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Chmnofbrd

Mini Trylon & Perisphere

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There was another picture of this on here but I can't find it

http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.com/u...ery_6_96576.jpg

Visitors Taking Pictures at 1939 World's Fair

Two women pose on a Kodak photo posing stand during the 1939 New York World's Fair.

Image: © Peter Campbell/CORBIS

gallery_6_96576.jpg

Photographer: Peter Campbell

Date Photographed: 1939

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OUCH!

Gee Bill - gimma a warning before posting a demolition shot like that! They hurt! It seems you did not restore the image? I took a crack at it but leave the posting of your images to you. This is one of my favourite subjects for Fair photographs and slides - common as they are (you always get at least one or two) sometimes you see the less photographed Kodak Photogarden displays - like the Dali facade or the "zoo-cage". One of my best "people" slides is of a woman sitting on one of these T&P's. My fav b/w photograph of visitors is a killer shot of two young men playing around on the T&P.

Best,

MB

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Hi Bill,

That tweak gets an A+ Thanks. You know, what is really unusual is color slides of the yellow "footprints" that Kodak painted around the grounds, or the seldom photographed "photo-frame" through which you took "a good photo". This of course resulted in rather generic Fair photography - along with the obligatory fireworks images and you have a pretty good description of many albums (can't really hold the "wasted" fireworks photographs against anyone though - all that color and light and stereo music - wasn't the Lagoon named the most beautiful fountain of all time by some fountain experts?).

I imagine the same was true of 1964/65 re the same photographs over and over?

Best,

MB

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That sure is a sad sight. It looks like someone has already ripped the trylon off the smaller version. I cant make out what that is to the left of the larger one. A clock?

Jim

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nice...thats the parachute jump in the background.Hmm are those lifesavers dangling on the tower?

Nice work

Regards,Dave

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Yes, I was thinking the same thing. I wonder what became of the little trylon and perisphere. They deserved to be rescued and preserved but I suspect they were not.

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Here's a picture of my mother posing with the mini Trylon and Perisphere as an 18-year-old bride on her honeymoon at the fair.

ArleneWorldsFair.jpg

David (AKA Elektro)

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Hi All,

you've all seen my contribution before - perhaps Elektro has not so I re-post below. Question - I have a lot of these with several different "settings" including the zoo cage and Parachute Jump mock-up - but only 1 or 2 of the Dali that was there - you just stuck your head through a painting basically. Anyone else have one of these Dali snaps?

Best,

MB

Below for Elektro:

kodaknewexpsoureandadjusted3.jpg

Eastman Kodak Photogarden, 1940 New York World's Fair © EKL Image Collection

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Thanks, guys. I have scanned a couple of postcards that my parents sent back. Is there a place on the forum where it would be appropriate to post them? One is of the Trylon and Perisphere and the other is Ford exhibit "Cycle of Production."

David

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Yes Elektro, we'd love to see your parents' postcards.

By the way, unless there's something on the message side that you'd rather keep private, many of us like to read the interesting observations of World's Fair visitors, almost as much as seeing the "picture side" of the postcard.

This is as good a place as any to post them:

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?showforum=81" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...hp?showforum=81</a>

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Yes Elektro, we'd love to see your parents' postcards.

By the way, unless there's something on the message side that you'd rather keep private, many of us like to read the interesting observations of World's Fair visitors, almost as much as seeing the "picture side" of the postcard.

This is as good a place as any to post them:

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?showforum=81" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...hp?showforum=81</a>

OK, I have posted them <a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?s=&showtopic=5461&view=findpost&p=38767" target="_blank">there</a>.

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Hi Elektro,

Sorry - forgot to say "excellent family photographs". I would love to have any souvenir at all from my dad's trip in 1939. It would mean so much to me - you are very fortunate to have those photographs. And Randy is right! We LOVE to see what is written on the backs - sometimes color descriptions of flowers, or comments on the diplay or show observed. Even comments on the taste of various foods and the service and cost of things - like 35 cents for an awesome ham dinner at the Aviation Restaraunt.

