Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Eric Paddon

West Virginia

Recommended Posts

Love the WV piece, Bill.

Here's one for you to chase down, Hood:

Who won the free house and "Mountain Top", and is the house still there?

(From the West Virginia feature at NYWF64.com)

WIN A MOUNTAIN TOP

One feature certain to wax enthusiasm among visitors will be the chance to win a 5-acre mountaintop complete with a 1,024-square foot chalet.

 

The property and chalet are a gift of Charles Moore of Thornbottom Enterprises, Wardensville, West Virginia.

 

Near the closing of the Fair in '65 a drawing will be held and the name of the winner of this mountain retreat announced. The chalet is a two-bedroom structure and includes an all-electric kitchen, a living room with fireplace and a 12-foot deck.

We want to see recent photos, Bruce!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I emailed a local realtor in Wardensville, West Virginia. Ms. Bowman said she is not familiar with the property, however she will look into it and will let me know what she uncovers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lived in Morgantown, WV for three years before moving to Ohio so I am somewhat familiar with the geography of the state. The location of the chalet should be outstanding. It is in the area of a huge national forest between the Shenandoah and Blue Ridge Mountains in the Eastern Panhandle. There isn't too much around there in the way of "civilization" but the natural beauty of the area will knock your eyes out.

I really envy the lucky dog who won it.

-John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for getting the ball rolling, Hood.

Don't you always wonder if anybody ever really wins stuff like this house?

This would really be fun to find out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who wants to tackle the race horse? biggrin.gif

This was an interesting feature to put together. West Virginia really went all-out for the Fair. Their pavilion was sponsored by the State and the State Dept. of Commerce. I think they really planned to make an impact on the "70-100 million" visitors that they'd been told would be coming to the Fair. One has to wonder if they were disappointed -- not only in the less-than-projected attendance but also in the fact that so many visitors were tied up in the Industrial Area and Transportation Area and probably never ventured over to that area of the Fairgrounds to see what they had to offer. Their next-door-neighbor was Illinois and perhaps they benefited from the overflow crows from "Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln." At any rate, they gave a lot of thought to their exhibit and I hope they got their money's worth.

On Robert Moses being given "Constitutional immunity from arrest" in WV ... wonder if the thought crossed his mind to take some of his political enemies on a WV "fishing trip?" ... one from which they'd never return?

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that because they went for JFK in a crucial early primary in 1960, West Virginia was the beneficiary of massive federal aid after Kennedy became president. That might explain how their state chamber of commerce was able to fund such a nice pavilion.

BTW, for those who have Ray Dashner's Vault II, there are a couple of incredible pictures of the West Virginia pavilion, ones that I had not seen before. One is an exterior shot of the front of the pavilion showing what I think must have been a model of the giveway house (E:VAULT II v2.04 FOLDERNYWF3 PHOTO ALBUMNYWF ALBUM 3 002.jpg). The other is an exterior of the back of the pavilion showing what appears to be a small outdoor cafe or eating area (E:VAULT II v2.04 FOLDERNYWF1 PHOTO ALBUMWEST VIRGINIA.jpg).

Bill, could you possibly post these? Thanks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bradd Schiffman:

I think that because they went for JFK in a crucial early primary in 1960, West Virginia was the beneficiary of massive federal aid after Kennedy became president. That might explain how their state chamber of commerce was able to fund such a nice pavilion.<HR></blockquote>

......not to mention a very powerful senator, Robert Byrd (?). The W.V. Turnpike is unbelievable! Federal money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRADD,

THE WEST VIRGINIA PAVILION PICTURES ARE NOW POSTED IN "NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965" ALBUM. CLICK HERE:

<a href="http://community.webshots.com/user/draydar" target="_blank">http://community.webshots.com/user/draydar</a>

[This message has been edited by Ray in Pasadena (edited 08-03-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed that all of the Luminaires in the West Virginia/ Singer Bowl area are of the "White-Yellow-Orange" flavor.

You'll notice that these same colored lamps line both sides of the prominade for quite a distance.

I wonder the were color coded by street, rather than by "area".

Randy, while you're examining Bills slides in such a detailed manner, is it possible to also start building a layout of the lights?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug,

A few months ago I started looking at the lights in detail to see if I could decode any pattern related to size, shape, color, and proximity to some landmark.

I have been corresponding with Gary Holmes as he is the only one I know of that has one of these in his possesion. Gary has been most helpful in providing physical dimensions.

Over the past weeks I have created some basic shapes based on photos offered from the many internet and private collection sources. I was hoping to do a feature on this for Bill's web site if I could gather enough facts.

So far I have determined 23 unique configurations. I am sure there are more!

I have ranked them based on the number of cubes which make up the lamp assembly. I always include the center cube-post mount in all counts.

