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Greyhound Escorter

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If what is seen in the second photo is just the steering column and not some kind of bag hanging there, did the Escorter have a tilt steering wheel?

Steering1.jpg

On the top of the steering column was there some kind of decorative emblem, or maybe something mechanical like a compass?

Steering2.jpg

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In photo # 1 of this series, what is that control above the

Unisphere decal? Is that attached to the fare meter flag?

Does it swing left and right to activate the fare calculation?

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It's too bad this zoom-in of a cropped tiny area on the slide ends up grainy.

Mike Kraus, what resolution is your max to scan your slide? If Bill Cotter or I can do any better at 4000 dpi (we have identical Nikon film scanners) let us know.

Might this be an ignition key sticking out?

Did Escorters have an ignition key?

Steering3.jpg

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That bracket may have been for a horizontally mounted fire extingusher, held in place by a clip that would be snapped open to release the extingusher. We have something very much like that in our plane.

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Thanks guys for the responses.

There was no emblem in the center of the steering wheel. Just a rubber cover over the horn button.

The Escorter did not have a tilt steering column. It was held in place with a "U" bracket which was attached to another bracket which was attached to the frame.

The control above the Unisphere decal is the Rockwell taxi meter flag which is attached to the lever of the meter which is mounted face up beneath the plexiglass. The handle does move to reset and then engage the meter.

The Escorter did have a Cole-Hersee key ignition switch, just to the left of the larger gauge.

The other two gauges (in addition to the one I'm trying to identify) were a 50-0-50 amp gauge and a fuel gauge. Both work, but should be replaced with NOS units. I've looked for a long time at the Stewart Warner gauges, but the originals were not Stewart Warner’s and I didn't want to settle for anything but original parts. I just recently discovered that they were actually King Seeley gauges, have found a replacement NOS fuel gauge and will continue to look for the amp gauge.

The larger gauge hole is 3" in diameter and has 3 small gauge mounting holes surrounding it. I've thought for a long time that this opening had to have held a speedometer. But then why would this slow moving, off the road vehicle need a speedometer ? Were there speed limits on the fairgrounds ? It's more likely that this opening held an hour meter to identify service intervals and to match with money collected from fares. Just need a photo to confirm. Definitely not a tachometer as the little 2 cylinder engine runs at a constant speed only to power the hydraulic pump which, in turn, powers the hydraulic wheel motors which are engaged by the hydraulic accelerator pedal.

That bracket is a real a mystery !!! Maybe the telling photo will turn up…..

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Maybe not a gauge at all !! Could this opening have held a 3" speaker for the horn ?

Notice in Randy's photo how whatever it is seems to round out a bit from the dash like maybe a speaker cover might do. And, just to the lower left of this thing is a fuse holder. So whatever it is would need to be fused. What do you think ?

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Do you mean a speaker pointed at the driver? Why would they do that?

One would think that the speaker would be mounted in the front grille, or hidden behind the front bumper, something like that.

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Exactly my thoughts. It definatley suggests a speaker cover and I could understand a two way radio speaker in that position.

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Bill. First I've heard that the Escorter driver gave guided tours over a speaker.

There are no unaccounted for holes in the frame where a speaker could be mounted, just this 3" hole in the dash and the "mystery bracket".

Escorter%20Dash.JPG

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The 3 small holes surrounding the 3"diameter hole offer a clue as to what may have been mounted in the dash.Could a tachometer have been mounted there?

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Here's a pre-restoration photo of the Escorter dash. It shows the outline of what was in the 3" hole. Whatever it was had been removed and covered over with a square aluminum cover, the outline of which is also visible (and it had been there for a LONG time).

I read somewhere on this forum that the Escorter horns were removed early on. Could the speaker have been removed at the same time and the hole covered over ?

If it was a gauge of somekind, I wonder why it would have been removed either at or even after the fair while everything else was left intact ?

Pre-Restoration%20Dash.jpg

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Hey, you did a nice job cleaning up that fiberglass, Flatlander!

You say the vehicle is driven by hydraulic motors?

Might the hole be a hydraulic pressure gauge? Or a control?

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Two thoughts...

1. Maybe the "rectangular plate" around the hole was an escutcheon around whatever was in the hole like the chrome escutcheon surrounding a shower hot/cold valve, and not an afterthought. It may have had wording of some kind printed below and to the right of the 3" device in the hole.

