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scrap metal - the worlds last great ocean liners


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#166 xl5er

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 12:00 PM

Why is a Seaport Museum interested in an artificial reef? Would money change hands- i.e. a Scuba Diving Association would pay the museum something to take it off their hands, and it's the divers who would then sink it?
I assume the museum is private and not a public (government) affair. How did they get the Olympia to begin with?


The Olympia's significance is right behind the Constitution...


Despite being involved in the Oceanography racket, I gave no thought to the financials behind artificial reefs.

Randy ya got that right re the Olympia's importance. It is a missing link, a "transitional form" between sail and steam.

I happened to be perched on a Kodak moment cliff when the Reagan-revamped New Jersey sailed out of San Diego enroute action stations in 1985 (?) and got some telephoto shots. Those hulls were legendary for shutting down adversary radio traffic just by their awesome presence and capability of firing Volkswagen size shells for many miles onto a dime.

#167 Bill Cotter

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Posted 19 August 2010 - 01:36 PM

I think if they just close it they still incur most of the expenses, such as dock rental, as well as have a pretty hefty liability if it sinks. By saying they are considering sinking it they might just be trying to alarm people and get a donation like the SS United States did when it was looking like it would be scrapped.

#168 magikbilly

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 04:59 PM

Hi All,

In line with this thread - today marks 103 years since the MV of the R<S Mauretania November 16, 1907. This photo below is pretty scarce and was taken just after 7:30 that rainy evening.

Attached File  maiden departure westbound 11.16.07 small.jpg   63.2KB   119 downloads
With approximately 50,000 onlookers present, the Mauretania left the Prince’s Landing Stage in Liverpool for her maiden voyage to New York at 7:30 p.m. on November 16, 1907. Despite extreme weather, she set a daily distance record of 624 miles in 25 hours – faster than the Lusitania. For two hours during the height of the storms encountered on her first westbound crossing, while struggling against winds of 50 MPH and with 60 foot seas, she could barely manage 3 knots an hour. A very dangerous situation developed on the bow when the 10-ton spare anchor broke free and had to be secured manually. The Mauretania reached New York on November 22, making the voyage in five days, five hours and ten minutes and averaging 22.21 knots. She departed on her maiden return voyage at 1:35 P.M. on Saturday, November 30 and quickly passed the White Star liner Baltic along the way which had left New York two days earlier. Despite encountering initial fog, the Mauretania made the crossing in four days, 22 hours and 29 minutes, averaging 23.69 knots and taking the eastbound Blue Riband from her sister and holding it for the next 22 years.

Best,
Eric

#169 Larry L

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 08:40 PM

I was just visiting the battleship Texas in Galveston, built in 1913. I asked what the ship was like below the water line since it looks good up above. The docent said, yeah, it's rusting below the water line and leaking, but they plan to tow it in a couple of years to a place that they can drain and then fix it. I also saw the Battleship Alabama in Mobile, but I didn't go on it. I was messing around on old destroyers when I was in the Navy.

#170 Bill Cotter

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 11:12 AM

Here's a new book on the Bremen & Europa that I just got in and really enjoyed.

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I contributed four pictures of the Europa while she was sailing as the Liberte. It's not on Amazon yet but I found it listed online at http://www.mainmastb...ls.asp?id=29862

I'm still reading it but think it's a great addition to the libraries of fellow ship enthusiasts.

UPDATE: Here's a US address to order it from as well: http://bremeneuropab...opaAmerica.html

#171 magikbilly

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:28 PM

Hi All,

Neat book Bill! The last ocean liner image I will likely restore for a long while is published just now - I was able to develop a "new" photograph of the Titanic's sister ship the Britannic at Mudros in 1916 with a P&O hospital ship alongside. I give a link to the authors webpage and you can see a preview of the image I did. Enlarge the screen and you can see it all clearly (crtl&scroll out w/mouse). Mark is a great guy and I have worked with him before on a few books (recall all those unpublished never-before-restored color slides of the R.M.S. Aquitania I did?) and articles for the Titanic Historical Society and so on - all of which can be seen at his website one way or another:

Mark Chirnside's Reception Room

Well, I am pleased to share this bit below! :) I hope you enjoy it - I am rather proud of this one.

Hi Everyone,

I am pleased to announce that the pilaster from the First Class Lounge of the Mauretania (1904-36) I mentioned a while back is fully restored in display at the Segedunum Museum at Wallsend. The site is perhaps 1,200 feet from the Mauretania’s launch cradle (gone since 1959). This new museum is just north of the former location of the platers' shed, the frame turners' shop and the timber shed at the old Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson Yards. More information about this museum and display will follow – this post will focus on the pilaster. I am also supplying an evocative candid of the Lounge for this pilaster display as well as a really dynamic unpublished photo taken from a tug under her stern, tied to her, at about 2:05 p.m. on October 22nd, 1907.

