Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Chmnofbrd

The NBC Opening Night Broadcast

Recommended Posts

Here is the ad from the star studded opening night show. The B&W version I have is only 45 minutes long and seems to be a version that may have been edited for Armed Forces Television or for telecasting overseas. Has anyone ever heard if the color full length copy exists?

<a href=" NBCFairsOpeningNight.jpg" target="_blank">http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a13/Chmno...peningNight.jpg</a>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not likely, even though entertainment specials were usually the only programs NBC would sometimes keep in the original broadcast format. When MSNBC did the "Time And Again" show on World's Fairs and used clips from that special, they used only the B/W kinescope broadcast and they were usually good at using the best quality version of whatever happened to exist in their archives for those shows.

So much television history from the early 60s sadly lost to us forever or preserved only in an inferior format.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at what NBC did erasing the first ten years of The Tonight Show to reuse the video tapes. It's funny that ratty old Kinescopes from 1950 could survive because you could not re-use 16mm prints and shows from the 60's are gone. Fortunately even though they are B&W Kinescopes about two dozen 1960's Tonight Shows just turned up at an Armed Forces Television storage facility.

The same thing goes for all of the 60's episodes of Merv Griffin. He actually did a 90 minute show with Robert Frost in 1961 that I believe might have been his only TV interview. Merv also talked one night about when he was doing his late night show in 1965 on CBS from NY that Shelly Winters and Tallulah Bankhead came by "three sheets to the wind" from a benefit at the Waldorf Astoria. They did an unrehearsed version of Hard Hearted Hannah that brought the house down. Judy Garlands last American TV performance was Christmas Eve 1968 when she guest hosted for Merv and thats gone too. How sad a part of our recent entertainment history was just wiped away for no reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some more from the sad tally of what's been lost to us as far as 1960s television goes:

-All Jack Paar and Johnny Carson Tonight Shows (save the aforementioend kinescopes usually saved by Armed Forces TV) The oldest color tape clip of a Carson show I have is Judy Garland's only two appearances ever on Carson from 1968, the oldest complete show in color I have is the Tiny Tim wedding show from December 1969. (Incidentally, the Tonight Show from the day the Fair opened is one of the few kinescopes that does survive)

-All World Series telecasts in original broadcast tape format except for Games 3, 4 and 5 of the 69 World Series. (Kinescopes only exist for the 65 and 68 World Series) If that isn't bad enough, consider this. There is not ONE complete major league baseball regular season telecast prior to 1969 known to exist in any format of some thousands upon thousands of broadcasts up to 1969.

-Almost all evening newscasts for this decade except for those Vanderbilt News Archives started recording in August 1968 on a daily basis.

-All daytime game shows of this era (an exception being Password from 1966-67).

-The first two Super Bowl telecasts (and the first one was aired on both NBC and CBS!) and other famous NFL games like the "Ice Bowl" which inspired the title of a book "Instant Replay" because the key play was shown so many times over and over in the days following but the game and that play is now gone.

Sadly, the mindset of those at the networks was to not appreciate the history these tapes provided and they were more interested in saving costs by recycling tapes they figured could never be repeated again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The telecast of the 1964 World Series (Yankees-Cardinals) is the first vivid memory I have of a World Series. I remember racing home from school to watch it on our portable Sears black & white TV.

At the time I could name the entire starting lineup of the Yankees including their starting pitching rotation (I can still name most of them!), and the series showcased brother versus brother- Clete Boyer versus Ken Boyer. The Cardinals featured a very young hotshot pitcher named Bob Gibson.

Another oddity- in between the '64 and '65 seasons the managers of the two teams- Ralph Houk and Johnny Keane- basically traded jobs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, not quite. Yogi Berra who managed the Yankees that year got fired the day after the WS and replaced by Cardinals manager Keane who had quit the team the same day. As it turned out, earlier in the season, Keane had secretly struck a deal with Houk, Yankees GM at the time, to take over the Yankees in 65 at a time when it looked like both of their teams were out of the pennant race. Neither of them expected that both of their teams would rally to face each other in the WS but they still went ahead with their scheme after the WS!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All right here's one for you Eric. I'd doin' this off the top of my head-

'64 Yankees-

around the infield I recall it being Joe Pepitone, Tony Kubek, Bobby Richardson and Clete Boyer.

Catcher was Elston Howard.

Pitchers included Mel Stottlemeyer and Whitey Ford. And Pete somebody, and they had one black pitcher- I forget his name.

The outfield of course was handled by Roger Maris in right and Mickey Mantle in center. But who was the left fielder?

The name Tom Tresh comes to mind, but I'm picturing Tresh as an infielder and I've already got those covered. Was Tom Tresh the left fielder?

Roger Maris was my favorite player when I was a kid, and Bobby Richardson was #2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are correct on all the names you mention and the other pitchers were Pete Mikkelsen, who was basically the closest the team had to a relief ace that year (though not too effectively since he gave up the game winning homer to Tim McCarver in the 5th game), Al Downing (the team's black starter) and Jim Bouton who won Games 3 and 6.

