Jump to content
Maverick

scrap metal - the worlds last great ocean liners

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

nice slide$ Randy! Is that the Europa/Liberte looking aft? CGT is not my line (that's a pretty bad pun) but the name of the ship appears to be on the side rails.

On the topic of ocean liners, here is a photo I re-tinted from a tinted b/w photocard of the Grand Staircase aboard the R.M.S. Aquitania colored by Rocky Whiteside (who is 14 years old!! Excellent work for that age). There is a wonderful new book out called Aquitania: The Ship Beautiful by Mark Chirnside that contains 29 color restorations I did of extremely rare unpublished color slides if anyone is interested. There is also a photo from my collection in it of the Aquitania opening the Floating Drydock in Southampton. A small preview can be seen here. It can be ordered from this site as well. I was provided with extremely small scans (some just a few KB!) but did the very best I could with what there was to work with. Of course wish I could have made the scans myself. Anyway, the Staircase tint is below, under the original tint I started with - enjoy :)

aqu_int_01.jpg

The original b/w image as tinted by Rocky Whiteside

aqu_int_01.jpg.10.jpg

The Grand Staircase of the Cunard liner R.M.S. Aquitania tinted by MB

Best,

MB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eric-that is some great colorization! Did you do that from scratch, or make adjustments to the previous tint? Well done!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought folks might like to see how travel across the Atlantic could look:

liner-1.jpg

liner-2.jpg

OMG- There goes my Hydrox, right over the side!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know these are horrendous quality (possibly Ektachrome film with Kodachrome settings) but the board seems slow, and after reading the expert assessments earlier in this amazing thread I thought you fine folks might be able to wring some information out of these images, regarding the condition of the United States, the piers, or the surroundings.

A Cunard (?) color scheme 3 stack is berthed on the opppsite side of the Canadian warship. Anybody know which?

I took these photos with a Kodak Signet 40, 46 mm lens, which I had trouble focusing, developed in Aug 1968. Must have been some open house. I have more shots of the US and a small US Navy carrier tied up as well. All overexposed, unfortunately.

post-3873-1238697698_thumb.jpgpost-3873-1238697797_thumb.jpg post-3873-1238697846_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love that bow on shot of the United States.

I went to a number of those open houses in NYC. They were great. That was the first time I was ever on a submarine. Funny how one thing leads to another. Happily by the time I got out of school the diesel boats were all but gone and our boats were a tad more spacious - and sure smelled better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know these are horrendous quality (possibly Ektachrome film with Kodachrome settings) but the board seems slow, and after reading the expert assessments earlier in this amazing thread I thought you fine folks might be able to wring some information out of these images, regarding the condition of the United States, the piers, or the surroundings.

A Cunard (?) color scheme 3 stack is berthed on the opppsite side of the Canadian warship. Anybody know which?

I took these photos with a Kodak Signet 40, 46 mm lens, which I had trouble focusing, developed in Aug 1968. Must have been some open house. I have more shots of the US and a small US Navy carrier tied up as well. All overexposed, unfortunately.

post-3873-1238697698_thumb.jpgpost-3873-1238697797_thumb.jpg post-3873-1238697846_thumb.jpg

The Cunarder is the Queen Mary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happily there's still hope for your photos - here's a quick example:

nyc-navy-day.jpg

I believe that steel framework allowed them to open up the side of the piers to load the ships, but I don't know why some parts were so high.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maverick,

Thanks for identifying the QM!

Bill,

Thanks for the restoration.

I keep re-reading this topic. There's a lot of great information here. I wish some of those photos were still present to fulfill their tantalizing captions.

I'll be in the city in a week and will ask about those steel frames. By now I know to not bother asking any employee under 50.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck getting any info on them. Almost every single pier is gone now, and the few left aren't used for shipping. The very few ships that come in these days go to the passenger cruise terminal which doesn't resemble these old style piers. If you do find anything though I'd love to know myself.

My pleasure on the clean up job. I loved those open houses as a kid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You started me thinking more about those frames. I went and found some closer views of them in my files:

queen-elizabeth-1.jpg

queen-elizabeth-2.jpg

Zoomig in shows they are little more than catwalks with stairs leading to them. It looks like there are cables running up and back down, but it's not clear if they're there to tether the ship or hoist things.

I belong to a cruise liner group and will ask over there for some help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hell, I was in the business and passed written USCG exams including antiquated break bulk cargo operations and I still don't know what they are!

