Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rose

The price of Gas

Recommended Posts

In 1964 the average price of gas was 30 cents per gallon.

Throughout 1964 gas wars often broke out, lowering further the price of gasoline.

Today I found the lowest price of gas available in my area at the low, low price of $2.03 per gallon. (I know that Randy, Bill and Ray are probably filling their gas tanks at $2.25 or more.)

If a world fair were to occur today: how many parents would avoid visiting the fair, because of high gas prices? How many children (like us) would never get a chance to see the wonder that could mark their lives forever?

If the fair occurred today: my father might not have made the trip.

For road dad's everywhere: keep reaching for the wonder, and try to get by with regular unleaded!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->(I know that Randy, Bill and Ray are probably filling their gas tanks at $2.25 or more.)<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I wish!!!!

Would you believe $2.99 day before yesterday? Of course that's "high test" as they used to call it. At a Mobil station. Arco is usually a few cents cheaper.

Like with the Europeans (who are paying $5.00 plus) it isn't so much differences in cost, it's taxes. European governments do it to actively discourage people from taking their car out of the garage, and instead use public transportation (which is mostly impractical in the U.S. due to differences in topography, distance, and culture).

In California they use gasoline taxes to raise money (so the idiots have even more of our money to burn). It's just another form of income redistribution by the you-know-what party. "If you can afford to have a car you can afford to pay x number of cents on the dollar to pay for programs which benefit those who probably can't afford a car but whose vote counts as much (or more) to get me re-elected".

But doesn't that mean I'll have to pay 80 cents more a gallon than they pay in Georgia, which doesn't even have a single oil refinery?

"Shut up and get out your wallet!"

Let's see, if I stuck enough McDonald's straws together I could have a private pipeline from Rose's backyard and get gas at Michigan prices...

How many vanilla shakes am I gonna have to drink to get that many straws? There's no taxes on shakes, at least for the time being!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While none of us is happy to pay $2. + per gallon for gasoline, we must also realize that the price has been held artificially low for decades. I do not work in the oil industry, hence the name, Plumber, but I have looked at some old receipt and budget books of mine from the 1964/65 period. This may surprise a few of you.

1964 Item 2004 Change?

$2478 loaded Ford Mustang $24,300 = 10x

$14,000 3 bedroom frame ranch house $135,000 = 9x

.69 lb. of butter 2.19 = 3x

.15 Micky D's Cheesburger .99 = 6x

$3.69hr Plumbers wage and benefits $36.75 = 9x

.68 1000cuft Natural gas $7.98 = 11x

$7.00 Doctor office call $120.00 = 17x

.39 Large eggs-dozen .79 = 2x

.59 1/2 gallon milk $1.55 = 3x

Just be glad we have farmers that will still farm for the prices they get!

(Sorry for the jumbled numbers, I'm too lazy to build a spread sheet for this )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in NY State but work in NJ. The gas prices are about 30 cents per gallon lower and in NJ law requires the station employees to pump the gas. I cannot figure it out but - I make a point to fill up in NJ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that, Plumber. I was hoping someone would post the list, that's going around the net, that compares the price of a gallon of gas to the price of a gallon of other liquids.

I.E., gallon gas = $2.00; gallon spring water = $10.00; gallon Chanel #5 = $5000.00, etc.

Two bucks is fine by me, that's 22 miles I don't have to walk!

(Your milage may vary)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think if gas prices were adjusted for inflation we are still paying less than drivers were in at times in the 80s. Not very comforting as I filled up tonight.

For the past few weeks I was able to fill up at a truck stop outside of Ann Arbor for $1.77/gallon but even the truck stop was up to $2.09 last time I looked. In fact every station I passed tonight was $2.09/gallon.

A lot of the increased costs can be traced to consolidation of the oil industry. In the past decade many refineries have been closed to consolidate operations and cut costs. What this has done in the long run is lower production capacity and increase the value of the product.

Most of the production is controlled by a handful of multinationals. By reducing capacity they have eliminated the promised economies of scale.

That's not to say other forces haven't been at work. Both environmental and NIMBY groups keep new refineries from being built (there have been no new refineries built in the US for something like 15 to 20 years). The popularity of SUVs and so on.

Anyway my thoughts for what it's worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several years ago, a German exchange student spent time with my family. He was a student at the high school where I teach. Among the many lessons I learned from him was that we have little to complain about when it comes to the price of gasoline. A comparable amount of gasoline in Germany would cost (at that time) somewhere between five and six dollars. The result is that while he was here, he learned how to drive a standard transmission automobile. It is virtually impossible to purchase an automatic transmission vehicle in Germany simply because they do not get the fuel economy of a standard transmission. Furthermore, a driver's license in Germany can cost about $1,800. And one must be able to handle a standard transmission in order to get that initial license.

This young man was stunned at the size of American vehicles. (Automobiles in Europe are much smaller and far more fuel efficient.) Some he found to be nothing less than funny--pick up trucks (especially the enormous ones) for instance. While he understood some might need them for work related purposes, he noticed that most had empty cargo areas and were driven by people who never used them for utility purposes. He also failed to grasp the concept of an 9,000 pound SUV (with pathetic fuel economy) carrying a 120 pound woman to work. He found my two vehicles to be way out of the norm for a "typical" American. I own what is now a 14 year old Corolla (which gets about 48 mpg) and a Passat (which averages 37 mpg). Both are standard transmission. Gasoline prices are high today. But we have not done much at all to address a problem in the making for decades--and one which will only become more serious in the near future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one seams to want change (in regard to transportation fuel alternatives) badly enough to demand, or purchase hybrid, electric or other alternative fuel vehicles.