It was a little over a year ago that I was contacted by a friend to authenticate this rather large section of African mahogany. I certainly did due diligence, and in depth, but it was obvious to me it was indeed genuine just from looking at as I recognized it straight away - short line of solid provenance aside. I have been asked to examine carved wood and plaster capitals said to be from her before, but few, if any, such instances have yielded genuine finds beyond the odd treen and unusual scrap item.

I then spent time researching the origins of this pilaster, evaluating its condition, the symbolism so carefully carved and the techniques used to create this fine gilt decorated pilaster. The story about Palestinian carvers being brought in is just that - a story. I also detailed its interesting history once removed from the ship. Then I set about finding a good home for it. It was very important to the owner (and me) that the pilaster not be cut up and resold, but that it be restored and displayed for the public f possible. The materials below are just a part of the result of this research. We were very lucky to have found the ideal home - and so very near the original location where it was carved over a century ago.

I am not prepared to discuss provenance in detail at this time as the previous owner wishes anonymity. I can say it was intended for Bristol and was never far away from that location. Furthermore, it was never installed in what is now the Java, and it was not part of the Great Tew Estate Sale. I provided three detailed photographs to show you some of the superb craftsmanship and quality of this piece before restoration. It is interesting to compare these photographs with the wood now in the Java. More photographs, as well as additional information regarding the museum's function and history and as the display opening, are forthcoming.

From my research: “...the pilaster has the gold skirting, carved fluted pilaster and the golden double ram’s head capital atop. Found near the sets of double doors which led out of the Lounge, these pilasters framed the adjacent sitting and writing rooms as well. They were also employed in each alcove and on the corners of the aft bulkhead alongside the statues of Columbia and Britannia.

Having never been altered, painted or re-installed since 1936, this example retains its original finish. Portions of the reverse have the typical dark grey graphite-based coating intended to reduce friction and noise between these large joined sections at sea. On the reverse and in hidden areas are some characters and markings from its original carving, installation or possibly from its reassembly for resale by The Mauretania Syndicate. The pilaster is in "fine" condition on the whole and has the wear and marks expected from 27 years of service and subsequent storage.

The skirting is of carved mahogany molding decorated with gold paint and detailed with the Roman crossed ribbon motif which appeared repeatedly in the ship’s decor. Two of the three sections of skirting remain attached to the pilaster, slightly loose, with the third segment requiring a minor glue repair. There is a small rectangular notch beneath the front left crossed ribbon on the skirting which reveals a small bit of original hardware. The tiny insert intended to conceal this is present and slips right back into place. There may be other concealed hardware inserts.

The fluted mahogany pilaster above the skirting, with its hand-carved gilt motif of stylized acanthus flowers, is beautifully intact and exemplifies the superior craftsmanship this ship is known for. It is not surprising to find the ancient technique of carving both wider and thicker at the bottom with a gentle taper toward the capital to subtly enhance the perceived height. The pilaster has four small equidistant holes running up each side from the original installation hardware.

The golden capital atop is of the stylized Scamozzi design typical of the First Class Lounge. The double ram’s heads denote strength and nobility with the spiral horns serving as volutes. The capital is adorned with a central medallion of Britannia wearing a stylized Corinthian helmet establishing maritime dominance. The portrait is surrounded by triumphal English laurel foliage and fruit; it is further decorated with ornate ribbons and a globe.

Missing are some of the smaller, more fragile elements of the capital, and the body of the capital is cracked in half just right of the medallion (a clean, break easily repaired). The lost bits include the swag suspended between the two intricate rams and approximately three fourths of the two rams' fur "pendants" which hung from horn to horn on each of the ram’s heads. A small portion, perhaps half of one ram’s fur “pendant,” remains on the left. If desired, the missing elements can be recreated from the photographic record and the originals in the Java at Bristol (although many columns and other features were removed from the pub during recent “renovations” despite the Grade II Heritage listing). The delicate carvings of the ram’s heads, laurel leaves, folded ribbons and more are nearly complete but for chips at each corner, one larger than the other, both of which will need filling. There are some additional minor losses, rubbing and abrasion, none of which are unexpected with delicate plasterwork over pine.”