I'm thinking they may be in-port safety equipment for emergency evacuation, or firefighting access points.

I'm so stumped that I considered flying buttresses for support-free pier interior space, but I know those piers do have interior columns. (Now that I said that, I also know there are two skating rinks at Chelsea Piers, obviously without columns) And if someone were to suggest airship docks for when the Empire State Building was socked in, I would take a deep breath and look around for reaction before dismissing the notion.

My friend did a summer cruise aboard the USS Richard Page and they had an open house for the Bicentennial. OpSail as it was known was a spectacular event as anyone there will attest.

I'm sure they still do open houses. Ft Lauderdale has a big 4th of July Air Land Sea event with flight and amphib demonstrations. NYC has Fleet Week.

In fact the USN does a great "Tiger Cruise" for family members to observe flight ops on carriers.

http://www.tr.surfor.navy.mil/Tiger/Tiger%20Home.html

Contrast that with my eastern-block shipmate years ago who thumbed my copy of US Naval Institute's magazine "Proceedings" and shook his head in wonderment at articles clearly showing Phoenix missiles slung under an F-14 and detailing their capabilities... "You Americans have... too MUCH freedom."

I too visited a WWII sub as a kid in NYC and burned the lasting memory of how cramped it was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These photos are of Cunard/White Star Pier 54? I notice that several liner piers also had similar structures attached to the top of their sheds.

Could these be supports for fuel hoses, water hoses, electrical cables, etc., to keep them up off the pier side and out of the way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael A. Braito is Senior VP of Chelsea Piers Management Inc. He was kind enough to speak to me when I appeared at his office inquiring about the towers above the piers.

"You mean the masts?" he asked. I told him, Yeah I guess I do.

Earlier that day I visited Pier 40 and walked around the rooftop parking lot with close views of the structures. I could have climbed the rusty ladders to the catwalks if I wished, but the camera angle was better from the roof. No, really!

post-3873-1240001204_thumb.jpg

You can see the tubular mast beam is built to support great weight. Many blocks still hang from the shackles or padeyes. At one point a steel hand rail is severely bent. That takes a lot of force. Evidence that someone was having a bad day at one point and that those contraptions were actually used.

The beam runs parallel to and about a yard out from the edge of the building on Pier 40.

This tile mural of the Rotterdam lineage from the pier lobby is included for the liner fans. Note the Atomium. A WF connection!

post-3873-1240001239_thumb.jpg

A spectacular bike/rollerblade and separate walking path were recently built along the waterfront. Incredible for NYC, I passed TWO rest rooms as I followed the new landscaping north to Chelsea Piers (Piers 59-62).

post-3873-1240001357_thumb.jpg

Reinforcement plates, their attachments torched off, remain on the sides of the bays on both levels. Some are angled to brace against force about 45 degrees from vertical. If lines reeved through blocks way up high were operated from here, large belaying points would have been needed leaving such visible scars when removed. Other padeye plates remain welded to the columns.

The catwalk planks were removed leaving two parallel supports visible to the right of the main beam. Unlike Pier 40, the beam here runs directly above the plane of the building facade. A block and a length of thick cable hang from the beam.

While flirting with the Management Office receptionist, I noticed hanging on the wall a 'before' photo of Chelsea Piers. The second floor bays of the pier were openable. I did not see this in previous photos. Were the masts and blocks rigged to lift open these doors? That would make sense on Pier 40 with the beam outboard of the building, less so at Chelsea, where the lines would chafe the facade.

This photo of the wall photo came out surprisingly well.

post-3873-1240001293_thumb.jpg

Then I met Mr Braito. He said the masts were used for rigging gangway and cargo access to ships at very high tides.

I would love to find some photos of the masts in action.

Mr Braito provided an anecdote that when they drove pilings for Chelsea's driving range pier they found entire fork lifts buried in the mud. He implied a connection between such and the fact that this was the 'whisky pier', but I've never known sailors to be the kind to take more than the rare social drink (!)

We spoke about how familial connections and multiple generations of pierside employees allow for the passing down of great historical tidbits. Then he started looking at his watch.

