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Some interesting information on irradiated dimes… <a href="http://www.coin-newbies.com/articles/irradiated.html" target="_blank">http://www.coin-newbies.com/articles/irradiated.html</a>

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Where would you find The Church of the New Jerusalem, Swedenborgian Exhibit?

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The Swedenborgian Exhibit was located in the Protestant and Orthodox Center.

The unique Swedenborgian convert, John Chapman, is better known in American folklore as Johnny Appleseed. In addition to his legendary sowing of seeds in the Midwestern wilderness, Johnny Appleseed carried with him all of the Swedenborgian publications he could procure and distributed them wherever the opportunity was presented.

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I'm a member of the Swedenborgian denomination (no, it's not from Sweden and we aren't a wierd Swedish cult!).Last May, after Hoodlock gave me a tour of FMCP, I discovered that a fellow member of the national committee I'm on (a retired minister), had spent several days manning the Swedenborgian exhibit in 1964. He couldn't remember many details, like where the exhibit was located, but he did enjoy the experience.

Swedenborg is the name of the man who's writings about spirituality are the basis for the Swedenborgian church. It's named after him, but he didn't start it. A hint on pronounciation -the word "Swedenborgian" is pronounced with a soft "g". If you use the hard "g" we know you aren't one of us! . However, at times we do get a kick out of saying "We are the Borg, resistance is futile, you will be assimilated!".

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So, Bench you can't let a guy have any fun…

Can you or anyone else tell me where you could find eight white Alfa Romeo cars at the 1964 World's Fair?

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I learned about the eight white Alfa Romeos after reading an account of a visit to the Fair a day before it opened. The cars were a part of Wonder World's Air and Water Show held at the Amphitheater. The story was published in the New Yorker magazine on May 2, 1964.

In this story, a hapless group of reporters went sloshing through the fair on April 21, 1964 for a preview. Their first stop was the Hall of Magic, to see the The Smoke Ring. The manager of the pavilion told the reporters that a worker connected the wiring incorrectly and although the smoke rings weren't working, he assured that it would be fixed in a few hours. To ease their wait he opened a bottle of champagne.

The group then went over to see Lincoln, he too was not yet ready. Pavilion after pavilion the group witnesses the same scenario, workers feverishly working while promising completion by tomorrow.

The group went to the most unlikely exhibits, the Pavilion, the Santa Maria, and Wonder World. The group went to and was disappointed in the Federal Pavilion, however they didn't view the ride up stairs. Upon leaving, they saw a smoke ring rise above the fair. they ran over to greet the workers at General Cigar, this marking the highlight of their visit.

The article was drawn out with little facts, still it was interesting. Seek out a copy and read it for yourself.

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Not even close.

Look at the angle on the NYS and Unisphere® in both photos

Nice clear shot, though!

[This message has been edited by DougSeed (edited 09-19-2002).]

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The photographs were taken moments from each other. Look at the two buses by the Rocket Thrower. There are other buses too if you look for them, same camera, same day.

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Looks like late morning in these pictures. Also they are probably shot from to high an altitude to see individual people so it would look deserted even if it were not.

Lines of people might be visible and I don't see any.

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I have combined the pictures below and it forms a hyperstereo image. These were taken moments apart as Hood has suggested. This is a widely used technique to get 3D images from great distances. This one is not perfect but it does show some depth.

I'll try to make an anaglyph version and post it later (red/blue glasses to view).

Hyper%20worldfair.JPG

For the anaglyph version biggrin.gifownload www.64nywf65.20m.com/HyperWFAnaglyph.bmp

[This message has been edited by MitchS (edited 09-20-2002).]

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Here's one source that you can get a single pair, some places have a minimum order:

<a href="http://www.rainbowsymphony.com/freestuff.html" target="_blank">http://www.rainbowsymphony.com/freestuff.html</a>

[This message has been edited by MitchS (edited 09-21-2002).]

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PRODUCER MICHAEL TODD JR.

By DENNIS MCLELLAN, Los Angeles Times

Michael Todd Jr., son of the legendary producer of "Around the World in 80 Days," who worked on the first Cinerama movie and later produced the only feature film ever shot in Smell-o-Vision, has died. He was 72.

Todd died of lung cancer Sunday at his home in County Carlow, Ireland.

After his flamboyant father died in a plane crash in 1958, the soft-spoken Todd took over the reins of his motion picture production company. The 28-year-old Todd inherited half of his father's multimillion-dollar estate, which he shared with his 26-year-old stepmother, Elizabeth Taylor, who had married Michael Todd Sr. only 13 months before his death.

Although Todd never rivaled his father's success as a producer, he made history with "Scent of Mystery," a 1960 film about a vacationing Englishman who discovers a plot to kill a young American tourist in Spain.