Tom Tresh began his career as a shortstop when he came up in 62 but switched the outfield that first year and was indeed the leftfielder.

Tony Kubek, normally the regular shortstop missed the entire WS that year because of back problems so Phil Linz, a reserve infielder who later owned a New York nightclub, played short during that WS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Al Downing- that's right- and how could I forget Jim "Ball Four" Bouton?

I think besides his time with the Yankees, Al Downing had quite a career with the Dodgers, including the "honor" of serving up the pitch that Hank Aaron knocked over the fence in Atlanta for home run #715- breaking Babe Ruth's record. In spite of that footnote to history, Al went on to a successful post baseball career in broadcasting (like Kubek and McCarver) . Downing is still in the Dodgers broadcast booth- promoted this year to the primary radio team, working with Vin Scully, Steve Lyons and Rick Monday.

I forgot about Tim McCarver being the Cardinals' catcher too.

Thanks Eric for the trip down nostalgia lane!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My pleasure! The rich history of the game is always fun to go through even when the current season isn't offering much to cheer about (for a Yankees fan like me at least).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Yankees' longtime rival Dodgers are a sorry excuse for a team this year too (like the Lakers!) so it's not a good year to follow baseball.

(unless you're a Red Sox fan, or a Mets fan, etc.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the Opening Day Picture, The NBC Truck: Could this be the day before since opening day was an overcast rainy day..Hey I was not even born yet, but the small things you learn on this site!!

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could be- the slide was processed in April '64 so the date is not certain. For that matter, it could be the day after opening day...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That picture shows a monochrome camera, so it was not part of the "color spectacular".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great deduction, Whatsup! Good catch on that B&W camera, too, Wayne.

We all missed that point... and we've seen that photo before.

Welcome to PTU!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the key to identifying this as a B&W camera?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It's the common form factor for B&W image orthicon cameras - only big enough for one pickup tube. The color cameras were much bulkier and heavier, having three pickup tubes - see

http://www.nywf64.com/rca04.shtml

and

http://www.kingoftheroad.net/colorTV/myTK41_2.html

and

http://www.oldradio.com/archives/hardware/TV/rca-1964wf.jpg

and

http://www.oldradio.com/archives/hardware/...-tk41(wgn2).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Wayne, I see 2 power cords going to the lens. Assuming it's a zoom lens, are they for power zoom and power focus? Was the iris adjustable on these cameras? Or did they even have them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Wayne, I see 2 power cords going to the lens. Assuming it's a zoom lens, are they for power zoom and power focus? Was the iris adjustable on these cameras? Or did they even have them?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Mike, I believe the two cables are focus and zoom - and they are mechanical, not electrical. Camera operators ("cameramen" at the time) have been known to complain about electrical servos as not having the "feel" of mechanical cables; also, I don't know if lenses with electrical servos were available in 1964.

The camera did have an iris, which would be electrically controlled from back at the video engineer's station. Actually, I'm not certain whether the exposure control was an iris opening or a variable neutral-density wheel - I will have to do some research when I get back home. It seems to me a neutral density wheel would have advantages in a camera using multiple lenses on a turret. Film chains did use a neutral density wheel, I am sure. In later color cameras, the exposure control is/was an iris in the zoom lense. I'm pretty sure that this vintage zoom lens did not have a remotely controlled iris, and of course turreted lenses did not have remote controlled irises, so the exposure control had to be part of the camera head.

The very last generations of lenses for tube cameras were designed to match the head including signaling their settings to a lookup table of characteristics such as chromatic abberation, barrel distortion, etc., which could all be compensated by slightly changing the scanning waveforms on the three pickup tubes. Of course, this sophisticated compensation only became possible with the advent of microcontrollers. Now, CCD sensors are used, which cannot change their geometry, so any compensation of this type would take even more sophisticated video processing.

I may have to consult Chuck Pharis to get the answers:

http://www.pharis-video.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI All,

Is this the show that was hosted by Edwin Newman. I remember a color show as a kid where reporter Edwin Newman was showing off the different pavilions. One thing that stands out is that he actually was allowed into the Clairol Carousel of Color. Any ideas folks.

Thanks

Ed Kelerchian (Born and raised in Queens, Now in Fort Worth Texas)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to PTU Ed! I can check my copy of the video tonight, but I'm sure somebody else will have the answer before then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is somebody who says he has an 8mm color movie he made by pointing it at an early color TV set broadcasting from the World's Fair. Basically a color kinescope.

I wonder if we could get him to transfer it to DVD for us?

<a href="http://home.att.net/~pldexnis/potpourri1/lastpage4.html" target="_blank">http://home.att.net/~pldexnis/potpourri1/lastpage4.html</a>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to PTU Ed!  I can check my copy of the video tonight, but I'm sure somebody else will have the answer before then.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Randy,

Tell us more about the video! Is it a color copy? Can you make copies for me/us?

-Wayne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×