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Bill Cotter

Playing a merry tune

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Playing the carillon at Coca-Cola, May 1964. Newly restored 35mm slide.

coca-cola-carillon.jpg

I wonder where one practices for this sort of instrument? Not like there are many home versions! And, in case you were wondering, the sheet music is labeled "Piano Music for Leisure Hour". You wouldn't want to be play "Piano Music for Work Hour" by mistake!

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Really arranged so an organist can play it - even has expression pedals. 

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I would think the response time - and note length - of a bell would be somewhat different than a piano or an organ - but what do I know?

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Don't know if this look inside the works has been posted here before:

http://www.grantbob.com/2007/05/inside-carillon.html

 

I looked up the Grommes-Precision amplifiers shown in the grantbob.com photos and see that they specialize in public address amplifiers and also in lightning protection for PA systems. Of course! Never thought about that aspect before.

https://www.grommesprecision.com/index.html

 

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I actually heard a concert given by this instrument.  But it wasn't at the Fair.

It was years later when I was a freshman at Georgia Tech.  I took a weekend trip to Stone Mountain.

The music was quite impressive, and at the time I never made the connection that this instrument was at the Fair.

 

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8 hours ago, sunguar said:

I actually heard a concert given by this instrument.  But it wasn't at the Fair.

It was years later when I was a freshman at Georgia Tech.  I took a weekend trip to Stone Mountain.

The music was quite impressive, and at the time I never made the connection that this instrument was at the Fair.

 

I'd like to get there someday.

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8 hours ago, sunguar said:

I actually heard a concert given by this instrument.  But it wasn't at the Fair.

It was years later when I was a freshman at Georgia Tech.  I took a weekend trip to Stone Mountain.

The music was quite impressive, and at the time I never made the connection that this instrument was at the Fair.

 

There's a Georgia Tech connection to the existing speaker tower too as it was designed by Ed Moulthrop who taught at Georgia Tech. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moulthrop_family Ed was a super nice guy that I had the pleasure of meeting several times but by that time he was well into his woodturning career and I didn't even know about the carillon yet.

(Not related to the carillon's life at the fair but still a nice factoid) 

 

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19 hours ago, Bill Cotter said:

I would think the response time - and note length - of a bell would be somewhat different than a piano or an organ - but what do I know?

Yes you hit the nail on the head here. I asked Mabel Sharp (the current carillonneur) about this once and even though the console is basically an organ console, attempting to play it as such would result in a harmonic disaster. The tones of each bell can still affect the others in the rack. You've got to learn what you can play together, what to leave out and how to break things up. Evidently Mabel played the harp before learning the carillon and it has similar issues. There is also quite a noticeable delay between when you strike a key and when you hear the sound from the speaker tower. Even when you use the local monitor in the room with the console there's more delay than I expected.

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Grant, thanks for joining and bringing all the info.  

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On 9/2/2019 at 10:13 PM, Grant said:

There's a Georgia Tech connection to the existing speaker tower too as it was designed by Ed Moulthrop who taught at Georgia Tech. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moulthrop_family Ed was a super nice guy that I had the pleasure of meeting several times but by that time he was well into his woodturning career and I didn't even know about the carillon yet.

(Not related to the carillon's life at the fair but still a nice factoid) 

 

Thanks for that info, Grant.

I'll have to research if I had Ed as a teacher (architecture).  In fact, he may have been the one to steer us to the carillon at Stone Mountain.

 

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