smithereens.

Parents later took me to buy new one (in Catholic schools you supplied your own instruments, except for things like sousaphones and tympany), and the salesman talked them into the most expensive one they had. Maybe $400 or so. Many years later I find out that the Selmer Mark IV is one of the most desirable saxes ever made, still worth a couple grand or so.

Moral of story? Throwing your sax into the air to prevent a broken neck is a smart investment!

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