Dimensions (ALL Approximate):
Skirting: Height 4 ½”, width 13”, depth 3”
Fluted pilaster: Height 82 ¾” (with skirting 87 ¼”, with skirting and capital 91” total), width at bottom 10” tapering to 8 ½” at the top, depth above skirting 1 ½” tapering to 13/16” at the top
Capital: Maximum height (rams snout to top) 7”, maximum width 15”, maximum depth 5”
Weight: 34 lbs

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The skirting with crossed ribbon detailing. Gold paint on African mahogany.

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The fluting with acanthus floral motif. Gold leaf on hand-carved African mahogany.

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Detail of a ram's head with horn and decoration. Gold leaf and gold paint on plaster over pine.

I hope you enjoyed these materials. Placing this pilaster at this specific museum and providing images of the ship for the display has been very satisfying! :)

Best wishes,
Eric

edited for spelling~

#172 Bill Cotter

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 04:09 PM

Well done, Eric!

#173 magikbilly

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 07:28 PM

Well done, Eric!



Thanks, Bill!! :D


Best wishes,
Eric

#174 Bill Cotter

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 02:12 PM

A pleasant day in New York circa 1960.

First we look to the left.

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Then to the right.

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Those were the days, my friends...

#175 xl5er

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 11:13 PM

Jimmy Brealin up at 4 AM reminiscing about the Normandie.

http://www.nydailyne...ticle-1.1013509

#176 magikbilly

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 04:24 AM

Hi All,

I realized I never updated the pilaster post with photographs of the restored final display! The images posted already were the "before" photographs, taken for my condition report and research to authenticate and represent the item. Below is the archival photo which accompanied the research above; it contains additional "before" images. Following are some more recent photographs taken by the Discovery Museum Keeper of Maritime History and friend Ian Whitehead, who I have known for some six years now and who was instrumental in helping place this pilaster back "home" in the Permanent Collection - it is back where is started over a century ago. I have the provenance direct back to 1934, but the original owner wishes to remain anonymous. The Blitz was involved - a terrific story of daring rescue!

Enjoy! :)

Eric

R.M.S. Mauretania 1907-1935 Restored African Mahogany First Class Lounge Pilaster at the Segedunum Museum, Wallsend, UK

Attached File  pilaster2011.jpg   596.55KB   7 downloads
Archival photo showing these pilasters and their location in the Lounge in green; key below.

Key to illustration:
1) Detail of the capital showing a Ram’s ear, horn and laurel leaves.
2) Archival photograph showing two pilasters in situ in the Lounge on the starboard side, near the double doors leading forward to the Grand Entrance (Warren, plate 43, exact location shown with arrow in image 7).
3) The capital showing one of the two the Rams’ heads.
4) Archival detail of a Ram’s head Lounge capital (from a column).
5) Profile of the carved mahogany skirting and pilaster.
6) Detail of the pilaster carving with an archival detail of the acanthus fluting.
7) Deck plan showing the Lounge with pilaster locations highlighted in green (LLR).
8) The fluting with gilt floral motif.
9) The carved pilaster with skirting.
10) The crossed ribbon detailing.
11) The pilaster and skirting with the separate left side.

Attached File  P1.jpg   573.79KB   5 downloads
The finished display at The Segedunum Museum, Wallsend.

Attached File  P2.jpg   520.92KB   2 downloads
The Ram's head capital and pilaster newly restored and behind protective plexiglass.

Attached File  P3.jpg   694.73KB   2 downloads
Detail of the carved and gilded fluting.

Attached File  P4.jpg   963.65KB   4 downloads
Another detail of acanthus fluting rendered in gold leaf.



Attached File  MAURETANIA Pulling Away Oct 22 1907 (C) E. K. LONGO small marked.jpg   53.69KB   6 downloads

Pulling Away, 2:15 p.m. 22 October 1907 Wallsend
© Eric Keith Longo Collection, prepared and loaned for exhibit


(Museum Tag by Eric)
Pilaster, First Class Lounge, R.M.S. Mauretania 1907-1934
Louis Seize style with Acanthus fluting, Roman-crossed ribbons, and double Ram’s head capital with Britannia, by Messrs. C. H. Mellier & Co., London
Mahogany, pine, plaster, gold leaf, bronze paint

What was the Mauretania?
The Mauretania is remembered as the largest passenger liner built on the Tyne. She was launched in 1906, very close to our Segedunum Museum. She was over 240 metres long and had four large funnels. Her Captain’s Bridge was nearly as high as the upper deck of Newcastle’s High Level Bridge. She could carry 2165 passengers and 938 crew members. She also used a new type of engine, the turbine, which was invented here in Newcastle by Sir Charles Parsons.

