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Maverick

scrap metal - the worlds last great ocean liners

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Hi All,

I realized I never updated the pilaster post with photographs of the restored final display! The images posted already were the "before" photographs, taken for my condition report and research to authenticate and represent the item. Below is the archival photo which accompanied the research above; it contains additional "before" images. Following are some more recent photographs taken by the Discovery Museum Keeper of Maritime History and friend Ian Whitehead, who I have known for some six years now and who was instrumental in helping place this pilaster back "home" in the Permanent Collection - it is back where is started over a century ago. I have the provenance direct back to 1934, but the original owner wishes to remain anonymous. The Blitz was involved - a terrific story of daring rescue!

Enjoy! :)

Eric

R.M.S. Mauretania 1907-1935 Restored African Mahogany First Class Lounge Pilaster at the Segedunum Museum, Wallsend, UK

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Archival photo showing these pilasters and their location in the Lounge in green; key below.

Key to illustration:

1) Detail of the capital showing a Ram’s ear, horn and laurel leaves.

2) Archival photograph showing two pilasters in situ in the Lounge on the starboard side, near the double doors leading forward to the Grand Entrance (Warren, plate 43, exact location shown with arrow in image 7).

3) The capital showing one of the two the Rams’ heads.

4) Archival detail of a Ram’s head Lounge capital (from a column).

5) Profile of the carved mahogany skirting and pilaster.

6) Detail of the pilaster carving with an archival detail of the acanthus fluting.

7) Deck plan showing the Lounge with pilaster locations highlighted in green (LLR).

8) The fluting with gilt floral motif.

9) The carved pilaster with skirting.

10) The crossed ribbon detailing.

11) The pilaster and skirting with the separate left side.

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The finished display at The Segedunum Museum, Wallsend.

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The Ram's head capital and pilaster newly restored and behind protective plexiglass.

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Detail of the carved and gilded fluting.

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Another detail of acanthus fluting rendered in gold leaf.

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Pulling Away, 2:15 p.m. 22 October 1907 Wallsend

© Eric Keith Longo Collection, prepared and loaned for exhibit

(Museum Tag by Eric)

Pilaster, First Class Lounge, R.M.S. Mauretania 1907-1934

Louis Seize style with Acanthus fluting, Roman-crossed ribbons, and double Ram’s head capital with Britannia, by Messrs. C. H. Mellier & Co., London

Mahogany, pine, plaster, gold leaf, bronze paint

What was the Mauretania?

The Mauretania is remembered as the largest passenger liner built on the Tyne. She was launched in 1906, very close to our Segedunum Museum. She was over 240 metres long and had four large funnels. Her Captain’s Bridge was nearly as high as the upper deck of Newcastle’s High Level Bridge. She could carry 2165 passengers and 938 crew members. She also used a new type of engine, the turbine, which was invented here in Newcastle by Sir Charles Parsons.

Why is the Mauretania important?

With Parsons’ turbine engine, the Mauretania earned world fame for being the fastest liner to traverse the Atlantic to New York. On her return maiden voyage in 1907 she won the Blue Ribband, an award given to the liner that made the most rapid crossing. The Mauretania ran at 23.69 knots (over 27 miles per hour) on that first trip home, providing a great source of local pride for Tyneside, the British Cunard Line, and the entire nation. She held the Blue Ribband for 22 years.

The Mauretania, and her sister Lusitania, incorporated several features not previously offered to passengers at sea such as hydraulic barber chairs, one of the first uses of aluminum in the lift grilles, and the popular Veranda Café, which allowed passengers to take tea in an outdoor setting.

The Mauretania served in The Great War as a cruiser, hospital ship and troop transport. She returned to passenger service in 1919 and was retired in 1934. The Mauretania was scrapped in Scotland in 1935, providing needed employment at Rosyth. Much of her Lounge, the room this pilaster came from, survives and can be seen today in a pub in Bristol.

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Hi All,

I ran across this image in a file and thought I'd post it as I am rarely in any photographs I show. That's me on the QM2 for a birthday party - self portrait in an elevator mirror ;)

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Best wishes,

Eric

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Hello All,

Introducing the latest addition to my collection. An apparently little known (I have never seen it nor my friends) and unpublished photograph of both Cunard greyhounds Lusitania and Mauretania lying together in the Canada dry dock basin on October 14th, 1909. There are very few photographs of these two together - they met only twice. At this point, both have four bladed props and are a little more equivalent in speed. The Lusitania on the right was 787 feet in length and the Mauretania, left, was 790 feet. Both were 68,000 HP. In 1928 Mauretania had engine modifications that raised this to 90,000. This is a photo, not a scan - I hope to offer restored prints sometime in the future. I think it is a very impressive if not imposing image. Enjoy :D

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The Cunard Monarchs, Anonymous, Gelatin silver print 1910 © Eric Keith Longo 2013

Enjoy :)

Eric

.

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Wow - almost like a double exposure - thanks for posting, Eric. Not my major interest, but very impressive!

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Hi All,

I wanted to share. After 14 years here is my completed Cunard R.M.S. Mauretania collection with a bit of Lusitania thrown in. The only thing not shown are pine decking bookends that hold my 1907 Shipbuilder and Engineering and the relevant signed volumes etc.. I tried very hard to collect only uncleaned examples of each - the most I have seen is the ash tray- maybe 5 total and all cleaned/destroyed (to me) with abrasives and with plaques scrubbed clean of the silk screened image on the aluminum plaque pinned to the bottom. Mine is complete. Others, like the portole dog, I have never seen another in all my collecting.

