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waynebretl

Chrysler star salesmen trip/tour documents

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Here's documentation for a special World's Fair and New York City tour given by Chrysler to several hundred salesmen from across the country (and their wives) who were in the "Allstar Medallion Salesman's Club." 

The trip was awarded to several hundred, all visiting on the same first weekend after opening. The custom "Trip Reminder" booklet lists the time and place of arranged activities along with the names of all attendees. 

There is also a custom-overprinted Hammond map with locations of Fair site and Manhattan locations of the hotel and arranged activities circled, and suggested tour routes through the Fair. (Hammond created many custom versions of this map for various companies.)

Finally, I have included a scan of two tickets for off-site activities (that obviously were not used, or they would have been taken by one of the providers).

Star Salesmen Trip Reminder.pdf

Star Salesmen Hammond map.pdf

Star Salesmen activity tickets.pdf

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Some observations:

1) It must have cost Chrysler a lot (even in 1964 dollars) to send over 375 people to New York and to the Fair at once (plus hotel, meals, transportation)

2) Interestingly only the single people on the trip were women (sign of the times?).

3) I wonder if they had a "staff" photographer for some or all the trip (especially for Chrysler-Plymouth events).

4) I kind of expected the "official" trip route would bypass Ford and GM (but I wonder how many snuck away to see them)

5) Except for an initial stop for the "Water Wonderland Show" at the Amphitheater, the red-headed stepchild of the Fair (Lake Amusement Area) gets ignored again. It's a shame they didn't even get to see the "American Indian Pavilion".

 

Thanks for posting this.

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Typical, I think for big sales organizations - both recognizing the real importance of the sales department and flattering the salesmen's egos. Listing everyone's name was entirely unnecessary to the logistics of the tour, but it was reinforcement of a perception of high status. 

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2 hours ago, sunguar said:

Some observations:

1) It must have cost Chrysler a lot (even in 1964 dollars) to send over 375 people to New York and to the Fair at once (plus hotel, meals, transportation)

2) Interestingly only the single people on the trip were women (sign of the times?).

3) I wonder if they had a "staff" photographer for some or all the trip (especially for Chrysler-Plymouth events).

4) I kind of expected the "official" trip route would bypass Ford and GM (but I wonder how many snuck away to see them)

5) Except for an initial stop for the "Water Wonderland Show" at the Amphitheater, the red-headed stepchild of the Fair (Lake Amusement Area) gets ignored again. It's a shame they didn't even get to see the "American Indian Pavilion".

 

Thanks for posting this.

I thought the same thing about the only single people being women.  Actually, I found a couple single men on the list.

 

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The smaller tidbits are the notes taken.

1. The handwriting style, I see it in my parents generation but no where else now., especially with my generation.

2. The bus notes and which show they were considering.

==============

I dunno, you should always see what your competition is doing, it's the same field and it allows you to share and network with each other.  So wouldn't be shocked to see Chrysler encourage going to those exhibits.

The freedom the guests had was amazing.  

I keep thinking of Barney Miller's intro when I read about the cruise around Manhattan.

Any idea who's packet this was?

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The seller is in Springtown, Texas, but sells a variety of antiques/memorabilia from a variety of places and times. No indication of who the original owners might have been. 

 

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