The movie, which starred Denholm Elliott and Peter Lorre, tapped an invention created by a Swiss professor who discovered how to reproduce odors in movie theaters. The process consisted of tiny plastic tubes hidden under the theater seats, through which could be pumped garlic, pipe smoke and other scents from a centralized "smell brain."

Newspaper advertisements for "Scent of Mystery" played up the revolutionary process's place in film history, proclaiming, "First They Moved (1895)! Then They Talked (1927)! Now They Smell!"

Unfortunately, most critics turned their noses up at the process.

After graduating from Amherst College, where he majored in philosophy, Todd went to work with his father, who was a producer on "This Is Cinerama," a travelogue that demonstrated the unique process's 3-D effect.

It was the younger Todd's suggestion to include what became the film's most famous sequence: a stomach-churning roller-coaster ride from the vantage point of the coaster's front car.

After working on "This is Cinerama," Todd joined the Navy. After his discharge in 1957, he joined his father's film company as vice president.

Following the lead of his father, who had produced attractions for the 1939 New York World's Fair, Todd produced a racially integrated minstrel show for the 1964 New York World's Fair. But whereas his father became one of the earlier exposition's top impresarios, Todd did not. His "America, Be Seated!" closed after two performances.

With his first wife, Sarah, whom he married in 1953, Todd had six children -- Cyrus, Susan, Sarah, Eliza Haselton, Daniel and Oliver.

In 1972, after his first wife's death, Todd married Susan McCarthy, with whom he had two sons, Del and James. The family moved to Ireland in 1973.

Todd and his wife co-wrote "A Valuable Property: The Life Story of Michael Todd," published by Arbor House in 1983.

In addition to his wife and children, he is survived by a half-sister, Liza.

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I watched an excerpt of "America, Be Seated" from the Ed Sullivan Show from 1964 at the Museum of Television and Radio in New York. From what I saw it looked like a stirring, energetic show. Lou Gosset and, I believe, Lola Falana were among the performers. That excerpt, anyway, did not have the demeaning characters of a traditional minstrel show, but the show became a lightning rod for racial protestors. A major reason as to its rapid closing.

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Someone months ago posted that actor Morgan Freeman performed at the 64 witha large "minstrel show". Noone could pinpoint which production in which pavilion that would be. There was a minstrel-like number in "To Broadway With Love" with a large cast of black men. Maybe Mr. Freeman appeared in "America, Be Seated"? Where was it on the Fair map?

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Bench it was me who told of Morgan Freeman dancing at the Fair. Mike Todd's show was opened at Bourbon Street. Todd would have done better at the Fair if he showed his Smell-O-Vision movie, which was also shot in TODD-AO. I recall my cousin Mike telling me of his experience in viewing Scent of Mystery; he said it made him sick. A deodorized version of Scent of Mystery was released under the title Holiday in Spain.

Can someone tell me the difference between the TODD-AO and Cinerama? Cinerama?

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Sure, be glad to! biggrin.gif

The original Cinerama used a camera assembly consisting of 3 35mm cameras, each pointing approximately 50 degrees apart, for a horizontal coverage of 146 degrees, and a vertical coverage of 55 degrees. The cameras ran at 26 frames per second (a normal camera runs at 24). So each shot would produce 3 strips of film. Overall aspect ratio was 2.65:1 .

Projection was the reverse of shooting, each of the 3 projectors spaced ~50 degrees apart, projecting onto a deeply curved screen of 146 degrees, in theaters specially and expensively designed for the process exclusively. The screen consists of thousands of overlapping strips, to eliminate cross reflection.

The 7 channel stereo sound system was astonishing for the day, and was a key aspect of the production. With very few exceptions, all film sound was mono at this time (1952).

Three-panel Cinerama reigned from 1952's "This Is Cinerama" to 1963's "How The West Was Won". Five "travelogues" and 2 features, all doing BIG box-office.

Mike Todd's Todd-AO was the process that "overtook" Cinerama. "Cinerama out of one hole" was how Todd described the system he wanted.

Todd-AO (AO = American Optical Co.) was one 65mm camera, running at 30 frames per second (originally).

Projection prints were 70mm, the extra width provided for 6 tracks of magnetic stereo sound applied to the print. (Cinerama ran an interlocked magnetic sound reproducer.) Todd-AO was also projected onto a curved screen, a more conventional and less drastically curved one-piece screen.

Todd-AO morphed into 70mm Super Panavision eventually, and Todd-AO and SP70 films were presented in Cinerama theaters in the late 60's. (2001, Grand Prix, etc.)

Todd-AO still exists today, as a film sound company. Cinerama also exists, as a corpse, at Pacific Theaters in Los Angeles.

Both systems were, and still are IMO, the epitomy of motion picture presentation. I've never seen anything come close, not IMAX or digital or .....

Anyone interested in this stuff--it's a very 50's & 60's thing--should check out Marty Hart's "Wide Screen Museum" website. It's fantastic, and is to film technology what nywf64.com is to our Fair. http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/

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