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xl5er

Futurama 64/65 Inspired?

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Laser model still in prototype. There might be a road builder just off camera to the right. 

 

 

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It took me a minute, but I finally got the connection.

 

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They never mentioned the road-kill commissary.  :o

  • Haha 1

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Wayne, there’s a recipe book for cooking road kill in your engine compartment called Manifold Destiny. 

Kind of ironic that all the enviro-hand-wringing generated by the ecological damage of the Jungle Clearer led to the idea of, among other things, wind turbines. That’s... avian cuisinarts by any other name. Seriously, there’s a lot of data about their impact on birds. Literally. 

Mass solar mirror arrays in the desert have more of a searing effect on flying wildlife and shading effect on plants and ground dwelling animals. 

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The Audubon society is pretty insistent on siting turbines far offshore, out of migratory paths for that very reason.  There are other designs that are less harmful to birds, but not as efficient or economical in many locations.

I'd been looking for that Manifold Destiny cookbook for a while.  I didn't realize it was roadkill based.  My parents had the earlier Volkswagen cookbook, that told you how to cook food wrapped in foil by placing it in specific spots in the engine compartment of a Beetle.  Cooking times were listed in miles.

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If I correctly recall, Lowell on the tv sitcom. Wings, once sold a device called the Car-B-Cue.  The company slogan was something to the effect:  “Remember when hitting a possum was sad?  Well, now it’s a party!”  And Roy Biggins who ran Aeromass Airlines purchased one because he was driving to Virginia that weekend and had always wanted to try Peking Duck.

Funny enough but there is no question that very few people in 1965 understood the incredible tragedy of destroying habitats and forests in the name of mechanized progress.  The stunning loss of Amazon rainforest this year, alone, is evidence that we now know much better what is good for our collective futures.  The problem is we’re still not ready to do what is fully necessary to save our fragile planet.

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