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Bill Cotter

For fans of aerial views, here's one dated June 1964.

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Maybe it's a function of age, but I've increasingly noticed how dramatically different the 1939 and 1964 Fair layout truly were.  What I mean is that one of the accolades given to the 1939 NYWF was the remarkable attention given to the overall theme as pavilion architecture radiated on avenues extending from the theme center.  That attention to theme was even captured in the subtle rainbow color pattern permitted exhibitors as one walked from the pure white Trylon and Perisphere to the farthest extremities of the Fair's avenues.

This didn't happen in 1964.  It was something of an architectural free-for-all and the Fair planners (or lack thereof) were widely criticized for that lack of architectural unity at the time.  This photo captures that lack of thematic cohesion.  This is not to say the Fair lacked creativity.  It was a colorful collection of unique styles but it was basically  a "to each his own" attitude that gave us what we see in this photograph.  

Therein lies a major difference between the two Flushing Meadow fairs.

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Personally, I'm glad they went the "free-for-all" approach, or we would like have never seen structures like the Bell System, IBM, etc.

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You may be correct, Bill, but considering the 1939 Board for Design, there were some remarkably artful and creative pavilions.  Con Edison, NCR, GM, Heinz (which initially wanted a pickle shaped building), Italy, USSR, Poland, GE and the list goes on.  

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I agree with Bill. The 1964 fair was a treasure trove of interesting views for the serious photographer. Afraid I would have lost interest in recording a more planned, thematic affair. Got enough of that touring scores of cathedrals in Europe, which got less and less inspiring as the tally increased.

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12 hours ago, Jim said:

You may be correct, Bill, but considering the 1939 Board for Design, there were some remarkably artful and creative pavilions.  Con Edison, NCR, GM, Heinz (which initially wanted a pickle shaped building), Italy, USSR, Poland, GE and the list goes on.  

I believe many of those came about because the Board quit in protest over the reaction to their plans.

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Surprising that Denmark was one of the few to put advertising (for the airlines) on its roof.  (Well, except for the Orange Julius fiasco)

Bill, any chance you can send me a high res file of this scan?  Thanks.

 

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