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Chmnofbrd

Lefrak City in 1964

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I notice the LeFrak City still exists today (I found a web site) and that there are 5,000 apt. units which were built between 1960-1969. That web site indicates that the area, on the edge of the Park, is plagued by crime and drug related problems. Unfortunately, much more than rental costs have changed since 1964, I suspect.

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I notice the LeFrak City still exists today (I found a web site) and that there are 5,000 apt. units which were built between 1960-1969. That web site indicates that the area, on the edge of the Park, is plagued by crime and drug related problems. Unfortunately, much more than rental costs have changed since 1964, I suspect.

Oh you got that right !!!

You think your in foreign country dont go near at night. Its just a shame.

Some of them old blocks with wooded houses were beautyful

-Joe

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What a price for a 4 room apt with 2 baths! Have things changed since then.

Multiply the figures in the ad (assuming it is from 1964) by 6.04 to convert the prices to 2005 dollars. That makes the 4-room, 2 bath apartment $1,232. I don't know the current price of apartments in Queens but my guess is that it is still pretty decent, assuming it is a real price rather than a "bait and switch" come-on.

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WOW..how funny is this? I just joined yesterday and I was thinking hard to come up with a name for myself ( my daughter is "specialbunny" and I promised NOT to be something too embarrassing). Anyhow when I was a kid we moved from Boston to Queens so my dad could start his job in NYC..and we moved to Lefrak, the "first" section. We lived there during the big black out too! Since my parents were young and new to NY, their friends came from Massachussetts to visit, and flop at our apartment to come see the WF! I was 6-7yrs old, my sister was 2-3..SOO as a kindness to my parents often their friends would take me along w/ them to the fair to give my mom a break. So i got to visit many times.

We moved to a real house a few years later in Jamaica Estates as soon as my dad started making more money, and Lefrak started to quickly turn to a troubled area, low income, gang trouble, drugs, violence and crime. For years I didn't even admit that we had once lived there because it had such a bad rep. But i do remember it fondly for the years we lived ther. And MAN was it awesome to trick or treat by elevator all the way up to the 18th floor..BAGS AND BAGS of goodies. We had a pool just downstairs, and playgrounds peppered thru the different "sections".

Anyway I'm glad to be here and its funny that i found this topic AFTER i came up with my new user name.

nancy

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Welcome to PTU Nancy! What is your favorite remembrance of the World's Fair?

Any escapades or incidents to report? What is the favorite souvenir that you brought home?

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Marc gave me a heads up a while back that my mom had registered here too (but she seldom checks in).

So we can have a tag-team match one of these days.

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Darn, there goes the beehive hairdo!

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Same fate happened to Co-Op City. It was built after the fair on the site of the defunct Freedomland in the Bronx. I believe around 1970. Started out nice, I had cousins living there. We visited when I must have been 12 years old? I really can't remember what age or year but I was young. My cousins about the same age took me on their daily trek through the stairwells and other places where we met some of the 'gangs' in their early incarnation. In the front of the scene it was still nice, but the seeds were planted behind the scenes early on. I suppose a few years later our parents would not have let us explore the way we did.

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Same fate happened to Co-Op City. It was built after the fair on the site of the defunct Freedomland in the Bronx. I believe around 1970. Started out nice, I had cousins living there. We visited when I must have been 12 years old? I really can't remember what age or year but I was young. My cousins about the same age took me on their daily trek through the stairwells and other places where we met some of the 'gangs' in their early incarnation. In the front of the scene it was still nice, but the seeds were planted behind the scenes early on. I suppose a few years later our parents would not have let us explore the way we did.

My grandparents lived in Westchester, so we'd travel from Queens to visit them , I remember Thanksgiving because generally the traffic was at a stand still for hours. I remember the stories we'd heard re: CO-OP city were so scary and dark, that when the car would be in traffic within sight of COC, I'd be scared we'd see bodies being thrown out windows! That same kind of vibe went out regarding Lefrak City.

When I was in Lefrak, we were allowed to ride the elevator as soon as we were tall enough to hit the button for the 17th flr where we lived. And we'd walk the steps up and down as well. We travelled from section to section to use the different playgrounds. We'd NEVER let kids do that today! I know I tell my girls all the time that things were different back then when they scowl at me because they were not allowed the freedom to roam.

Nancy

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Welcome, Nancy!

