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Randy Treadway

Pictures of the Day

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August 1964

It didn't take long after arriving in the Fairgrounds for our historical friend, the geography teacher from Indiana, to migrate toward the Hall of Free Enterprise and snap this picture. This wouldn't seem too out of the ordinary by itself- it wasn't one of the more popular pavilions- but the photographer took care to frame this photo quite a bit better than most HoFE pictures.

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Whoever came up with that slogan on top of the columns must have loved that recent Supreme Court eminent domain decision. Hah!

The very next photo takes a strange twist.

Our teacher walks around to the back of the building and snaps a photo of a back door. Nothing particularly interesting about a back door is there? There's a probable Allied Maintenance guy sweeping up in front of the door, and a nerdy looking guy wearing a bow tie approaching on the left.

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But what's that sign on the door? It says:

National Schools Committee

For Economic Education, Inc.

Enterprise Economics

Classroom

The 'hanging sign' isn't legible from this angle. So I wonder what that's all about?

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Our school teacher then spent the rest of the day doing the usual tour of the Pavilions, taking plenty of pictures.

The next day, our teacher returned to the Fairgrounds and spent almost the entire day continuing seeing World's Fair pavilions and taking pictures.

.....but, toward the end of the day, he returned to this odd back door on the Hall of Free Enterprise.

This time, a small group of people has congregated outside the door. An eclectric group indeed, there seems to be somebody with a clerical collar, a mobility-challenged person (in 2006 parlance), an African-American female, and a crewcut guy in Bermuda shorts. What could these people possibly have in common? They're chatting with each other.

Hey- maybe we can read that 'hanging sign' now!

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....it says Adelphi University.

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Now we're getting somewhere! But where?

In the next picture, our group is still chatting, and one of the guys has a cup of coffee and a tasty morsel of something- maybe a Belgian waffle. There's a guy on the left that looks like he's lecturing a tall guy with a camera. Overnight, a Mr. Both poster has appeared in the window too.

Hey look- the door's open a crack now! Let's see what's going on inside!

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As the sign on the door indicated, it's a classroom! Complete with chalkboard, bookshelves, and odd-looking desks arranged in something less than a classical classroom arrangement. This looks a bit more informal.

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The next photos shot by our photographer are back in front of the HoFE columns, and there's Casey Stengel! (see other PTU topic). He then ends the day shooting typical fireworks pictures at the Pool of Industry.

So what was going on here, and what's that classroom reached through the back door?

Remember, our Indiana School teacher started his day at Adelphi University, and he and a group of people rode the LIRR trains to the World's Fair. And he ends up in an Adelphi University classroom at the Hall of Free Enterprise.

I decided to take Mike Kraus' advice and check the Official Guidebook first instead of as a last resort, although the likelihood of finding anything pertinent in the Guide Book for an arcane thing like this would certainly seem remote, right?.

WRONG!

Here's the last section in the Official 1964 World's Fair Guide Book, in the entry for the Hall of Free Enterprise:

ENTERPRISE ECONOMICS, B.A. 204-0.

This is the title of a graduate seminar offered by Adelphi University's Business Institute and accredited by the State University of New York. Adelphi faculty members and distinguished outside economists lecture. Two or three credits toward an M.A. degree can be earned in the seminar, which is given in two-week periods of 30 classroom hours.

So that's what was going on in the classroom!

So why was our intrepid teacher/photographer there?

He could have been looking to pick up a summer credit hour or two toward a Masters degree, or maybe to keep his Indiana teaching credential current.

Or maybe he was invited to be one of the guest lecturers. I lean toward the latter, since he went to Adelphi University first, before going out to the Fairgrounds. And besides, my research showed that he had already received a Master's degree way back in 1947.

Have any of you ever heard of this Master's program offered by Adelphi at the Hall of Free Enterprise, or run into anybody who participated?

This has to be one of the least-known "events" that happened at the World's Fair. As my photo captions suggest, it took me a while to put two and two together and try to figure out what was going on- i.e. 'why would somebody take pictures of the back door at the Hall of Free Enterprise?

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Randy, by amazing coincidence I just was reading an old newspaper article on this last night! It was in the crate of clippings I just bought. I'll post a scan as soon as I can. Some timing indeed.

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This is so great, I hope we never run out of more finds like this. His picture of the HoFE is the best one I have ever seen of it.

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Now THAT is some trivia. I couldn't think of a stranger (and better) place to earn some credits. Great detective work!

PS- how many photos do you think even exist of this classroom? I'd put money on it that you may have a monopoly.

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I wonder if students had to pay admission every day. Imagine how tough it would have been to concentrate on class with all of the temptations of the Fair outside.

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Maybe they provided each registered student with a gate pass, so they didn't have to pay every day to get in the gate.

That would be a great deal for somebody who is on "summer vacation" anyway. Just come out to the Fairgrounds every day for two weeks, spend a little time in a classroom, and see the rest of the Fair every day as a side benefit.

Let's see- it was 30 classroom hours over a two week period- probably Monday through Friday only- so ten class days- that's 3 hours a day. That leaves a lot time for Fairground exploration!

Oh yeah- Belgian waffles on break time.

I wonder if they allowed those Arlington hats with the big feather in their classroom?

Maybe someday we'll find a 'graduation certificate' for the class.

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These seminars or classes remain one of the least known aspects of the World's Fair. If anybody finds anything else on it, please share.

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While everybody was looking at the rear door and those people I noticed that the Kodak pavilion was not in the first picture, but it appeared in the later picture. Whats up with that?

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While everybody was looking at the rear door and those people I noticed that the Kodak pavilion was not in the first picture, but it appeared in the later picture. Whats up with that?

The real explanation in the “Case of the Missing Kodak Pavilion” (sorry, I must have been watching too many Perry Mason reruns lately...) is that the two pictures are taken at slightly different locations and angles, so the background fields-of-view are different.

If you look closely at the hanging sign by the door in the first photo (Photo 1) and again at the same sign in the second photo (Photo 2), it is quite obvious that angles of the two shots are not the same:

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The first photo was taken at an almost perpendicular angle to the rear façade of the Hall of Free Enterprise (and the sign by the door is seen almost edge-on), while the second photo is taken at a much shallower angle relative to the façade, and the more of the sign is visible (almost a 3/4 profile).

The reason you don’t see the Kodak Pavilion in the first photo is because it is just off to the left, and out of the field-of-view of the camera (depicted in red in the attachment below). Because the second photo was taken from a slightly different location, and is looking just slightly more to the north, its field-of-view (depicted in blue) does include the Kodak Pavilion.

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Incidentally, Bill’s tongue-in-cheek comment about things going “awry at the Hall of Magic” is not that far from the truth - this principle of shifting perspective is what magicians like David Copperfield use when they make large, obviously immovable structures like the Great Pyramid of Giza or the Statue of Liberty “disappear”...

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Proof positive that at times things went awry at the Hall of Magic.

Speaking of magic acts, check out the length of the hair of the girl in the dark blue dress in pictures #3 and #4. How did she do that? :)

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