The lamps start at 5 cubes and progress through 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 cubes. The largest fixture tops out at a whopping 17 cubes.

As to color, I am begininng to see some sort of pattern, but need more photos of specific areas to make out the code depending on the area. For example, at NY State Building and in the state area, the code seems to be red, white and blue.

Over by the main entrance and Gotham Plaza, that code is white, orange, and blue.

Space Park and Hall of Science is red, white, and yellow.

Most of the photos have the lamps either in partial view, or cropped out so it is very hard to determine the complete color scheme of those lights. Overhead or under views are the best to figure out the shapes.

A three-quarters view is best to determine the color scheme, for, as best as can be determined, the lights were mirrored on opposite sides.

In regards to size, the smallest 5 cube lamp was 48 inches by 48 inches (4 feet by 4 feet) while the largest 17 cube fixture was 80 inches by 112 inches (6-3/4 feet by 9-1/3 feet)!

I enclose a graphic of my research so far.

NYWFLights.gif

Notice that the cubes surrounding the center post seem to alternate in color. Also if the basic 3 by 3 grid is extended at a corner, that color is extended outward.

I have also found that in most cases if a cube is an extended one (i.e. it is visible on all three sides), then all of its three sides are the same color. Only in a few instances did an extended cube have different colors on it faces, most notably at the NYS Pavilion, which shared red and blue.

In my graphic, the beige color symbolizes the "white" color of the NYWF lights. The cross-hatched patterning indicates cubes not visible from the side, only from above and below.

I have also noted where the particular pattern was found, i.e "Jordan" or "Westinghouse."

Curiously, the light outside of "Minnesota" has a swastika type pattern. Wonder how they got away with that one!

If anyone can help out with better pictures of lamp assemblies, or if you have any documents describing the patterns and scheme, please send them to me at rl@sgi.com .

Thanks,

Randy.

------------------

AMF Monorail Research Project

[This message has been edited by AMFMonorail (edited 08-05-2003).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See Bill Cotters set 60, picture 15, for a picture of your 17-box "Meadow Lake" combination (orange, yellow & white), this time in front of the Mexico Pavilion.

Randy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some odd color combinations in back of the Bell Telephone pavilion.

Directly in back, in looks like two shades of green- dark green & light green, along with white.

And toward the side, there are 9-cubed units, with red, blue and green out on the end cubes, and white on the inside cubes.

Randy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also notice how the two light fixtures in this Africa Pavilion photo are pointed different directions. This seems to rule out any possibility that the oblong configurations 'pointed' anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Randy I can help out with photos. I will call my friend Roberta and we will go on a snap shot trip to Orange County Fair Speedway. They must have 200 lights up there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mary Ellen,

Appreciate the help. If you spot any lights that are not on my list, please do jot down the details. I use a simple quadrille graph paper pad to create the rough drawings then transfer the final version to PowerPoint.

While you are up at the speedway, could you see if they have any fixtures they want to sell or give away?

Or, if they have any of the original flat-panel GE fluorescent lamps please for preservation by a researcher such as myself?

I can send you a better version of the image below in the PowerPoint format if you wish.

Thanks,

Randy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the update, Randy!

Yow... this is a daunting task! Talk about an expert-level jigsaw puzzle. Sort of the DNA of the Fair!

Is the company who made the lights still around?

Incredible start to a horrific uphill trek, Randy. Thank you. It's a very interesting quest.

I also have concern that some of the lights (like I suspect at Canobie Lake Park) have had some Plexi panels changed due to fading and vandalism and therefor cause even more confusion.

it's going to be fascinating to see this unfold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is obviously taking shape here is that Mr. Lambertus' count of twenty-three different configurations quite possibly means that each one represents a letter of the alphabet, less J, Q and Z.

The total number of luminaries throughout the park therefore spells out several full sentences.

This bizarre plan was inspired by the genius of Robert Moses who contracted to have them placed in a specific order to spell the following sentence.

"ROBERT MOSES CREATOR OF THE NEW YORK WORLDS FAIR WILL GO DOWN IN HISTORY AS THE MASTER PLANNER OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. IT IS HIS INSPIRATION THAT BROUGHT TOGETHER FIFTY TWO MILLION DIVERSE HUMANS TO WITNESS THE MOST SPECTACULAR SHOW EVER PRESENTED IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK. HIS LEGACY WILL BE FOREVER FORGED IN THE FOOTPRINTS OF HISTORY BY HIS FORESIGHT TO SEE THAT A GREAT PARK WILL BE GIFTED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY FOR MANY FUTURE GENERATIONS TO ENJOY. SIGNED ROBERT MOSES PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK WORLDS FAIR CORPORATION"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×