I pay huge premiums for some postcards (usually line issued or Real Photographs) from the liner Maueretania depending on PM date, location of PM and message - some can be of extreme importance. I have one Kodak photocard from November 30th, 1907 - unique, a very good amatuer portrait of the Cunard Express Liner Mauretania with a man posing on the day she left NY for her maiden return voyage back to Liverpool (actually developed and postmarked at 11:am - before she left - on the same day!!!!) that shows the heavy fog that Saturday morning - fog that slowed her initial departure speed, but lifted and allowed her to take the Blue Riband from her sister on a quite historic journey. It among my best cards - I have another from someone working aboard during her construction and mailed from Wallsend.

The card also documents, visually, the damage she sustained on her maiden voyage to New York. It was likely purchased on the street from a photographer with forethought - good business sense to set up in front of "the current big thing" (literally - 790 feet) and sell snaps or negs of people posing in front as this was big news. Kodak would produce your photographs on heavy stock for the mails at no extra cost - they even produced in 1903 a camera - the one used here - that already had a white strip in the negative for you to wite in. Many of these pre-loaded cameras actually had 100 exposures! America's greatest painter of seascapes, Winslow Homer (1836-1910) had an early 100 exposure Kodak No. 1.

Well, I better show the image now after all this talk...please do forgive the b/w image and copyright - this may be used for a book cover or licsensed and is extremely rare, much more so than any color Fair images I could ever own - even my earliest construction. I also ought not to show the back - the gist of the text is above. The signs on the right on the ground (the rubble is from the construction of the new Chelsea Piers officially opened in 1910) advertise suits and raincoats for $10 to $30 from "Vincent".

From an upcoming article I have written on the subject - "...she departed on her maiden return voyage at 1:35 P.M. on Saturday, November 30th and passed the White Star liner Baltic along the way which had left New York two days earlier. Despite initial fog, she made the crossing in four days, 22 hours and 29 minutes, averaging 23.69 knots and taking the Eastbound Record from her sister." The original card, from a glass negative, is so sharp you can see the sliding doors leading to the Bridge.

Best,

MB

Pier54PTUcEKL.jpg

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Very interesting stuff, MB. Any tips on preserving old postcards?

This isn't directly related to the New York World's Fairs, but the influence on this sculpture at a fruit stand in southern Indiana is obvious.

BigPeach.jpg

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...I wonder what became of the little trylon and perisphere. They deserved to be rescued and preserved but I suspect they were not...

Actually, the mini Trylon and Perisphere ended up in Portland, Oregon - of all places!

post-1026-1222526870_thumb.jpgpost-1026-1222527015_thumb.jpgpost-1026-1222527450_thumb.jpg

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=2098" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...pe=post&id=2098</a>

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=2099" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...pe=post&id=2099</a>

<a href="http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=2100" target="_blank">http://www.peacethroughunderstanding.org/i...pe=post&id=2100</a>

Shortly after the Fair closed in 1940, Portland businessman Elwood P. Suggins purchased the mini T&P from the Eastman Kodak company for fifteen dollars, and then had them promptly shipped to his stately home in north Portland, where they have sat ever since...

Over the years, a few slight modifications have been made to the Trylon (stripes, some additional stiffeners on the sides, and a little "collar" near the top), but it and the Perisphere have remained remarkably well preserved in the 65+ years since the Fair ended.

Current homeowner, Maude Frickert, says "Yeah, we power-wash all the bird poop off them and give 'em a coat of Glidden white every couple of years, but that's about all the maintenance they ever need."

When I asked Mrs. Frickert if she knew the real story behind the mini T&P and the '39-40 Fair, she was shocked to learn the truth. "Really?! I had no clue that the funny looking ball and pyramid in my front yard came all the way out here from New York City. And to think, my husband was going to tear them down a while back to put in a new septic tank, but luckily, we decided to hook up to the city sewer lines instead!"

Best Regards,

Kevin

PS - Happy first day of April!

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