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Hoodlock

Carnival

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I enjoyed the piece on Carnival and the good Jimmy I.C. Chiang did for both an empty building and for a slumberous Amusement Area (not to mention my love life).

Towards the end of the Fair, I had seen the entire Fair and my interest then was turning towards girls. My friends and I would still go to the pavilions in the mornings; however, the afternoons were spent at Carnival’s Café Au Go Go (where the teenage girls would go to dance).

The DJ’s name at the Au Go Go was Carlos. Our path crossed twice after the Fair ended, once at the Joker’s Wild on the island of Freeport in the Bahamas where he was the DJ (1966), then a year latter at the Electric Circus in New York’s East Village.

I came across this web site on carnival rides; I liked it and thought PTU members might too.

<a href="http://www.flatrides.com/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.flatrides.com/index.html</a>

Pop quiz;

Can anyone tell me the name of the Sea Aquarium at Carnival, or its top attractions?

Who can name any of the seven rides for small children that were inside of the building at Carnival?

Here is one for Mitch, how many people did the Certificate of Occupancy allow on the Carousel at Carousel Park?

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As always I do look at your fabulous photos Mike, however the information I gleamed was from the secret source.

I just checked-out you web site and could not find anything showing the S.S. Spellbound.

I did see more photos regarding Florida’s exhibit. Did I ever tell you the story concerning the Flamingos?

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You got me on that one Bruce, I haven't come across that number. The carousel sat about 80 people and there must have been consideration for standers. I would guess the number to be maybe 120 maximum.

How'd I do? Please tell...

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Just kiddin'. It's a yet unscanned photo.

But there is a carnival-esque sign out front with that title. Thought it might have been the aquarium. Says something about live piranha....there's one for the kiddies! Wonder who they threw in?

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The Sea Aquarium was called the SS Spellbound and featured Piranha and a 750-pound man-eating clam (I am not sure if that was a large clam or a large man eating a clam).

The seven rides for small children were:

Boat ride

Fire engine ride

Swing ride

Automobile ride

Tank ride

Roadway ride

Helicopter ride

They were installed on March 5, 1965 inside the main building, formally the theater that held “To Broadway with Love”.

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Thank you for the link in the original post. The photographs of the Parachute Jump are among the best I have seen. Furthermore, the scenes of the Jump in various stages of restoration are most interesting. It will probably never be operational again, but that is not the point. It is being lovingly restored and will endure as a part of NY heritage. That is a most happy ending for this long neglected legacy. It is interesting, however, that it is seen as more a part of the heritage of Brooklyn and Coney Island than a legacy of the 1939-40 NYWF. That is OK, of course, as long as it is saved. I wonder how many people look at it and realize its first gig was at The Big Fair in Queens.

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