2. I doubt the "guided tour" speaker would have faced the driver... and I also agree that the horn would have faced forward or down, too. I can't remember... do speakers typically mount with three bolts or four?

Is there any sign of a speaker mounted in the roof facing down toward the passengers?

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It's my understanding that the Escorters were basically used as a taxi service, not a guided tour service. I haven't seen any photos of drivers talking into a microphone (which I HAVE seen on glide-a-ride drivers- the microphone was a device that hung around their neck and project out in front of their mouth).

But I HAVE seen Escorter drivers waiting outside pavilions, presumably for their passenger to come back out from their visit.

Being a taxi it would make sense for them to do what taxis do when they don't have a fare-

#1- cruise the fairgrounds and watch for somebody to flag them down when they want a ride

#2- wait outside the big pavilions for anybody who might want to pay for a ride

#3- listen to their radio for their dispatcher to send them to pick up somebody

I'm at work and don't have access to one of my endless copies of those Greyhound 'How to see the New York World's Fair' guides in orange (1964) or blue (1965). Can anybody check and see if the orange (1964) guide pamphlet included a phone number to call to be picked up by an Escorter? If phone-for-a-ride service existed, then one would think a central dispatcher would had to have been able to assign the job to a specific driver who was 'available'. Besides running outside the Greyhound buildng and handing a piece of paper to the first driver in a line of Escorters, it would make more sense to have a dispatcher radio. And in that case, the two-way radio's on-board speaker would logically need to face the driver, and the driver would probably have a hang-on-the-hook microphone to acknowledge the assignment.

In those photos, might any of those things we see be a small mike hanging on a hook?

It looks like this 3" hole was also placed just to the right of the steering column, right next to the ignition key switch. Designers usually do that when there is something mechanical that the driver needs to be able to manipulate, and they cater to the majority of the population who are right-handers. That's why I suspect that this is not a gauge but something with knobs to adust or something to pick up, like a mike.

Gauges are usually installed more centered or elsewhere, as long as they are in the line of sight of the driver.

(it makes sense that the engine-related gauges are to the left, near the engine compartment, along with the Choke.)

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Also, look at the pictures of these drivers. Having a speedometer face their knees is not very practical. I expect that the engines may have had a 'governor' on them, so speed wasn't really an issue.

Does your two-stroker have a governor on it Flatlander?

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Another view on a postcard. Too bad we don't have a high res of this one...

B101.jpg

And this one

http://www.arthurfreelanceservices.net/images/june%202003%20pg%208.pdf

Contact Richard Spivey, he installed something in that 3" hole.

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Doug…The solid aluminum plate (actually some kind of placard holder) was obviously installed after whatever was located in the 3” hole was removed. Also, many smaller speakers were mounted via 3 vs. 4 screws. There are no mounting locations on either the canopy or in the front of the passenger compartment (down by their feet) where a speaker could have been located.

Randy…The idea that the Escorters might have had a dispatch radio has been talked about on this forum in the past and while it would make sense that they would, there have been no photos taken at the fair that can confirm whether they did or didn’t. I tend to think they didn’t, as there are no mounting locations (holes in either the frame or body) to support a radio. I haven’t completely dismissed the idea, though, as we still don’t know what the purpose of that bracket on the firewall (to the driver’s right) was for. Then there was that small bracket that was located on the top of the canopy near the right front corner that could have held a radio antenna. But, this would have required a wire to run along and down the right canopy strut to the drivers compartment and there are no signs of such a wire in any photo I’ve seen.

The only purpose for the engine in the Escorter is to power the hydraulic pump. As such, it runs at a constant speed There is no throttle to increase or decrease engine power. The accelerator pedal is connected to a hydraulic actuator which sends pressure to the two hydraulic motors located at each front wheel. The hand lever that you can see (particularly in Randy’s side view photo) is used to disengage the actuator by pushing up on the accelerator pedal from the underneath side.

Mitch…I’ve spoken with Spivey and he didn’t know what went there either. He filled the hole with a speedometer out of an old bus.

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Silly of me to think you hadn't checked in with Spivey about this 3" hole. My apologies, its been a long week...to me it looks like a hole for a guage not a speaker. To me, speakers always had for mounting holes. Hydrolic pressure could be a good guess.

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There looks to be a good photo in Bill Cotter's series. I do not have this disk.

Check CD 24, Set 127, photo # 020. I think theres a partial shot of this guage.

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