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R390A

Undeveloped film from 1964

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Found an interesting YouTube video about a roll of undeveloped film. Its sad to think about today's storage methods.  Your grandchildren would find a broken phone in the attic with no way of reading the memory or your video's would be lost in the forgotten cloud. 

 

 

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I'm torn on my digital preservation efforts.  I feel like I should be curating my collections more since giant piles of pictures will be too much trouble for someone else to sort through and wind up ignored, but on the other hand, the random unimportant images are often the ones here that are most valuable for filling in an undocumented corner of the fair.

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Every time I go to the Fairfax Flea Market here in Los Angeles, there is a vendor who only sells people's old photographs and slides by the thousands. I always enjoy going through the large collection of plastic bins filled with strangers snapshots. But when I leave, I also feel a bit melancholy-- like, what happened to all of these people-- and why didn't their loved ones want to keep any of their photos?

Nothing lasts forever, I guess.

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I agree.  I often wonder what became of the families, friends and loved ones and why did nobody want those photos. 

Two thoughts:  When the last of my mother's closest friends died about ten years ago, the deceased woman's family sorted through dozens of photograph albums and took snapshots that meant the most to each.  All the rest they shared with the families of their mother's friends and allowed us to take any photos that had special memories for us.  It was liked discovering a treasure chest of memories.  

Secondly, when my sister turned 60, I put all of our 1965 NYWF slides onto a dvd and I enlarged two photos which captured my sister and our father together.  We lost him just two months after our Fair trip and that loss hurt her very much so those two beautiful snapshots, captured their deep affection half a century later.  My sister had not seen those slides in fifty years and she loved discovering them and seeing us with our long departed parents.  This may be the best gift I have ever given.

The best way to preserve so many photographic memories may just be the good old fashion photograph album.  Such albums capture the past even better than a time capsule.

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It's funny how momentos are only really wanted by immediate family (and maybe family tree researchers).

Mostly wanted by the next Gen only, two Gen down, doesn't seem to matter much.

And even then, it's select. 

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9 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

Having bought many photos no longer wanted by families it's very sad indeed.

 

Thankfully, groups like us, look for contextually based photos to preserve the history of events.  Relationships come as distant second in these shots.

Still, this is a win. 

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I have slides from the fair taken by my brother who passed away last month. It is great to see him as a happy 13 year old enjoying the fair. When I`m gone I doubt that my own kids and grandkids will want to keep these pictures of us at the fair. Sad indeed.

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My dad recently passed, and my siblings and I have been scanning and sharing pictures of him, so there's a chance your kids will want them.

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23 hours ago, speedwell said:

My dad recently passed, and my siblings and I have been scanning and sharing pictures of him, so there's a chance your kids will want them.

One hopes...

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A couple things I noticed in the BuzzFeed video.  The test film he used to experiment with developing was Tri-X, a high speed black and white film stock.  It appears the film from the Fair was also black and white.  I can remember trying to buy black and white 8mm film in the mid-60s and it was very difficult to find.  It seems odd that Kodak would have provided black and white film with the camera that was won as a prize.

 

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at 06:28
"Due to the age of the film and the chemicals he was using, he was only able to develop a black and white image." [emphasis added]

I take that to mean it was color film.

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3 hours ago, waynebretl said:

at 06:28
"Due to the age of the film and the chemicals he was using, he was only able to develop a black and white image." [emphasis added]

I take that to mean it was color film.

I think most 8mm film then was color as it was generally intended for home use. I don't think any of our films are in B&W.

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I can understand the dilemma, as I recently inherited the family photos, two giant boxes of them. I plan on sending them off to be digitized and put on CDs, but still need to pick through them to decide which ones.  Family ones, yes, but what about the ones of people that I don't have any idea who they are?   And then what?  Keep the photos and negatives or trash them?  The next generation has shown no interest in them.  Being the family archivist is an awesome responsibility.  

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