At this year's auto show in Detroit several hybrid cars were displayed. All got chuckles from local newscasters. All got the same review by passing viewers. All viewers polled seamed to imply, that they thought it was good to manufacture hybrid cars. All seamed to say they wouldn't have such in their drive way.

There are things we can do to conserve fuel. We can also manufacture alternative forms of fuel. These things are costly, and do not seam to capture the majority of the public's interest.

I visited my sister in Scandinavia a few years ago. (She was doing research for her thesis there.) While visiting her: I got very used to the ample and affordable public transportation available to me there. I often rode a train or bus to various cities, and always enjoyed the experience.

One day a train my sister and I were on was running late. My sister turned to a co worker/researcher that was also on the train. "You'll miss your connecting bus. " She said to him. "Oh no." he added, calmly. "They'll pay for a taxi to where I'm going." I was astounded to learn that the train service was guaranteed to make connections, and if it didn't: alternative, and usually superior, transportation was provided for free. The train workers were also profuse in their apologizes for any inconvenience. In Scandinavia, public transportation is very good, and a great alternative to driving.

Here in the "blue water area" our public buses use natural gas. The buses run efficiently and, I'm told, more cheaply, and with less pollution, than those that use gasoline.

Gas here in the "thumb" was down to $2.09 a gallon this morning. I never thought two dollars a gallon would seam cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has made me think of how some of the great fairs have tried to spotlight mass transportation: Century 21's Monorail in Seattle, the AMF Monorail in NY, the Expo Express and the Minirail in Montreal--to name several. But Americans have not embraced these concepts. Forty years after Century 21, Seattle still has not developed its monorail system. Montreal is something of an exception. The Metro, built for the fair, has expanded and is an absolute joy to use. Stations are linked to the underground city with some of the best stores and shops on the continent. The Metro is expaning again and that is good news. But all of this is a drop in the bucket when one looks at the energy challenges we face. Until we are willing to sacrifice and demand responsible changes from governmental and corporate leaders, we will continue tip toe down the path to energy and economic disaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today's price in Phoenix, AZ is $2.19 per gallon unleaded. Rather than drive, I would love to use my bike more often, but the drivers down here would put me out of commission!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunately, from news reports, they say that Oklahoma is usally among the lowest for a gallon of Gas. So... tonight I paid for the 1st time in my life $2 a gallon! This was for 91 octane. $1.89 for regular.

During the energy crisis in the early 80's, I remember something being said at the U.S. Pavilion (loved that building, so sad it's gone, that is another story in itself) at the 1982 Knoxville World's Fair that gas was projected to be at $8 a gallon by 1990! So, in retrospect, we have done well. Very well.

What kills me, is people only care if they can "afford" it or not, not whether to help conserve at all. I truly get mad at all the HUGE SUVS running around doing nothing more than an avg car can do at half the fuel consumption.

I say bring on the alternatives. The Toyota Prius is looking pretty good to me right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<!--quoteo--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->What kills me, is people only care  if they can "afford" it or not, not whether to help conserve at all. I truly get mad at all the HUGE SUVS running around doing nothing more than an avg car can do at half the fuel consumption.  

I say bring on the alternatives. The Toyota Prius is looking pretty good to me right now.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

What I am is an Escalade Hater

I see no use for an Suv other than to waste

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Between the Fair years, that is after the '64 Fair closed for the season, I drove to Texas. I remember running into a "gas war" in Houston. I bought gas for nine cents a gallon. The place accross the street was charging 8 but the lines were too long.

I went on to Austin where I stayed with a friend of mine who worked at the Fair but lived in Texas. I think he was an "operator" (driver) like me, but I don't believe he came back for the '65 season.

I passed through Austin for the first time since '64 last summer. It was unrecognizable. It's a big city now.

Larry Lief

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I paid $2.11 yesterday. I heard on the news that in Chicagoland, gasoline has hit $4.00 a gallon. I would hate to be trapped in a 10,000 lb SUV getting 3 mpg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the weekend I filled up again, and in just a week's time it dropped 17%- from $2.99 down to $2.49. I think the $2.99 was an outlier price anyway- I'll try to avoid that station in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$2.11 reg. unleaded here. Up from Friday's $2.03.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I honestly cannot figure the gasoline situation. I filled up at $2.11 on one side of the small town where I live but noticed another station had regular at $1.97 today. I was in Syracuse on Saturday and saw gasoline prices ranging from $1.96 to $2.07. I wonder why the price discrepencies especially when the gas stations are so close to each other. And why would Exxon and Mobil stations (across the street from each other) have two different prices considering they are now the same company?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What did happen to the concept of conserving fuel? My students think it is strange when I urge them to turn off lights when not in use or when we discuss the different ways one can conserve gasoline. That idea has almost completely disappeared and we need it now, more than ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×