From right to left:

Cunard R.M.S. Mauretania 1907 Collection

Teak Railing thermometer – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, with plaque, 1935, original stained finish

Mahogany &Gilt Lounge molding - 1935/36 auctions/Great Tew/ Auction/Aldridge Auction/Hawley/Longo, by Messrs. W. Turner & Lord and Co., London, 1907, removed 1935, uncleaned

Pine/Gold Paint Lounge carving - 1935/36 auctions/Avery/Cole/Longo - by Messrs. W. Turner & Lord and Co., London, removed 1935, gift from Cole for authenticating & selling rest of pilaster for restoration & permanent display 2010

Teak and Manganese Bronze (prop metal) ash tray – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, engraved, with plaque, 1935, original stain/patina

Admiralty Brass porthole dog – By Thomas Utley & Company, Brassfounders of Stoneycroft, Liverpool, 1906, removed & engraved 1935, uncleaned

White metal waterline model with wooden base - C. 1914, unknown maker, pre WW1, with plaque

Brass Turbine blade – By The Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Company, Ltd., Wallsend, 1907, removed & engraved 1935, uncleaned (minor verdigris)

Lusitania: Steel/rust Fragment Shelter deck watertight door hand gear - Recovered 1982 Expedition Oceaneering International/E. Sauder Provenance

Mauretania Pine Decking bookends – Crafted by Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Company, Blythe, Northumberland, with plaque, 1935, original stain

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Hope you enjoy this taste of old world liner decor,

Eric

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Thanks Bill :)

For some context:

Highlighted in green is a like section of low pressure turbine blade in the rotor prior ro installation in 1906.

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Best wishes,

Eric

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This is the second Mauretania. (1939-1965) Very few Cunard liners were painted in cruising green. Mauretania was painted this way in 1963. (Pictured earlier at the Cunard pier)

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Hi,

What is the second Mauretania - I don't see a pic? The first Mauretania was painted in light green in May/June 1932 IIRC. You can read about its appearance in the NYT. It was unconfirmed until I found that snippet. Mauretania 2 was not green until 1962. Caronia was of course green before 1962 (The Green Goddess) as were a few cruise liners of the day. Mauretania (1) was not the first ship to go green either. The point was to reduce mid day glare - at least in 1932.

Best wishes,

Eric

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Hi All,

Today is 102 years since the Titanic sank - well, collided anyway. Tomorrow is the sinking anniversary technically. Anyway, I wanted to share a new photo from my Mauretania collection that shows two great Cunarder's, the Titanic's famous rescue ship the Carpathia (right), wth the Mauretania, fastest ship on the Atlantic for 22 years (left). From the caption and state of the Chelsea Piers in the Carpathia photo, that is after 1910 but before mid 1911. (White Star Lines Olympic, larger, arriving in June). I bought it as a pendant for my other cyanotype beneath - the maiden arrival of the Lusitania on Sptember 13th, 1907 at Chelsea Piers berth 54.

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The Cunarder's Mauretania and Carpathia at New York's Chelsa Piers complex berth 54 and 56, C. 1910 © EKL Images

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The R.M.S. Lusitania on her maiden arrival at New York, September 13th, 1907 © EKL Images

Best wishes,

Eric

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Millvina Dean (1912-2009), youngest and last survivor of the Titanic, signed 1924 handtined candid phtograph of the WSL Adriatic which brought her, her brother and mother (her father died) back home after the Titanc sank. Titanic's Captain Smith brought this liner Adriatic, biggest of her day, to NY on her maiden voyage in May 1907, where he made his comments about never having been in or seen a wreck, that modern shipbuilding had gone beyond that and he had an uneventful career. I select this item to be signed very carefully - everyone else has the same photos and postcards signed. This irreplaceable item, signed to me personally, was lost in the mail for a very long time and arrived one day with no postage due in a simple unmarked envelope.

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Hello Folks,

Anniversary today - 79 years. I post a very small excerpt from my unpublished (for now) manuscript and a photo from this date. By Eric Longo with assistance from Rob Kamps; additional materials, research, illustrations, restoration and presentation by Eric Longo:

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Mauretania at Tyneside: fireworks from the bridge and many small craft for this fond farewell to her birthplace. The full size file is vary sharp - I believe Captain Brown is talking to a passenger and leaning on the stern starboard railing. Her masts are cut so she will fit under the Firth of Forth Railway Bridge on the way to Metal Industries and the Naval Base at Rosyth for scrapping. One couple among the few people on this final voyage were aboard for their honeymoon on the maiden voyage in November 1907 and returned for the final trip. From her foremast flied a 22-foot Ribband - one foot for each year she held the speed record. Unpublished candid © EKL 2014

With regard to telegram received aboard the Mauretania the night before; commentary by David Walker "I have just received from the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Newcastle the following message for the Mauretania: 'You have done your work well both in commercial and war service, making maritime history. You will pass your birthplace tomorrow, and our last fond message to you is Farewell, Mauretania.' When I showed this to Captain Brown, he was obviously delighted and told me he would send a reply tomorrow which would include a message to all Tyneside.” - From The Old Lady of the Atlantic © EKL 2014

She was among the greatest of liners.
Eric

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