Why is the Mauretania important?
With Parsons’ turbine engine, the Mauretania earned world fame for being the fastest liner to traverse the Atlantic to New York. On her return maiden voyage in 1907 she won the Blue Ribband, an award given to the liner that made the most rapid crossing. The Mauretania ran at 23.69 knots (over 27 miles per hour) on that first trip home, providing a great source of local pride for Tyneside, the British Cunard Line, and the entire nation. She held the Blue Ribband for 22 years.
The Mauretania, and her sister Lusitania, incorporated several features not previously offered to passengers at sea such as hydraulic barber chairs, one of the first uses of aluminum in the lift grilles, and the popular Veranda Café, which allowed passengers to take tea in an outdoor setting.
The Mauretania served in The Great War as a cruiser, hospital ship and troop transport. She returned to passenger service in 1919 and was retired in 1934. The Mauretania was scrapped in Scotland in 1935, providing needed employment at Rosyth. Much of her Lounge, the room this pilaster came from, survives and can be seen today in a pub in Bristol.


#177 magikbilly

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:25 AM

Hi All,

I ran across this image in a file and thought I'd post it as I am rarely in any photographs I show. That's me on the QM2 for a birthday party - self portrait in an elevator mirror ;)

Attached File  QM2 July 30th 2009 JM-G 80TH Bday party.jpg   376.54KB   17 downloads

Best wishes,
Eric

#178 magikbilly

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 11:54 AM

Hello All,

 

 Introducing the latest addition to my collection. An apparently little known (I have never seen it nor my friends) and unpublished photograph of both Cunard greyhounds Lusitania and Mauretania lying together in the Canada dry dock basin on October 14th, 1909. There are very few photographs of these two together - they met only twice. At this point, both have four bladed props and are a little more equivalent in speed. The Lusitania on the right was 787 feet in length and the Mauretania, left, was 790 feet. Both were 68,000 HP. In 1928 Mauretania had engine modifications that raised this to 90,000. This is a photo, not a scan - I hope to offer restored prints sometime in the future. I think it is a very impressive if not imposing image. Enjoy :D
 

 

Attached File  Cunard Monarchs © EKL 2013.jpg   519.52KB   21 downloads

The Cunard Monarchs, Anonymous, Gelatin silver print 1910 © Eric Keith Longo 2013

 

 

Enjoy :)

 

Eric

 

.



#179 waynebretl

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Posted 15 September 2013 - 06:41 PM

Wow - almost like a double exposure - thanks for posting, Eric. Not my major interest, but very impressive!



#180 magikbilly

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 12:57 AM

Hi All,

 

I wanted to share. After 14 years here is my completed Cunard R.M.S. Mauretania collection with a bit of Lusitania thrown in. The only thing not shown are pine decking bookends that hold my 1907 Shipbuilder and Engineering and the relevant signed volumes etc.. I tried very hard to collect only uncleaned examples of each - the most I have seen is the ash tray- maybe 5 total and all cleaned/destroyed (to me) with abrasives and with plaques scrubbed clean of the silk screened image on the aluminum plaque pinned to the bottom. Mine is complete. Others, like the portole dog, I have never seen another in all my collecting.

From right to left:

 

Cunard R.M.S. Mauretania 1907 Collection

 

Teak Railing thermometer – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, with plaque,  1935, original stained finish

Mahogany &Gilt Lounge molding - 1935/36 auctions/Great Tew/ Auction/Aldridge Auction/Hawley/Longo, by Messrs. W. Turner & Lord and Co., London, 1907, removed 1935, uncleaned

Pine/Gold Paint Lounge carving - 1935/36 auctions/Avery/Cole/Longo - by Messrs. W. Turner & Lord and Co., London, removed 1935, gift from Cole for authenticating & selling rest of pilaster for restoration & permanent display 2010

Teak and Manganese Bronze (prop metal) ash tray – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, engraved, with plaque, 1935, original stain/patina

Admiralty Brass porthole dog – By Thomas Utley & Company, Brassfounders of Stoneycroft, Liverpool, 1906, removed & engraved 1935, uncleaned

White metal waterline model with wooden base - C. 1914, unknown maker, pre WW1, with plaque

Brass Turbine blade – By The Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Company, Ltd., Wallsend, 1907, removed & engraved 1935, uncleaned (minor verdigris)

 

Lusitania: Steel/rust Fragment Shelter deck watertight door hand gear - Recovered 1982 Expedition Oceaneering International/E. Sauder Provenance 

 

Mauretania Pine Decking bookends – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, with plaque, 1935, original stain

 

Attached File  all.jpg   117.55KB   0 downloads

 

Hope you enjoy this taste of old world liner decor,

                                                                                Eric






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