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Chmnofbrd

Mini Trylon & Perisphere

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You had me until you said Elwood Suggins and Maude Frickert. You wouldn't fool any Jonathan Winters fans with those!

Well, I had to plant a few clues that this was a bogus story...

I thought a few of you would recognize the names as characters from the old Jonathan Winters comedy routines. I also thought the term "stately home" might give it away as well, as there is nothing really "stately" about this house at all (or the neighborhood for that matter!).

I came across this house by chance back in December, and don't really know why they have a mini Trylon & Perisphere in their front yard. Someday I'll have to write the owner a letter to see what the real story is...

Best Regards,

Kevin

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Hi All,

The wrong size was the give-away for me before I even read the story. Trylon way too tall, and Perisphere a touch too small.

MB

Elektro - "Very interesting stuff, MB. Any tips on preserving old postcards?"

Hi,

What kind? My knowledge of cards only ranges from 1905-1940 or so. and just Cunard Mauretania really. I can advise re storage for real photo cards, photographs and printed cards etc.

MB

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OMG I was suckered again I thought that was a doctored photoshop picture. I'm real dim today LOL

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You Guys,Look a bit closer at the photograph.You will see concrete and wooden posts that are holding the front porch up. Looks like someone sawed in half a couple of trylons

Regards,Dave

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Elektro - "Very interesting stuff, MB. Any tips on preserving old postcards?"

Hi,

What kind? My knowledge of cards only ranges from 1905-1940 or so. and just Cunard Mauretania really. I can advise re storage for real photo cards, photographs and printed cards etc.

MB

I had in mind the postcards that my parents sent back from the NYWF in 1939-40. How should I store them?

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Hi,

Well, I keep my postcards in soft plastic sleeves (archival, with no plasticizers like PVC) - these fit 4 to a page in postcard sleeve "pages" which then go into an album. I keep my albums in a plastic box, which is not really good as this causes gasses from other photographic prints, slides and other collectibles to become concentrated - but I do have some silica gel on there and one could use a sacrificial material I suppose, much like a (smart) coin collector will use sacrificial annode in his coin storage system. And this system is temporary until I have sorted through all the stuff I have collected. As long as you keep them from being handled they will be fine. No attics and closets. I seem to recall you had linen cards and those are not as delicate as real photos so they will hold up fine. Exposition Souvenir Postcards were lithographed onto decent paper so they won't go brittle in the near future - I think that was one of the makers of your cards but I can't find the thread at the moment. I am recalling a purplish night view, vertical format, of the T&P from the Plaza of Light. Card A-........49?? 47?? I don't remember anymore, but that would be an ESC "Official" card. They (ESC) also made sepia cards printed by.......? I am getting old!

Here is an address for products: <a href="http://www.the2buds.com/rp.htm" target="_blank">http://www.the2buds.com/rp.htm</a>

Best,

MB

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MB,

Here's a link to <a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?s=&showtopic=5461&view=findpost&p=38767" target="_blank">the postcard topic</a>. Thanks for the information.

E

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Hi Elektro,

Thanks. I see I was close - A-43, not 47 or 49. I love those cards, and the matching ESC view books. There is a large one with an embossed silver and blue cover that has different images than the postcards and the smaller view books (not the postcard folders). There is something about the color on these that I always liked. Lovely cards you have!

MB

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I know nothing about this picture except it's dated 1964. It would have been very easy to add a trylon to this perisphere.

1964giantball.jpg

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Something about the picture of that radar installation inspired me to try and place the Trylon and Perisphere within a different visual context. So after a few minutes in PhotoShop... here's where the muse led me... right down a familiar road back to 1939. We certainly aren't in Kansas anymore.post-1405-1227324544_thumb.jpg

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Gee world'sfairrent,

Where did you ever find such a nice avatar image?? Drop me a line if you like - I have some stuff for ya Grover Whalen would make a good "wizard" excellent image BTW.

Best,

MB aka Eric

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Hi Randy,

Now that I think about it, Grover would be THE WIZARD with the flames and spooky stuff and strength and panache (sp?), but you know that behind that curtain pulling the levers would be Fiorello " No more free lunch!" LaGuardia.

Best,

MB

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Glad you all enjoyed my little trip down the yellow brick road. Of course, so much about the streamline moderne Emerald City of the classic '39 movie looks like it could've been plucked right out of Flushing Meadow-- the mighty T&P looks right at home in Oz. -Trey

P.S. - I'm afraid to email you, MB-- your bottomless treasure chest of photographs is a constant temptation for my far-from-bottomless wallet!

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A while back I had posted this shot of the Kodak Pavilion area after the Fair closed:

cam328-2.jpg

These displays allowed visitors to be photographed in settings from the Fair. Much of the discussion focused on the mini Trylon and Perisphere. Over to the right, though, was a setting for photos based on the Parachute Jump. Here's a shot I just finished restoring that shows it in use in October 1940:

39-kodak-parachute-1.jpg

The guy sure looks happy, doesn't he?

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A bit of a resemblance to Charlie Chaplin.

By the way, with a couple of other "painted into the picture" parachuters behind the posing subject, I'm not sure whether this was an ode to the Lifesavers Parachute Jump, or just a "thought I'd drop into the World's Fair" humorous photo op.

Since the parachute says Kodak instead of Lifesavers, I opt for the latter.

Here is the postcard version:

66057_F_For_the_Biggest_Thrill-_Come_Down_to_the_Worlds_Fair.jpg

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This was an homage to the Parachute Jump. The man is seated on a bench like that used on the Parachute Jump, complete with a rope to pull on to (supposedly) pull the rip cord. He's holding onto the rope in one hand.

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Racy stuff for its time, Randy. I'm sure that postcard wasn't for sale on the fairgrounds!

More info here:

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?showtopic=4154" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...?showtopic=4154</a>

Perhaps a bit risque by 1939 standards, and certainly politically incorrect by 2006 standards.

I'm still missing card "C" by the way, if anybody has it.

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Wow. It all reminds me of a rare hardcover cartoon book I have called TRYLONGS AND PERISITES: THE WORLD'S UNFAIR GUESTS which took a sort of comical aim at the first fair. Will try to post some pix here later.

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