I will invite Mr Braito to visit PTU. Hopefully he will stop by and post us the benefit of his knowledge and connections. Otherwise I will keep barging into his office.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill,

You're not the only one who likes bow shots.

http://worldshipny.com/bows.htm

http://worldshipny.com/bows2.htm

Mike,

I've seen a lot of photos but still can't find those masts in use. Here're some with gangways pushing out of upper pier levels and some beautiful shots of the Normandie

http://worldshipny.com/normandieaug39.html

I'll crash The Port of NY World Ship Society meeting next Friday and see if they have any.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the links. There are some good ones there indeed.

Here's a slide I have showing some of the gangways for the SS United States in 1959. In the full-size version you can see some of the lines arching upwards to the metal work.

ss-united-states-7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All,

I also love these piers...and bow shots - I have some great earlier photographs and slides of these things - two of which are below:

CheleaPiersMauretania12.22.7.09.jpg

R.M.S. Mauretania at what will be Pier 54 with the original White Star Line shed an the Department of Docks and Ferries shed on the exttreme right, on her second voyage to New York, December 22, 1907 - a rare photograph taken the day before a serious accident you can read an illustrated description of by me here: The R.M.S. Mauretania sinks the Alice P. Rogers December 23, 1907© EKL Image Collection

An early photograph of the new Chelsea Piers, starting with WSL 61 and stetching back to the Cunard Piers, C. 1909

© EKL Image Collecion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I'd share a little newly discovered family history with you. In 1938, my Grandfather, grandmother, father and uncle went for a european tour. Courtesy of ancestry.com, here's the page from the manifest of the SS Quenn Mary. Passengers 6-9 are my family.

post-3701-1240505641_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great find. Did you know about the trip before or just come across it?

The trip itself is an old family story, I didn't know they went on the Queen Mary until a week ago when the manifest popped up on Ancestry.com.

There was another document that showed the ship my grandfather came over on when he first came to the US. That's the ship I'd like to see a picture of; The Amsterdam. All I know about it is that theUC-49 sunk on the 24.Feb.1918 the british steamship "Amsterdam". The ship wasis built 1877 and had 806 GRT. prior to 1903 the name was "Avon". Builder was Cunliffe & Dunlop at Inch Yard. The ship was torpedoed in a convoy. The commander of the sub was Hans Kückenthal.

I also found this on a message board:The AMSTERDAM (Official No.78569) was an iron-hulled 806-ton British steam cargo vessel that measured: 66.75m by length, an 8.83m-beam and a 4.57m-draught.

Cunliffe & Dunlop, at Inch Yard, Port Glasgow built and completed her as Yard No.129 in February 1878; she was launched as the AVON in December 1877 for W. Sloan & Co., Glasgow. The single iron propeller was powered by a 2-cylinder compound steam engine that used one boiler. The shipbuilders manufactured the machinery.

In 1903, she was renamed AMSTERDAM by James Rankine & Son Ltd., who also owned her at the time of loss.

Final voyage:

On 24 February 1918, the Kaiserliche Marine submarine UC 49, commanded by Oblt.z.S. Hans Kükenthal, torpedoed and sunk the SS AMSTERDAM without any warning, 6-miles SE by E of Coquet light (according to Lloyd’s War Losses WWI). She was on a voyage from Leith to Rotterdam, carrying 87 passengers and a general cargo, including coal, but only four of the passengers and crew were lost. The that were lost, were:

Craig, Norman Scott 24yrs Wireless Operator

Daly, Peter 18yrs Cabin Boy

McGregor, David Arthur 26yrs Second Engineer

McMillan, Alexander 34yrs Mate

There is a website with a photo of The Amsterdam here.

post-3701-1240516792_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just came across this topic on ocean liners!

I'm another huge ocean liner enthusiast!!!

I love all the photos in this topic! Especially those of the United States!

My top 3 favorite ocean liners - Olympic, United States, Queen Mary. the Titanic is in a group of it's own, being the first ship to peak my interest in the third grade!

Anyway, I posted here with some recent info on the Ex- Indepedence, now called SS Platinum II.

Here's the link:http://www.ssmaritime.com/newsupdates.htm

I always hold out some hope that the few remaining ocean liners will somehow be saved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A family friend of ours sailed aboard the United States in 1967, and she ended up giving me her collection of memorabilia from the voyage, which I'm pleased to share here (the lot also included a spoon and napkin, and a complete bound booklet listing all Tourist Class passengers)

Here's a menu.

post-161-126186505621_thumb.jpg

post-161-126186512838_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×