I was thinking about the Blackout of 1965 just the other day. I believe that November 9 was the 40th anniversary of that event. As I recall, it was an event that triggered very little social unrest--no looting or other significant problems; people actually worked together and cooperated in elevators, trains, hotels etc. I was in the Syracuse area and we were hit as well. It extended from north of Montreal to Baltimore, I believe. Supposedly, nine months later, there was a rather significant increase in the number of births in the Blackout area as well.

As regards Lefrak City, Co-op City etc: I recall that in the 1980's Mayor Byrne of Chicago moved to a massive housing complex known as Cabrini Green in order to indicate that the news stories of violence and drugs etc. should not deter anybody from living there. I don't think her experiment lasted too long and by the 1990's Chicago demolished Cabrini Green which was one of the largest apartment complexes in the nation.

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Welcome, Nancy!

I was thinking about the Blackout of 1965 just the other day. I believe that November 9 was the 40th anniversary of that event. As I recall, it was an event that triggered very little social unrest--no looting or other significant problems; people actually worked together and cooperated in elevators, trains, hotels etc. I was in the Syracuse area and we were hit as well. It extended from north of Montreal to Baltimore, I believe. Supposedly, nine months later, there was a rather significant increase in the number of births in the Blackout area as well.

As regards Lefrak City, Co-op City etc: I recall that in the 1980's Mayor Byrne of Chicago moved to a massive housing complex known as Cabrini Green in order to indicate that the news stories of violence and drugs etc. should not deter anybody from living there. I don't think her experiment lasted too long and by the 1990's Chicago demolished Cabrini Green which was one of the largest apartment complexes in the nation.

Thanks! Nice to be here

I remember the black out of 65 well..we lived on the 17th floor in lefrak, my friend in another building on the 18th!! we were playing when the lights went out..elevators down, everything! we were at friends house so we had to go up and down all those flights..i remember as a kid it was kinda exciting, lots of stories..people up and down the steps..flashlights..we kinda looked at it as an adventure..i think i went up and down those steps 1/2 dozen times!! i'd kill for that energy/stamina today!! hahahahaha. And of course the innocence..no longer are we free to let our kids roam and run around..ah well

nancy

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You are absolutely correct about the loss of innocence, Nancy. We did have a more open world back then. Just the thought of letting kids run free today gives me a chill. Have we really changed that much (and for the worse) or did all of the evil exist back than and we were just unaware?

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You are absolutely correct about the loss of innocence, Nancy. We did have a more open world back then. Just the thought of letting kids run free today gives me a chill. Have we really changed that much (and for the worse) or did all of the evil exist back than and we were just unaware?

Well Jim, I think it is a little of both, I remember bad things happening when I was a kid..the Long Island Post was filled with stories of the Alice Crimmins murder (she killed her own two kids), but there was an innocence too. And I think now that we have 24 hour news, we see so much more of these horrendus stories, and I do believe there is an element of copy-cat that occurs. Gives some people ideas or the excuse to act out on impulses. I'm the mother of twin teen-aged daughters, the fears I have are real and can be paralyzing- but its finding a happy medium btwn locking them in the basement to protect them or letting them just do whatever they want that is the hardest part of parenting. Its hard to explain to them sometimes that I really DO trust them, but its the world that you can't trust and they don't have the experience yet to understand. Things like this Aruba disapperance ends up being a good teaching moment to explain to them why its important to travel w/ a partner, not to go off with strangers etc..but yet its still not reality to them I am sure. Its easy for any of us to be detached from things that are outside of our immediate sight. And I think their brains are still wired to believe they are impervious to those realities. However,the excitement and the energy of these teenagers, and the possibilities I've seen visitng the college campuses makes me eager to watch them soar!! But we'll always fear someone is lurking there waiting to clip their wings. Ugh!

well on that cheerful note I will get back to work..

Nancy

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Wasn't 1964 the year Kitty Genovese was murdered in NY as her neighbors looked on from their apartment windows (in Brooklyn)? Many cite this as a defining moment when Americans began to lose their innocence and crime became more of a daily threat. Also, you are correct as to how the cable news channels approach such stories of violence. The use of graphics, talking heads, music, dramatic "breaking news" headlines, focus on lurid details--all of this puts "news" into the realm of entertainment. Many gravitate to those violent and lurid stories on television much as the Romans sought the same in their arenas. I am sorry, for example, for the loss of that unfortunate girl in Aruba, yet that story receives tons of daily air time (even today) and by comparison, most Americans are pitifully uninformed about our situation in Iraq.

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Kitty Genovese murder occured in Kew Gardens Queens.Being the father of two college age kids I understand completly what Nacny is saying.I just hope my kids become worldly in their knowledge before they have to face the world-SonnyT.

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